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    For Immiediate Release
    July 27, 2011

    Contact: 
    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    Poll conducted at NCLR Annual Conference held in Washington, D.C. 

    Washington, D.C.—Immigration overwhelmingly trumps both the economy and education as the most important issue for Latinos, according to a recent poll of 547 supporters and attendees at the 2011 NCLR Annual Conference. Almost half (45 percent) of all respondents chose immigration as the top issue, as opposed to jobs and the economy (25 percent), education (21 percent), and health care (6 percent).

    “Since the enactment of SB 1070 and other Arizona-style anti-Latino legislation, immigration has vaulted to the top of the Latino community’s key concerns for the first time in polling history,” said Janet Murguía, NCLR President and CEO. “This should serve as a wake-up call to politicians on both sides of the aisle that inaction on this issue will be a huge factor in the upcoming elections.”

    The straw poll, conducted in partnership with Lake Research Partners and Revolution Messaging via text message, also revealed attendees’ attitudes about President Barack Obama and provided insight into the 2012 elections. While nearly 80 percent of respondents said that they plan on voting for Obama in the upcoming election, only 29 percent “strongly approved” of the president’s job performance, whereas 44 percent “somewhat approved” and 27 percent “disapproved.”

    “With the election just a little more than a year away, Conference participants are looking first and foremost to support and represent the Latino community,” added Celinda Lake of Lake Research Partners.

    Survey respondents indicated that they are more likely to vote in 2012 to support and represent Latinos (63 percent), rather than in support of either the Democratic (34 percent) or Republican party (3 percent). This should come as no surprise given the bipartisan lack of action on issues of importance to the Hispanic community.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Latinos. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org, or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

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    This post first appeared on New Latina on Sunday, July 24.

    By Angélica Pérez-Litwin, PhD


    Arianna Huffington and Angelica Perez-Litwin at the NCLR Conference

    Today, Arianna Huffington, the president and editor-in-chief of the AOL Huffington Post Media Group, delivered the keynote address at the Latinas Brunch of the 2011 NCLR (National Council of La Raza) Conference. Amidst a room filled with over 1,800 Latinos of all ages, nationalities and professional background, this influential social icon stood in front of us and immediately felt like one of us.

    No, Arianna Huffington is not Latina (she’s Greek American), but she shares with us a common denominator—personal life stories marked by perseverance, strength and sacrifice—the immigrant experience. She’s undeniably a connoisseur of the American dream, a triumphant woman that encapsulates and symbolizes the immigrant spirit.
    She spoke about her mother, who sold her last pair of earrings to pay for her school. Who doesn’t have a Latina mother who hasn’t sacrificed herself to bestow her children with opportunities she did not have? And then there is the accent. Her opening remark during the keynote speech produced a collective laughter when she joked about how wonderful it was to be surrounded by other people with accents.

    Arianna spoke candidly about failures, rejections and hurdles, but with one very clear message: don’t give up on yourself.

    As I listened to this very familiar voice, it became clear to me that, as we move forward as a Latino force in this country, we ought to share and give voice to our personal stories — that perhaps ethnic/racial/political/social labels matter less than the common threads between our collective personal narratives. And it made me wonder: Could this simple act of sharing serve as the fertile grounds for creating compassionate diversity in this country? Perhaps.

    Half-way through her speech, Arianna shared a mother-daughter moment in her life—one that resonated deeply with me. She told us about the day, as a young teen, when she came to her mother and announced that she wanted to go to college in Cambridge. Her mother’s answer: “Why not?,” and with her mother’s enthusiastic blessings, Arianna went on to pursue her studies in London.

    About 2 years ago, my now 17-year teen daughter came to me and excitedly told me that she wanted to study abroad, in London. My answer to her was: “Why?,” with undeniable confusion and anxiety. My over-protective maternal instincts managed to muffle my usual unconditional support for her personal growth. Since then, those conversations have always been uncomfortable, especially as her college application days get closer.

    But Arianna’s story sparked an immediate reaction in me. At 11:43AM this morning, I sent my daughter the following text message:

    “I totally want you to apply to Cambridge. Let’s talk!”
    My daughter’s immediate text reply: “WOOOOH!”

    And that’s the infectious empowerment of story telling.


    Angélica Pérez-Litwin, PhD is the Publisher & CEO of New Latina. You can read her full bio here


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 
    July 27, 2011 
     

    Contact:
    Julian Teixeira
    (202) 776-1812
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    NCLR Awards recognize excellence in communications, sports, and service

    Washington, D.C.—NCLR (National Council of La Raza) presented six awards yesterday to honor individuals and organizations that have demonstrated exemplary accomplishments, both in their fields and in service to the Hispanic community and the United States. NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía congratulated the winners at the organization’s Awards Gala which was the closing event of the 2011 NCLR Annual Conference held July 23–26 in the District of Columbia.

    The award winners are Mary’s Center, a nonprofit community organization in the District of Columbia; Maria Otero, Under Secretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs; Jorge Muñoz, founder of the nonprofit organization An Angel in Queens; Ignacio E. Lozano, Jr., former publisher of La Opinión; former NFL player and coach Thomas R. “Tom” Flores; and former chair of the NCLR Board of Directors José H. Villarreal.

    “NCLR is thrilled to recognize individuals who have made outstanding contributions to the Hispanic community and to our great nation. They have shown that there are no limits to what can be achieved through hard work, vision and perseverance,” Murguía said. “We congratulate Mary’s Center, Maria Otero, Jorge Muñoz, Ignacio Lozano, Jr., Tom Flores, and José Villarreal and thank them for being an inspiration to us all.”

    Mary’s Center, the recipient of NCLR’s Affiliate of the Year Award, is a federally qualified health center in the District of Columbia that served more than 18,000 clients from over 40 countries in 2010. Mary’s Center provides immigrants with services such as prenatal care, home visits, family planning, and primary care for children and adolescents, as well as help with school and job placement. This award is the most visible recognition that NCLR bestows annually to showcase the achievements and impact of an outstanding Affiliate and to recognize the Affiliate’s active engagement in critical NCLR policy and programmatic initiatives.

    Maria Otero, Under Secretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs, was honored with the Graciela Olivarez La Raza Award. She is the highest-ranking Hispanic official at the State Department, and the first Latina Under Secretary in its history. She oversees and coordinates U.S. foreign relations on a variety of global issues, including democracy, human rights, and labor; environment, oceans, health, and science; population, refugees, and migration; and monitoring and combating trafficking in persons. NCLR annually presents this award to an individual or organization that has made significant contributions to promoting the interests of Hispanic Americans.

    Jorge Muñoz received the Maclovio Barraza Award for Leadership. He has fed up to 140 day laborers in his Queens neighborhood seven days per week for the past seven years. His nonprofit, An Angel in Queens, operates on little more than what he can spare from his weekly paycheck as a school bus driver, a few donations from local restaurants, and the help of his family. Muñoz served an estimated of 180,000 free meals in the first five years alone. This award recognizes those who have worked for the betterment of the Hispanic community at the grassroots level and whose leadership has served as a source of strength and support to the Hispanic community.

    Ignacio E. Lozano, Jr. was presented with the Ruben Salazar Award for Communications. As the former publisher of La Opinión, he is a highly respected leader within the media community for his commitment to quality journalism. His groundbreaking work made Spanish-language journalism an integral part of the national media landscape in the United States. This award is given to an individual who has dedicated his or her professional life to portraying issues, concerns, and/or news relevant to contemporary Hispanic America and promoting the positive contributions that Latinos have made to U.S. society.

    The Roberto Clemente Award for Sports Excellence went to Thomas R. “Tom” Flores, the first Hispanic starting quarterback in NFL history and one of only three athletes to win the Super Bowl as both a player and a coach. He is counted among a select few athletes with four Super Bowl rings to his name. His contributions to professional football are impressive, and his contributions to the children of his native California through the Tom Flores Youth Foundation and other charitable work are equally inspiring. This award is presented to an individual renowned in the world of sports and committed to the advancement of Hispanic Americans.

    The Raul Yzaguirre President’s Award was given to José H. Villarreal, chair of the NCLR Board of Directors from 2001 to 2004. This award is presented each year to an individual or organization that has shown outstanding support for NCLR’s mission, goals, and philosophy. Villarreal has dedicated his time, energy, and considerable talent to NCLR’s mission within and outside of the organization. He has personally contributed to the organization’s success by donating hundreds of hours of his time to NCLR and serving as an advisor and mentor to Murguía and an entire generation of emerging Latino leaders. Villarreal was a key player in securing the NCLR headquarters building just four blocks from the White House and establishing an endowment that provides income for NCLR in perpetuity.

    The NCLR Awards Gala, which was co-sponsored by Amtrak, Eli Lilly and Company, Ford Motor Company, and UPS, was held at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Latinos. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org, or follow us on Facebook and Twitter

    ###

     


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    This post first appeared on New Latina on Sunday, July 24.

    By Angélica Pérez-Litwin, PhD


    Arianna Huffington and Angelica Perez-Litwin at the NCLR Conference

    Today, Arianna Huffington, the president and editor-in-chief of the AOL Huffington Post Media Group, delivered the keynote address at the Latinas Brunch of the 2011 NCLR (National Council of La Raza) Conference. Amidst a room filled with over 1,800 Latinos of all ages, nationalities and professional background, this influential social icon stood in front of us and immediately felt like one of us.

    No, Arianna Huffington is not Latina (she’s Greek American), but she shares with us a common denominator—personal life stories marked by perseverance, strength and sacrifice—the immigrant experience. She’s undeniably a connoisseur of the American dream, a triumphant woman that encapsulates and symbolizes the immigrant spirit.

    She spoke about her mother, who sold her last pair of earrings to pay for her school. Who doesn’t have a Latina mother who hasn’t sacrificed herself to bestow her children with opportunities she did not have? And then there is the accent. Her opening remark during the keynote speech produced a collective laughter when she joked about how wonderful it was to be surrounded by other people with accents.

    Arianna spoke candidly about failures, rejections and hurdles, but with one very clear message: don’t give up on yourself.

    As I listened to this very familiar voice, it became clear to me that, as we move forward as a Latino force in this country, we ought to share and give voice to our personal stories — that perhaps ethnic/racial/political/social labels matter less than the common threads between our collective personal narratives. And it made me wonder: Could this simple act of sharing serve as the fertile grounds for creating compassionate diversity in this country? Perhaps.

    Half-way through her speech, Arianna shared a mother-daughter moment in her life—one that resonated deeply with me. She told us about the day, as a young teen, when she came to her mother and announced that she wanted to go to college in Cambridge. Her mother’s answer: “Why not?,” and with her mother’s enthusiastic blessings, Arianna went on to pursue her studies in London.

    About 2 years ago, my now 17-year teen daughter came to me and excitedly told me that she wanted to study abroad, in London. My answer to her was: “Why?,” with undeniable confusion and anxiety. My over-protective maternal instincts managed to muffle my usual unconditional support for her personal growth. Since then, those conversations have always been uncomfortable, especially as her college application days get closer.

    But Arianna’s story sparked an immediate reaction in me. At 11:43AM this morning, I sent my daughter the following text message:

    “I totally want you to apply to Cambridge. Let’s talk!”
    My daughter’s immediate text reply: “WOOOOH!”

    And that’s the infectious empowerment of story telling.


    Angélica Pérez-Litwin, PhD is the Publisher & CEO of New Latina. You can read her full bio here


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    This post first appeared on The Wise Latina Club as part of their “Anatomy of an Immigration Debate” series. 

    By Viviana Hurtado

    Latinos are often described as a “friendly” audience for Democrats and Barack Obama. Therefore it was surprising when the President threw out some “red meat” to rev up the simpaticos at the annual convention of the National Council of La Raza in Washington, DC.

    Instead: Sizzle! It, and he, got a little scorched, in effect turning some of that red meat into carne asada.

    Photo courtesy of @marisabel81
    President Obama addressed several issues at the NCLR Annual Conference, including the economy, education and immigration.


    The President did not get to immigration–the issue most identified with Latinos–until about 15 minutes into his speech. His protests that he can’t change the laws or that he needs Congressional leadership (he does) were met with revolt. Some in the crowd interrupted Obama with chants of “Yes You Can,” a direct dig and twist of his 2008 campaign slogan “Yes We Can” which can be traced to “Sí Se Puede,” Cesar Chavez’s call to action when he began organizing farm workers in the 1960s. Nearly 20 DREAMers (a term that defines students and service members brought illegally to the U.S. as children, and risk or are in the process of being deported, but hope for citizenship if the DREAM Act passes) wore T-shirts with this message “Obama Deports DREAMers”. Indeed, this is the moment when the pent-up frustration, fear, and disappointment of broken promises burned some of the red meat and the President who threw it on the grill.



    Photo courtesy of @bestillplease
    DREAMers, who stood in silent protest during the president's speech, pose for a photo after his remarks at the NCLR Annual Conference.

    Interestingly, a straw poll conducted by NCLR revealed that 45% of attendees surveyed consider immigration a top issue affecting Latinos. Although I’m skeptical of straw polls (Mitt Romney won the historic Ames Straw Poll in Iowa only to lose the 2008 Republican nomination to Senator John McCain), these results reveal the complexity of Hispanic voters: they are not a “one trick”–in this case immigration–pony. Hispanics care about jobs, education, health care, social security, topics the President amply discussed. But here’s the rub: Latino voters–a complex and slippery voting block because of its diversity and historic low turnout–put a premium on immigration reform because the xenophobic tenor of the debate negatively impacts us all–legal, illegal, sixth generation New Mexican; whether we’re Cuban and automatically get asylum when the foot touches U.S. soil or university-educated South Americans pursuing graduate degrees in U.S. universities. New Jersey ending health insurance for legal, payroll, tax-paying immigrants is just one example of governmental and personal initiatives that target and discriminate against all immigrants, and in broad strokes, Latinos.

    I interviewed Jorge Ramos in 2009 for ABC News about Obama’s appearance on Al Punto, the first time a U.S. President went on a Spanish-language Sunday public affairs show. When I asked Jorge about Latinos’ dissatisfaction with Obama for failing to deliver immigration reform within his first year, the anchor and host said that while the leader of the free world needs Hispanics to win in 2012, they need him: “The only hope for twelve million undocumented workers is Barack Obama.”

    The fact that Mitt Romney, Tim Pawlenty, Jon Huntsman, and Newt Gingrich–potential 2012 GOP nominees–declined NCLR’s invitation seems to prove this point. Then again, if they had shown face, the backdraft from an audience, exhausted with being vilified by factions of the Republican party, may have charred them into beef jerky.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 
    July 28, 2011

    Contact:
    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    Housing and social service professionals among participants expected at counseling training 

    Washington, D.C.—To combat systemic barriers that prevent low-income individuals from receiving crucial financial counseling, the NCLR (National Council of La Raza) Homeownership Network Learning Alliance (NHNLA) will begin offering a financial training course to housing counselors and social service case managers who frequently work with this community. “Introduction to Client Counseling for Low-Income Families” is a three-day course designed to teach social service professionals the fundamentals of financial counseling, while training them in the one-on-one counseling approach. The new course was developed in conjunction with the National Endowment for Financial Education (NEFE), whose mission is to empower individual and family financial decision-making through every stage of life.

    “We’re working with professionals who offer low-income families assistance with issues such as housing, daycare, adoption, and workforce development, and giving them the skills to address the financial issues that often intersect with the services that they provide,” said Lautaro “Lot” Diaz, Vice President of Housing and Community Development at NCLR. “By training people who are already trusted advisors in their communities, we can more effectively reach individuals, make them more financially savvy, and help them make sound financial decisions.”

    Topics covered in the training include barriers to increasing wealth faced by low-income clients, the financial counseling process, client goal-setting and relationship-building, and developing a financial plan. The course also provides essential information about savings strategy, client income analysis, and filing taxes.

    “This is a unique strategy to broadly address the inability to get financial information out to low-income families,” said Diaz. “We’re serving them directly and enabling counselors to tailor their assistance to exactly what their clients need.”

    The first two courses will be offered in Los Angeles, Calif., and in Pittsburgh, Pa., in August and September respectively. The course costs $800, and a limited number of scholarships are available to participants. For more information about the course and available scholarships or to register, please visit the NHNLA website.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Latinos. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org, or follow us on Facebook and Twitter

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Julian Teixeira
    (202) 776-1812

     

    NOMINEES INCLUDE JESSICA ALBA, CHRISTINA AGUILERA, ANTONIO BANDERAS, CAMERON DIAZ, SELENA GOMEZ, JENNIFER LOPEZ, SOFÍA VERGARA, BRUNO MARS, RICKY MARTIN, PITBULL, AND MORE

    NBC to televise primetime special, co-hosted by Eva Longoria and George Lopez,
    to air Friday, September 16 from 8:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. EDT

    NEW YORK—The nominees for the 2011 NCLR (National Council of La Raza) ALMA Awards® were revealed today along with details for “Vote Your Way to VIP,” a new online voting system and contest. For the first time, fans will be able to vote for their favorites and the winners will be revealed during the one-hour primetime special airing Friday, September 16 from 8:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. EDT on NBC. The nomination categories have now been repositioned as “Favorite” rather than “Best,” as a nod to the fans who will help determine who will emerge victorious at this year’s ceremony.

    The NCLR ALMA Awards show is dedicated to honoring the spirit and accomplishments of some of the most prolific Latinos in the entertainment industry, spanning music, television, and film. Co-hosted by Eva Longoria and George Lopez, the telecast will celebrate the entertainers who have upheld and promoted a socially proactive image of Hispanic culture in today’s media.

    With the new online voting system, fans will now have the power to drive in enough votes to see their favorite stars, musical performers, and shows receive the recognition and prestige that have become hallmarks of the famed awards show. Additionally, with the “Vote Your Way to VIP” contest, fans who cast their votes will get the chance to win a VIP experience for two including airfare, hotel, VIP tickets to the show, and an invitation to the VIP Post-Party. To vote, please go to www.almaawards.com. On August 22, 2011, the Favorite Movie Category will be added to the voting form. All voting ends on September 5, 2011.

    Winners of the NCLR ALMA Awards will be determined by evaluating votes cast and Box Office, Nielsen, and Billboard rankings, and in consultation with the NCLR ALMA Awards Production Leadership Team. Selection rules and eligibility are posted at www.almaawards.com. Not all awards will be presented on-air during the NBC special. However, viewers can watch the remaining award presentations during the pre–television show streamed online via telemundo.com/almaawards.


    The executive producers of the NCLR ALMA Awards are Bob Bain, Eva Longoria, and Janet Murguía. NBCUniversal and its parent company, Comcast Corporation., which has had a national partnership with NCLR since 2006, play a key role as creative partners and investors in the production of the awards show.

    PepsiCo. is this year’s Presenting Sponsor. Additional sponsors include Target, McDonald’s, State Farm, General Motors Corporation, and Comcast Corporation.

    For additional information, including announcements about the presenters and performers at this year’s ceremony, please visit www.almaawards.com or follow the show on Twitter at #AlmaAwards. For embeddable clips and full episodes from NBC shows, please visit NBC.com’s official show site: http://www.nbc.com/shows.

    The nominees are:

    Favorite Movie Actor
    • Antonio Banderas—You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger
    • Demián Bichir—A Better Life
    • Bobby Cannavale—Win Win
    • Michael Peña—Battle: Los Angeles
    • Danny Trejo—Machete

    Favorite Movie Actress—Drama/Adventure
    • Jessica Alba—Machete
    • Penelope Cruz—Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides
    • Rosario Dawson—Unstoppable
    • Michelle Rodriguez—Battle: Los Angeles
    • Zoë Saldana—Takers

    Favorite Movie Actress—Comedy/Musical
    • Christina Aguilera—Burlesque
    • Cameron Diaz—Bad Teacher
    • Selena Gomez—Monte Carlo
    • Eva Mendes—The Other Guys
    • Alexa Vega—From Prada to Nada

    Favorite TV Series
    • CSI: Miami (CBS)
    • Desperate Housewives (ABC)
    • Modern Family (ABC)
    • Wizards of Waverly Place (Disney Channel)

    Favorite TV Reality, Variety, or Comedy Personality or Act
    • Christina Aguilera—The Voice (NBC)
    • George Lopez—Lopez Tonight (TBS)
    • Jennifer Lopez—American Idol (FOX)
    • Mario Lopez—Mario Lopez: Saved By the Baby (VH1)
    • Cesar Millan—Dog Whisperer With Cesar Millan (National Geographic Channel)

    Favorite TV Actor—Leading Role
    • Ricardo Chavira—Desperate Housewives (ABC)
    • Ian Gomez—Cougar Town (ABC)
    • Joshua Gomez—Chuck (NBC)
    • James Roday—Psych (USA Network)
    • Adam Rodriguez—CSI: Miami (CBS)

    Favorite TV Actor—Supporting Role
    • Oscar Nuñez—The Office (NBC)
    • Rico Rodriguez—Modern Family (ABC)
    • Michael Trevino—The Vampire Diaries (CW)
    • Tristan Wilds—90210 (CW)
    • David Zayas—Dexter (Showtime)

    Favorite TV Actress—Leading Role in a Drama
    • Cote de Pablo—NCIS (CBS)
    • Eva La Rue—CSI: Miami (CBS)
    • Francia Raisa—The Secret Life of the American Teenager (ABC Family)
    • Sara Ramirez—Grey’s Anatomy (ABC)
    • Sarah Shahi—Fairly Legal (USA Network)

    Favorite TV Actress—Leading Role in a Comedy
    • Selena Gomez—Wizards of Waverly Place (Disney Channel)
    • Victoria Justice—Victorious (Nickelodeon)
    • Demi Lovato—Sonny With a Chance (Disney Channel)
    • Naya Rivera—Glee (FOX)
    • Sofía Vergara—Modern Family (ABC)

    Favorite TV Actress—Supporting Role
    • Maria Canals-Barrera—Wizards of Waverly Place (Disney Channel)
    • Constance Marie—Switched at Birth (ABC Family)
    • Aubrey Plaza—Parks and Recreation (NBC)
    • Sarah Ramos—Parenthood (NBC)
    • Lauren Vélez—Dexter (Showtime)

    Favorite Male Music Artist
    • Taio Cruz
    • Enrique Iglesias
    • Bruno Mars
    • Ricky Martin
    • Pitbull

    Favorite Female Music Artist
    • Christina Aguilera
    • Selena Gomez
    • Jennifer Lopez
    • Naya Rivera
    • Shakira

    MEDIA CONTACTS

    For NBC:
    Sharon Pannozzo, NBC Entertainment Publicity, (212) 664-5152

    For the NCLR ALMA Awards:
    Jennifer Price-Keith, The Lippin Group, (323) 965-1990, jprice@lippingroup.com,
    or Julian Teixeira, Director of Communications, NCLR, (202) 776-1812, jteixeira@nclr.org
     

    ###


     


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    PARA DIFUSIÓN INMEDIATA

    Contacto:
    Julián Teixeira
    (202) 776-1812

     

    ENTRE LOS NOMINADOS SE ENCUENTRAN JESSICA ALBA, CHRISTINA AGUILERA, ANTONIO BANDERAS, CAMERON DÍAZ, SELENA GÓMEZ, JENNIFER LÓPEZ, SOFÍA VERGARA, BRUNO MARS, RICKY MARTIN, PITBULL, Y OTROS MÁS

    La cadena NBC emitirá el programa en horario estelar, presentado por Eva Longoria y George López, el viernes 16 de septiembre de 8 a 9 PM EDT

    NEW YORK— Hoy se revelaron los nominados a los premios ALMA® del NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza), junto con los detalles de un nuevo sistema de votación y concurso en línea, “Vote por VIP a su Manera (Vote Your Way to VIP)”. Por primera vez, los aficionados podrán votar por sus estrellas favoritas, y los ganadores se darán a conocer durante la emisión del programa en NBC, de una hora en horario estelar, el viernes 16 de septiembre de las 20:00 a las 21:00 horas tiempo estándar del este (EDT). Las categorías de nominación se han reposicionado como "favoritos" en lugar de "el mejor", para captar mejor la señal de asentimiento de los aficionados ayudando así a determinar quién saldrá victorioso en la ceremonia de este año.

    El espectáculo de los premios ALMA del NCLR se instituyó para honrar el espíritu y los logros de algunos de los artistas latinos más prolíficos de la industria del entretenimiento, la música, la televisión y el cine. Los presentadores serán Eva Longoria y George López, y la transmisión televisiva honrará a los artistas que han mantenido y promovido una imagen socialmente proactiva de la cultura hispana en los medios de comunicación de hoy.

    Con el nuevo sistema de votación en línea, ahora los aficionados podrán enviar votos suficientes para que sus estrellas, artistas musicales y programas favoritos reciban el reconocimiento y prestigio que se han convertido en sello de la famosa entrega de premios. Además, con el concurso " Vote por VIP a su Manera", los aficionados que votaron tendrán la oportunidad de ganar gratuitamente una experiencia VIP para dos personas al conseguir sus pasajes aéreos, estadía, entradas VIP para el espectáculo y una invitación para después de la fiesta VIP. Para votar, por favor visite www.almaawards.com. La categoría de Película Favorita se añadirá al formulario de votación el 22 de agosto de 2011. Las votaciones terminarán el 5 de septiembre de 2011.

    Los ganadores de los premios ALMA se determinarán mediante la evaluación de los votos emitidos y la taquilla, Nielsen, las clasificaciones de cartelera, y el asesoramiento del Equipo de Liderazgo de Producción de los premios ALMA del NCLR. Las reglas de selección y elegibilidad están publicadas en www.almaawards.com. No todos los premios se entregarán durante el programa especial televisivo de la NBC. Sin embargo, los espectadores podrán ver la entrega de los premios restantes durante el show preliminar de televisión transmitido en línea a través de telemundo.com/almaawards.

    Los productores ejecutivos de los premios ALMA son Bob Bain, Eva Longoria y Janet Murguía. NBCUniversal y su compañía matriz, Comcast Corporation, que han apoyado a nivel nacional al NCLR desde 2006, tienen un papel clave como socios creativos e inversores de la producción de la entrega de los premios.

    PepsiCo es el patrocinador presentador de este año. Otros patrocinadores incluyen a Target, McDonald’s, State Farm, General Motors Corporation, y Comcast Corporation.

    Para obtener información adicional sobre los anuncios de los presentadores y los artistas de la ceremonia de este año, por favor visite www.almaawards.com o siga el programa en Twitter en #AlmaAwards. Para clips embebidos y episodios completos de los programas de NBC, visite la página de programación oficial de NBC.com: http://www.nbc.com/shows.

    Los nominados son:

    Actor de cine favorito
    • Antonio Banderas—You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger
    • Demián Bichir—A Better Life
    • Bobby Cannavale—Win Win
    • Michael Peña—Battle: Los Angeles
    • Danny Trejo—Machete

    Actriz de cine favorita—drama/aventura
    • Jessica Alba—Machete
    • Penélope Cruz—Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides
    • Rosario Dawson—Unstoppable
    • Michelle Rodríguez—Battle: Los Angeles
    • Zoë Saldaña—Takers

    Actriz de cine favorita —comedia/musical
    • Christina Aguilera—Burlesque
    • Cameron Díaz—Bad Teacher
    • Selena Gómez—Monte Carlo
    • Eva Mendes—The Other Guys
    • Alexa Vega—From Prada to Nada

    Serie de televisión favorita
    • CSI: Miami (CBS)
    • Desperate Housewives (ABC)
    • Modern Family (ABC)
    • Wizards of Waverly Place (Disney Channel)

    Personalidad o actuación favorita de reality show, variedad o comedia
    • Christina Aguilera—The Voice (NBC)
    • George López—Lopez Tonight (TBS)
    • Jennifer López—American Idol (FOX)
    • Mario López—Mario Lopez: Saved By the Baby (VH1)
    • César Millán—Dog Whisperer With Cesar Millan (National Geographic Channel)

    Actor de televisión favorito—papel protagónico
    • Ricardo Chavira—Desperate Housewives (ABC)
    • Ian Gómez—Cougar Town (ABC)
    • Joshua Gómez—Chuck (NBC)
    • James Roday—Psych (USA Network)
    • Adam Rodríguez—CSI: Miami (CBS)

    Actor de televisión favorito—papel secundario
    • Oscar Núñez—The Office (NBC)
    • Rico Rodríguez—Modern Family (ABC)
    • Michael Treviño—The Vampire Diaries (CW)
    • Tristán Wilds—90210 (CW)
    • David Zayas—Dexter (Showtime)

    Actriz de televisión favorita —papel protagónico en drama
    • Cote de Pablo—NCIS (CBS)
    • Eva La Rue—CSI: Miami (CBS)
    • Francia Raisa—The Secret Life of the American Teenager (ABC Family)
    • Sara Ramírez—Grey’s Anatomy (ABC)
    • Sarah Shahi—Fairly Legal (USA Network)

    Actriz de televisión favorita —papel protagónico en comedia
    • Selena Gómez—Wizards of Waverly Place (Disney Channel)
    • Victoria Justice—Victorious (Nickelodeon)
    • Demi Lovato—Sonny With a Chance (Disney Channel)
    • Naya Rivera—Glee (FOX)
    • Sofía Vergara—Modern Family (ABC)

    Actriz de televisión favorita —papel secundario
    • María Canals-Barrera—Wizards of Waverly Place (Disney Channel)
    • Constance Marie—Switched at Birth (ABC Family)
    • Aubrey Plaza—Parks and Recreation (NBC)
    • Sarah Ramos—Parenthood (NBC)
    • Lauren Vélez—Dexter (Showtime)

    Artista musical favorito
    • Taio Cruz
    • Enrique Iglesias
    • Bruno Mars
    • Ricky Martin
    • Pitbull

    Artista musical favorita
    • Christina Aguilera
    • Selena Gómez
    • Jennifer López
    • Naya Rivera
    • Shakira

    CONTACTOS PARA LOS MEDIOS DE COMUNICACIÓN

    Para NBC:
    Sharon Pannozzo de NBC Entertainment Publicity, (212) 664-5152

    Para los premios ALMA del NCLR:
    Jennifer Price-Keith de The Lippin Group, (323) 965-1990, jprice@lippingroup.com,
    o Julián Teixeira, director de comunicaciones del NCLR, (202) 776-1812, jteixeira@nclr.org

     

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    NCLR’s 2011 Annual Conference has come and gone. Conference was a huge success, with a tremendous lineup of speakers. President Barack Obama, Arianna Huffington, Eva Longoria, and many others delivered memorable addresses.

    So much work goes into making Conference a great event, and attendees are always treated to an awesome program. From the Latino Family Expo, to the always informative Town Halls, to the engaging workshops, there is something for everyone.

    And if you missed any of the Conference events that were streamed live on the Internet, you can watch all of the videos here. You especially won’t want to miss the recording of President Obama’s speech at our Monday luncheon event. Watch the video below.

    Thanks again to everyone who made it to the Conference. And a special shout-out to everyone who participated online! This was the first time NCLR included a robust online coversation about the happenings at Conference.  

    Below is a slideshow of some our favorite moments at Conference.


     


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    One of the biggest draws of the NCLR Annual Conference is the wide array of substantive workshops, panel discussions, and meal events. Attendees also anticipate the numerous receptions and networking opportunities. This year was certainly no different, and perhaps the most popular party at Conference was the second annual LGBT and Allies Reception.

    This year, thanks to the support of the Gill Foundation, the NCLR LGBT and Allies Reception honored NCLR Board Member Catherine Pino. As a member of the LGBT and Latino communities, Pino has dedicated her life to fighting for equality and fairness. Pino seeks to advance corporate, philanthropic, and legislative efforts that mirror her deep commitment to social justice and civil rights issues. A quick look at her biography and accomplishments explains why she received this distinction. Pino has served on the boards of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute and the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation. She was also the first Latina board member and cochair of the Hetrick-Martin Institute in New York City, and now she currently serves on the Arcus Foundation board and the National Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce.

    NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía, as well as the Gill Foundation’s President and CEO Tim Sweeney, introduced Pino and delivered impassioned speeches about the need for more collaboration between the two communities and how Pino’s work has embodied that philosophy. Pino’s family and her partner Ingrid Duran were in the audience.

    After the program, attendees continued with their refreshments and networking, and that’s when the NCLR staff snapped photos of the veritable “Who’s Who” in the LGBT and Latino communities. Check out the slideshow below for more about this very important reception.


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    By Pedro Silva, Organizing and Capacity-Building Strategist

    It has been one week since California Governor Jerry Brown fulfilled a campaign promise to the thousands of young Latinos in his state by signing AB 130, a bill that would allow undocumented college students to access private financial aid. The National Council of La Raza (NCLR) applauds Gov. Brown for taking this first step toward ensuring equal access to education for all hardworking students. NCLR is hopeful that he will see this mission through by passing AB 131.

    “I'm committed to expanding opportunity wherever I can find it, and certainly these kinds of bills promote a goal of a more inclusive California and a more educated California,” Gov. Brown told reporters, according to the Los Angeles Times.

    It's important to remember, however, that while we celebrate this victory, we are far from finished with our work. This is an important benchmark in our race toward the passage of the California “DREAM Act,” but we have not crossed the finish line yet. We must continue to push Governor Brown and California’s state representatives to pass AB 131, allowing undocumented students access to state tuition aid.

    Still, it must be noted that signing this legislation is an investment in the future of California. Instead of penalizing young people for decisions that they had no control over, this law embraces talented, hardworking students regardless of immigration status and signals to them that they have a stake in the success of their state and their country. Enabling more students to move on to higher education creates a greater pool of talented young people who can contribute to the economic and social prosperity of California.

    This achievement was the result of hard work and NCLR has many of its Affiliates and volunteers to thank for the countless hours they spent on the ground advocating for this bill’s passage. For months, they participated in numerous statewide conference calls, planning meetings, and advocacy trainings to prepare for sit-downs with legislators and influencers in California. Last May, more than 300 delegates from various NCLR Affiliates across the state traveled to the state capitol to rally for the passage of the California “DREAM Act,” conducting well over 100 legislative visits. Their leadership and commitment to this issue undoubtedly served a huge role in the passage of this bill.

    We are proud of this important triumph for DREAM advocates, especially in the largest state in this nation. We hope that California continues to lead the way in advancing educational opportunities for all students and that politicians in other states and at the federal level take notice. 


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Julian Teixeira
    (202) 776-1812
    jteixeira@nclr.org


    Washington, D.C.—For the sake of the country, the health of our economy, and global financial stability, raising the debt ceiling was a necessary step. Although this was not the deal we believe would be best for America, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) recognizes the importance of raising the debt ceiling given that the prospect of default was far worse. However, it is deeply unfortunate and disappointing that the budget cuts contained within the compromise greatly affect the most vulnerable in our society, including low-income and Hispanic Americans.


    Going forward, we hope that lawmakers will put aside their partisan differences and develop a better, more balanced approach to resolving this nation’s budget crisis—one that includes a thoughtful strategy for raising revenue without reducing funding to crucial programs for low-income families, and eliminates loopholes for those Americans who can afford to pay their fair share of taxes.


    Finally, with the issues surrounding the debt ceiling resolved for the time being, we implore Congress and the administration to give their full attention to the issue of greatest concern to all Americans, including Latinos—fixing our broken economy and creating jobs.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 
    August 3, 2011 

    Contact:
    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    Federal action essential to assert authority and protect civil rights

    Washington, D.C.—On Monday, Aug. 1, the Department of Justice (DOJ) filed a lawsuit to block the implementation of HB 56, an anti-immigrant law signed by Gov. Robert Bentley (R–AL) of Alabama. Alabama’s law, which eclipses Arizona’s draconian SB 1070 as the harshest anti-immigrant legislation in the nation, provides local law enforcement with overly broad authority to investigate residents’ immigration statuses and opens the doors to racial profiling. HB 56—in clear violation of federal law—even goes a step further than SB 1070 in that it requires schools to collect information about the citizenship or immigration status of their students, effectively closing the schoolhouse doors to many of these children.

    “Alabama has chosen to walk down Arizona’s failed path, and is already facing multiple legal challenges that will hurt the state’s economy,” said Janet Murguía, President and CEO of NCLR (National Council of La Raza). “The Alabama legislature chose to enact an SB 1070 copycat that exploits the legitimate frustration with the broken immigration system and fails to deliver rational policy solutions. It encourages racial profiling and discrimination against even the youngest Alabamians and cements Alabama’s long-standing reputation as an intolerant, inhospitable place, especially for minorities, undoing the efforts of so many to improve that image. DOJ is taking an essential step to assert federal authority over immigration enforcement, and we implore the courts to make the right decision by striking down this unconstitutional legislation.”

    NCLR agrees with DOJ’s argument that the Alabama law could lead to harassment and discrimination, would place unnecessary burdens on federal agencies, and could discourage undocumented parents from enrolling their children in school. The courts have already blocked enforcement provisions of similar racial profiling bills in Arizona, Utah, Indiana, and Georgia. NCLR supports DOJ’s decision to challenge this unjust and dangerous law. However, this lawsuit magnifies the need for Congress and the administration to approve and enact comprehensive immigration reform.

    “Our nation is frustrated by federal inaction on immigration reform, but the response to federal inaction cannot be irresponsible state action,” concluded Murguía. “Our nation will be better off if legislators focus on the real issues and create viable solutions that fix immigration at the federal level.”

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

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    “Moving Forward, Together”
    2011 NCLR Líderes Summit at the NCLR Annual Conference

    By Berenice Bonilla, Program Lead, Líderes Initiative

    More than 400 young leaders left the nation’s capital last week empowered and energized to continue driving positive social change in communities across America. After a year of planning and fundraising, the students travelled to Washington, DC for the 2011 Líderes Summit at the NCLR Annual Conference. They came from California, North Carolina, Illinois, Oklahoma, Florida, Texas, New York, New Jersey, Arizona, New Mexico and Puerto Rico. Several Líderes youth talked at length about the Summit’s impact on the confidence levels of the students, as well as their renewed sense of purpose and newly inspired vision for personal and collective success.

    Washington, D.C. was an inspirational and apropos setting for the young Líderes to engage in thoughtful discussions about potential responses and solutions to the many challenges faced by Latino youth today. Featured speakers and student panelists encouraged participants to continue advocating on behalf of the Hispanic community in their home states and on their college campuses. Many of the speakers also delivered inspiring remarks about their own stories, including U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar whose moving words left students feeling motivated to continue pursuing leadership opportunities and following their dreams.

    The Summit featured 20 educational workshops with topics spanning eight issue areas that parallel NCLR’s core areas of work. Sessions taught students how to organize successful campus events, be effective public speakers, recruit more Latino students to their campuses, capture the media’s attention, and maximize new media for social advocacy purposes and networking. Students learned about a number of model community programs working to increase the number of Latinos entering college, decrease gang violence in Latino neighborhoods, decrease teen pregnancy rates, help students safeguard their sexual health, offer guidance to young Hispanic professionals seeking leadership opportunities, and more. The Summit’s informal check-in sessions focused on increasing participants’ professional skills, showing them how to improve their professional image, and teaching them to safeguard their personal information on online social networks.

    In addition, the youth celebrated Latino culture with ballet folklorico, Afro-Colombian dances, mariachi guitar, reggaeton and bachata, and performances by the renowned classical guitarist Berta Rojas. Participants also honored the musical and lyrical traditions throughout Latin America by presenting a range of acts at the Líderes Cultural Talent Showcase.

    There were two civic engagement–focused student panels that featured participants in NCLR’s youth-led advocacy campaigns who are working to increase awareness for Social Security and to decrease barriers to higher education. The Líderes Town Hall, “Forward Thinking: Discussing a Blueprint for Future Leadership,” allowed students to hear from Hispanic professionals in the fields of communications and public affairs, including José Antonio Tijerino, Norelie Garcia, Guillermo Torres, Felix Ortiz, and NCLR’s very own Delia de la Vara.

    One of the biggest highlight for students was a greeting by President Barack Obama, who made it a point to shake hands with Summit participants after his address at the NCLR Annual Conference Monday Luncheon on July 25. The students chanted, “Obama, Obama!” and expressed warm support for the nation’s commander-in-chief. After the event, the students posted pictures on Facebook and Twitter with messages urging the president’s renewed support for the “Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act.”  

    Check out the slideshow below for some of the more memorable moments of Líderes Summit 2011.


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    “Moving Forward, Together”
    2011 NCLR Líderes Summit at the NCLR Annual Conference

    By Berenice Bonilla, Program Lead, Líderes Initiative

    More than 400 young leaders left the nation’s capital last week empowered and energized to continue driving positive social change in communities across America. After a year of planning and fundraising, the students travelled to Washington, DC for the 2011 Líderes Summit at the NCLR Annual Conference. They came from California, North Carolina, Illinois, Oklahoma, Florida, Texas, New York, New Jersey, Arizona, New Mexico and Puerto Rico. Several Líderes youth talked at length about the Summit’s impact on the confidence levels of the students, as well as their renewed sense of purpose and newly inspired vision for personal and collective success.

    Washington, D.C. was an inspirational and apropos setting for the young Líderes to engage in thoughtful discussions about potential responses and solutions to the many challenges faced by Latino youth today. Featured speakers and student panelists encouraged participants to continue advocating on behalf of the Hispanic community in their home states and on their college campuses. Many of the speakers also delivered inspiring remarks about their own stories, including U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar whose moving words left students feeling motivated to continue pursuing leadership opportunities and following their dreams.

    The Summit featured 20 educational workshops with topics spanning eight issue areas that parallel NCLR’s core areas of work. Sessions taught students how to organize successful campus events, be effective public speakers, recruit more Latino students to their campuses, capture the media’s attention, and maximize new media for social advocacy purposes and networking. Students learned about a number of model community programs working to increase the number of Latinos entering college, decrease gang violence in Latino neighborhoods, decrease teen pregnancy rates, help students safeguard their sexual health, offer guidance to young Hispanic professionals seeking leadership opportunities, and more. The Summit’s informal check-in sessions focused on increasing participants’ professional skills, showing them how to improve their professional image, and teaching them to safeguard their personal information on online social networks.

    In addition, the youth celebrated Latino culture with ballet folklorico, Afro-Colombian dances, mariachi guitar, reggaeton and bachata, and performances by the renowned classical guitarist Berta Rojas. Participants also honored the musical and lyrical traditions throughout Latin America by presenting a range of acts at the Líderes Cultural Talent Showcase.

    There were two civic engagement–focused student panels that featured participants in NCLR’s youth-led advocacy campaigns who are working to increase awareness for Social Security and to decrease barriers to higher education. The Líderes Town Hall, “Forward Thinking: Discussing a Blueprint for Future Leadership,” allowed students to hear from Hispanic professionals in the fields of communications and public affairs, including José Antonio Tijerino, Norelie Garcia, Guillermo Torres, Felix Ortiz, and NCLR’s very own Delia de la Vara.

    One of the biggest highlight for students was a greeting by President Barack Obama, who made it a point to shake hands with Summit participants after he addressed the NCLR Annual Conference Monday Luncheon on July 25. The students chanted, “Obama, Obama!” and expressed warm support for the nation’s commander-in-chief. After the event, the students posted pictures on Facebook and Twitter with messages urging the president’s renewed support for the “Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act.”  

    Check out the slideshow below for some of the more memorable moments of Líderes Summit 2011.


    0 0

    “Moving Forward, Together”
    2011 NCLR Líderes Summit at the NCLR Annual Conference

    By Berenice Bonilla, Program Lead, Líderes Initiative

    More than 400 young leaders left the nation’s capital last week empowered and energized to continue driving positive social change in communities across America. After a year of planning and fundraising, the students travelled to Washington, DC for the 2011 Líderes Summit at the NCLR Annual Conference. They came from California, North Carolina, Illinois, Oklahoma, Florida, Texas, New York, New Jersey, Arizona, New Mexico and Puerto Rico. Several Líderes youth talked at length about the Summit’s impact on the confidence levels of the students, as well as their renewed sense of purpose and newly inspired vision for personal and collective success.

    Washington, D.C. was an inspirational and apropos setting for the young Líderes to engage in thoughtful discussions about potential responses and solutions to the many challenges faced by Latino youth today. Featured speakers and student panelists encouraged participants to continue advocating on behalf of the Hispanic community in their home states and on their college campuses. Many of the speakers also delivered inspiring remarks about their own stories, including U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar whose moving words left students feeling motivated to continue pursuing leadership opportunities and following their dreams.

    The Summit featured 20 educational workshops with topics spanning eight issue areas that parallel NCLR’s core areas of work. Sessions taught students how to organize successful campus events, be effective public speakers, recruit more Latino students to their campuses, capture the media’s attention, and maximize new media for social advocacy purposes and networking. Students learned about a number of model community programs working to increase the number of Latinos entering college, decrease gang violence in Latino neighborhoods, decrease teen pregnancy rates, help students safeguard their sexual health, offer guidance to young Hispanic professionals seeking leadership opportunities, and more. The Summit’s informal check-in sessions focused on increasing participants’ professional skills, showing them how to improve their professional image, and teaching them to safeguard their personal information on online social networks.

    In addition, the youth celebrated Latino culture with ballet folklorico, Afro-Colombian dances, mariachi guitar, reggaeton and bachata, and performances by the renowned classical guitarist Berta Rojas. Participants also honored the musical and lyrical traditions throughout Latin America by presenting a range of acts at the Líderes Cultural Talent Showcase.

    There were two civic engagement–focused student panels that featured participants in NCLR’s youth-led advocacy campaigns who are working to increase awareness for Social Security and to decrease barriers to higher education. The Líderes Town Hall, “Forward Thinking: Discussing a Blueprint for Future Leadership,” allowed students to hear from Hispanic professionals in the fields of communications and public affairs, including José Antonio Tijerino, Norelie Garcia, Guillermo Torres, Felix Ortiz, and NCLR’s very own Delia de la Vara.

    One of the biggest highlight for students was a greeting by President Barack Obama, who made it a point to shake hands with Summit participants after he addressed the NCLR Annual Conference Monday Luncheon on July 25. The students chanted, “Obama, Obama!” and expressed warm support for the nation’s commander-in-chief. After the event, the students posted pictures on Facebook and Twitter with messages urging the president’s renewed support for the “Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act.”  


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    August 4, 2011

    Contact:
    Kathy Mimberg
    (202) 776-1714
    kmimberg@nclr.org

    Project portrays Hispanic families’ struggles to provide children with healthy food

    Washington, D.C.—Recounting their efforts to put healthy food on the table, families in Idaho, Texas, and the District of Columbia opened a personal window for NCLR (National Council of La Raza) experts to explore the obstacles that Latino parents face in trying to provide nutritious meals for their children. In documenting these conversations, NCLR concluded that many Hispanic parents put fresh fruit, vegetables, and whole grains at the top of their grocery lists but—for reasons such as accessibility, cost, time, and transportation—they cannot count on providing their children with these healthy staples every day.

    “Latinos make up the largest share of children living in hunger in the United States. At the same time, nearly two-fifths of them are overweight or obese,” said Kara Ryan, Senior Research Analyst for NCLR’s Health Policy Project, and author of the report. “These are alarming and unacceptable problems that can be addressed by taking a more comprehensive policy approach to the child nutrition crisis. How can we as a nation allow hunger and poor nutrition to dim the bright futures of our young people?”

    Nearly 40 percent of Latino children are overweight or obese. Out of the one million children in the United States who are hungry, 40 percent are Hispanic. With Comer Bien: The Challenges of Nourishing Latino Children and Families, NCLR emphasizes that there are multiple, concurrent factors that contribute to both problems. Families suffering from food insecurity are less likely to be able to access affordable, healthy foods, so their children often go hungry or eat meals of cheaper but less nutritious foods. Hispanic parents describe their experiences in a short documentary film and booklet as well as in a series of video vignettes that will be distributed weekly for 10 weeks.

    Key findings based on NCLR experts’ interviews with families in Caldwell, Idaho; El Paso, Texas; San Antonio, Texas; and the District of Columbia are:

    • Insufficient household income prevents families from eating well. Some Latino parents and grandparents suffer from job insecurity, cyclical unemployment, cutbacks due to the economic downturn, and fixed incomes that cannot cover basic family expenses.
    • Poor community infrastructure often complicates families’ access to nutritious food. Healthy food is not always as available in Latino neighborhoods in the same quantity, price, and quality as in other parts of town, leading to “food deserts” for some Hispanic families.
    • Lack of adequate transportation requires families to spend extra time and money buying food. Latino parents often reported a choice between shopping in neighborhood stores—which may have higher prices or few fresh food options—and spending more time traveling to stores with better prices or selection.
    • Food assistance plays a positive role in children’s nutritional intake. Nearly all of the families interviewed described federal nutrition programs, particularly WIC and SNAP, and free or low-cost school-based meals as essential to their ability to feed their children healthy foods.

    Families experiencing food insecurity reported that they sacrificed food quality for quantity. With little food to go around, parents said that they would buy and prepare inexpensive, calorie-dense, and filling foods that they can make last; fresh produce—which costs more and spoils more quickly—was often considered an unrealistic option for meals every day.

    “Latino parents and grandparents recognize how important it is for children to have nutritious food so that they can be healthy and have a good start in life. The dinner table is at the heart of every Hispanic family as the place to share food, love, and life lessons. As a society, it is in everyone’s best interest that the dinner table offer all of our children good, nutritious meals,” said Ryan.

    For this project, NCLR worked with five Affiliate community-based organizations in the target regions: Community Council of Idaho in Caldwell; La Clínica del Pueblo and Mary’s Center in the District of Columbia; La Fe Policy Research and Education Center in San Antonio; and La Fe Preparatory School/Centro de Salud Familiar La Fe, Inc. in El Paso. Each of these organizations provides programs and services to Latino and other families in the region.

    NCLR advocates for a comprehensive approach that brings together communities and tailors solutions to families’ needs in order to improve the lives of Latino children who are hungry or are at risk for health problems due to poor nutrition. For more information about NCLR’s work on Latino child nutrition, please visit the NCLR nutrition web page. Sign up to receive NCLR's health and nutrition updates, including one of 10 new video vignettes each week.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter

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    PARA DIFUSIÓN INMEDIATA
    4 de agosto de 2011

    Contacto:
    Kathy Mimberg
    (202) 776-1714
    kmimberg@nclr.org

    El proyecto describe cómo las familias hispanas luchan para proveer comida sana a sus hijos

    Washington, D.C.— Haciendo un recuento de sus esfuerzos para llevar comida sana a la mesa, familias de Idaho, Texas y el District of Columbia hablaron con los expertos del NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) para que éstos pudieran entender mejor los obstáculos que enfrentan los padres latinos para proveer comidas nutritivas a sus hijos. Al documentar estas conversaciones, el NCLR concluyó que muchos padres hispanos quieren comprar frutas frescas, verduras y granos integrales, pero por razones tales como su accesibilidad, costo, la falta de tiempo y el transporte, no pueden proveer a sus hijos estos alimentos sanos todos los días.

    “Los latinos representan el mayor porcentaje de niños que sufre de hambre en los Estados Unidos. Al mismo tiempo, casi dos quintas partes de ellos padecen de sobrepeso u obesidad", dijo Kara Ryan, analista investigadora del proyecto de política de salud del NCLR y autora del informe. "Estos son problemas alarmantes e inaceptables que se pueden abordar mediante la adopción de un enfoque político más amplio a la crisis de la nutrición infantil. ¿Cómo podemos, como nación, permitir que el hambre y la desnutrición empañen el brillante futuro de nuestros jóvenes?”

    Casi el 40% de los niños latinos padece de sobrepeso u obesidad. Del millón de niños que sufren de hambre en los Estados Unidos, el 40% es hispano. Con el informe Comer bien: los retos de alimentar a los niños latinos y sus familias, el NCLR enfatiza en que hay múltiples factores concurrentes que contribuyen a ambos problemas. Las familias que carecen de seguridad alimentaria tienen menos probabilidad de tener acceso a alimentos nutritivos asequibles, por lo que, a menudo, sus hijos pasan hambre o comen alimentos más baratos y menos nutritivos.

    Los padres hispanos describen sus experiencias en un documental corto y un folleto, así como en una serie de viñetas de vídeos que se distribuirán semanalmente durante 10 semanas. El video y el folleto están en inglés, pero los expertos del NCLR están disponibles para ser entrevistados sobe este tema en español.

    A continuación se listan las principales conclusiones de las entrevistas de los expertos del NCLR a las familias en Caldwell, Idaho; El Paso, Texas; San Antonio, Texas; y el District of Columbia:

    • Un ingreso familiar insuficiente impide que las familias coman bien. Algunos padres y abuelos latinos sufren de inseguridad en el empleo, desempleo cíclico, recortes debido a la recesión económica, e ingresos fijos que no les permiten cubrir los gastos básicos de la familia.
    • La falta de infraestructura en las comunidades frecuentemente complica el acceso de las familias a alimentos nutritivos. La comida sana no está siempre disponible en los barrios latinos en la misma cantidad, al mismo precio o en semejante calidad como en otras partes de la ciudad, lo que da lugar a los denominados "desiertos alimentarios" para algunas familias hispanas.
    • La falta de transporte exige a las familias gastar más dinero y tiempo para comprar los alimentos. Los padres latinos a menudo informaron que tenían que elegir entre comprar en las tiendas del barrio, las que pueden tener precios más altos o menos opciones de alimentos frescos, o dedicar más tiempo para hacer las compras en tiendas que quedan más lejos pero tienen mejores precios o selección de alimentos. 
    • La ayuda alimentaria desempeña un papel positivo en la ingesta nutricional de los niños. Casi todas las familias entrevistadas describieron los programas federales de nutrición, especialmente WIC (Programa Especial de Nutrición Suplementaria para Mujeres, Bebés y Niños) y SNAP (Programa de Asistencia de Alimentación Suplementaria), así como las comidas escolares gratuitas o de bajo costo como esenciales para ayudarles a dar de comer alimentos sanos a sus hijos. 

    Las familias que sufren de inseguridad alimentaria informaron que sacrificaban la calidad de los alimentos por la cantidad. Con tan poca comida para todos, los padres dijeron que tienen que comprar y preparar comidas duraderas y de bajo costo, ricas en calorías y que los dejen satisfechos. Los productos frescos, los cuales cuestan más y se estropean más rápidamente, fueron con frecuencia considerados una opción poco realista para la consumición diaria.

    "Los padres y abuelos latinos reconocen lo importante que es que los niños coman alimentos nutritivos para que puedan estar sanos y tener un buen comienzo en la vida. La mesa está en el corazón de todas las familias hispanas y es el lugar para compartir la comida, el amor y las lecciones de vida. Como sociedad, es por nuestro bien que debemos llevar a la mesa alimentos sanos y nutritivos para todos nuestros niños", dijo Ryan.

    En este proyecto, el NCLR trabajó con cinco organizaciones comunitarias afiliadas: Community Council of Idaho en Caldwell; La Clínica del Pueblo y Mary’s Center en el District of Columbia; La Fe Policy Research and Education Center en San Antonio; y La Fe Preparatory School/Centro de Salud Familiar La Fe, Inc. en El Paso. Cada una de estas organizaciones ofrece programas y servicios a los latinos y otras familias en la región.

    El NCLR aboga por un enfoque integral que una a las comunidades y cree soluciones que cubran las necesidades de las familias para mejorar la vida de los niños latinos que sufren de hambre o que están en riesgo de padecer problemas de salud debido a la mala nutrición. Para más información acerca del trabajo del NCLR sobre la nutrición infantil de los latinos, visite la página de Internet de nutrición del NCLR. Regístrese para recibir actualizaciones sobre salud y nutrición, incluyendo una de las 10 nuevas viñetas de vídeos semanales.

    El Consejo Nacional de La Raza (NCLR, por sus siglas en inglés)–la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos– trabaja para mejorar las oportunidades de los estadounidenses hispanos. Para más información sobre el NCLR, por favor visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter

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  • 08/04/11--09:47: Who Matters In This Country?
  • By Jennifer Ng'andu, Deputy Director of the Health Policy Project, NCLR

    As Congress wrestles to find budget solutions for our country in the next few months, a central moral question remains. Most of the coverage of debt ceiling discussions has focused more on political histrionics and gamesmanship than on the real lives at stake. I wonder if the needs of Americans will shine through after all of the mudslinging is done. The stakes are high for working class and poor families. While the Obama administration and many members in Congress (at least those who weren’t intent on wreaking havoc on the economy to make a point—about what, I’m not sure) worked on a debt ceiling deal to address the needs of Wall Street, it’s important to think about those whose well-being is most affected by the drive to cut spending, even for essential programs.

    Our country faces staggering racial and ethnic inequity in health coverage. Although Latinos averaged 15% of the overall population between 2007–2009, they represented nearly one in three (32%) uninsured Americans during the same period. Most of this disparity is due to Latinos’ concentration in jobs that don’t offer health care coverage and other benefits. Medicaid has often stood as the only other bridge to health insurance. The program is essential for one in six Americans, providing coverage for 58 million individuals in our country, and more than one in four Latinos (26.5%). NCLR recently noted that the impact is even greater among many of the most vulnerable Latinos. For instance, the program covers nearly half of all Latino children (46.2%), the majority of whom (58.5%) live below the federal poverty level.

    These numbers drive home how important Medicaid is to our communities across the country, but we can’t forget that there are people behind the data. The Alliance for a Just Society illustrates this in their new publication, Medicaid Makes a Difference: Protecting Medicaid, Advancing Racial Equity, which shares the stories of patients, health providers, and community leaders who experience firsthand the benefits of Medicaid to communities of color. The document tells the story of Eduardo Magaña, 17, who understands that his performance at school is tied to his ability to obtain good preventive health care through the program, and Sagrario, whose coverage to treat her ovarian cancer is only possible due to her Medicaid.

    Knowing the health care struggles for people without insurance, my heart was aflutter with the news of a debt ceiling deal that protected Medicaid. Latinos across the country answered the call to action when cuts were proposed. Letters and calls poured into congressional offices, and for a brief moment, we won. It didn’t take long for my glee to turn into a sinking feeling. For the immediate future, negotiators of the debt deal did the right thing, avoiding helter-skelter cuts to several essential programs. But the devilish details reveal that while Medicaid is safe—at least for today—the mechanics of this deal and lack of political will to go to the mat for the most vulnerable could put millions of Americans at risk of harm.

    After an initial $1 trillion spending cap on all national programs, it is now up to a “super committee” to carve an additional $1.5 trillion out of our budget. This committee will need to be superhuman to overcome the partisan gridlock and absence of civility that led to this point. Despite symbolic nods toward “shared sacrifice,” Republicans shunned many—actually, all—options, and the first round of cuts from the debt ceiling deal will disproportionately affect the poor and vulnerable, potentially driving those working class families struggling to join the middle class into poverty. Revenue raisers that could reform and simplify our tax system and help to pay off our debt have not been a serious part of the conversation. And make no mistake: as this deal moves forward, Medicaid is still on the table to be cut in the second round of discussions. Ironically, the first round of cuts could force more people into poverty and swell Medicaid participation rates. The way Washington works these days, that scenario could make Medicaid more vulnerable to cuts.

    If budgets are about values, as we are told, a decision to gut Medicaid after allowing continued tax breaks for the wealthiest Americans will give us clear indications for whom Congress is fighting and how Congress really feels about working class families. Should Congress pull the rug out from under Medicaid, federal lawmakers will be sending a brutal message to Latinos—and the many others who stand to suffer—about who really matters in this country.
      


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Narissa Johnson, Southwest Key Programs 
    (512) 934-4445, njohnson@swkey.org
    David Castillo, NCLR, (202) 776-1771 
    Sarah-Frances Wallace, Lowe’s Companies, Inc. (704) 758-4339   

    NCLR and Lowe’s Charitable and Educational Foundation help a middle school build brighter futures 

    AUSTIN, Texas—The East Austin College Prep Academy will host a community celebration from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. on Thursday, August 11, to unveil its newly renovated school library. The festivities for Viva the Books! will take place at the school, located in Southwest Key’s El Centro de Familia at 6002 Jain Lane in Austin. The event is open to the public at no charge and will feature a book giveaway, a voter registration drive, a display of student work, wandering storytellers, and theatrical and dance performances. 

    Texas Representative Joaquín Castro (District 125) will join Dr. Juan Sanchez, Chair of the East Austin College Prep Academy Board of Directors and El Presidente/CEO and Founder of Southwest Key Programs, and a representative from the Lowe’s Austin branch at a brief ribbon-cutting ceremony which will be followed by an opportunity for families to tour the new library. The Latino Arts Preservation Program will perform a Ballet Folklorico dance and a theatrical rendition of Where the Wild Things Are with narration in Spanish.

    The library renovations were made possible through a $25,000 grant from NCLR (National Council of La Raza) and the Lowe’s Charitable and Educational Foundation. Funds were used to refurbish the school’s library and associated computer research lab, as well as to purchase new library display racks, chairs, carpeting, carts, books, and periodicals.

    The East Austin College Prep Academy is an innovative, tuition-free charter middle school that aims to successfully prepare all students, regardless of economic background, for a rigorous high school curriculum, graduation, and ultimately success in college and career. According to research cited by the American Library Association, strong library media programs help close the achievement gap for poor and minority students, particularly when it comes to reading scores at the high school level.

    The East Austin College Prep Academy is one of four schools to have its library renovated this year with funds provided by the Lowe’s Charitable and Educational Foundation. Each school received a $25,000 grant for the renovation. The other schools are the George I. Sanchez Charter High School in Houston, and the Los Angeles Leadership Academy and the Camino Nuevo Charter Academy in Los Angeles.

    MEDIA ADVISORY

    WHAT: Community celebration of the renovation of the East Austin College Prep Academy, including a book give-away, a voter registration drive, ribbon-cutting ceremony, and theatrical and dance performances.

    WHEN: Thursday, August 11, 5:00–8:00 p.m.

    WHERE: Southwest Key’s El Centro de Familia
    6002 Jain Lane
    Austin, TX 78721

    WHO: Dr. Juan Sanchez, Chair of the East Austin College Prep Academy Board
               of Directors and El Presidente/CEO and Founder of Southwest Key Programs
    Texas Representative Joaquín Castro (District 125)
    Representative from the Lowe’s Austin branch
    Performances by the Latino Arts Preservation Program


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    About NCLR
    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

    About LOWE’S
    Lowe’s supports the communities it serves through programs that focus on K–12 public education and community improvement projects. The company’s signature education grant program, Lowe’s Toolbox for Education, has brought more than $5 million in grants to K–12 public schools every year since its inception in 2005. “Lowe’s Heroes” employee volunteers support local community projects and national nonprofit partners such as Habitat for Humanity International and the American Red Cross. In 2010, Lowe’s and the Lowe’s Charitable and Educational Foundation together contributed more than $30 million to support communities in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. To learn more, visit Lowes.com/socialresponsibility.


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