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    By Jessica Mayorga, Director of Marketing, NCLR

    (This was first posted to the ALMA Awards 411 Blog.)

    “To understand the future, we have to go back in time.” Do you recognize these lyrics? If you’ve been listening to the radio lately, you’ve most likely heard the new Pitbull song on killer rotation. These lyrics are from “Back in Time,” the song that headlines the soundtrack for the upcoming film, Men in Black III. Pitbull is an ALMA star who finds a way every day to amaze us with new examples of success. We’re proud of Pit for landing this great opportunity and for continuing to demonstrate that Latinos in the entertainment industry are working hard and achieving much-deserved recognition among diverse audiences.

    The lyrics to this song are so appropriate for an ALMA star: he’s telling us that you can’t ignore history or where you came from—you have to embrace it so that you can navigate through the opportunities of the future. Latinos have long had a presence in this nation and are major contributors to the arts and entertainment. Pit reminds us not to ignore that.

    If you caught the Behind the Music episode on Pitbull last month, you can understand the personal significance this message may have had in his life. His life wasn’t easy, and he didn’t always make the best choices, but he grew from that past and has become one of today’s leading entertainers—and beyond that, has become a smart businessman, entrepreneur, and strategist. So this week we honor our friend, repeat ALMA awardee Pitbull, as we look forward to an ever-growing career that is only getting started.

    Dale, Pit!


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    Contact:
    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    Today, the House Ways and Means Committee passed legislation originally introduced by Rep. Sam Johnson which would strip hardworking, taxpaying families of their right to claim the refundable Child Tax Credit if they pay taxes with an ITIN (Individual Taxpayer Identification Number). H.R. 1956 would harm more than four million Latino children in families who earn an average of $21,000 per year, costing each family approximately $1,800. As noted in the expert testimony, 92% of the children who would be affected by this legislation are U.S. citizens. This bill will not become law unless it passes both the House of Representatives and the Senate and is signed by the president.

    The refundable Child Tax Credit prevents millions of Hispanic families from falling deeper into poverty and helps low-income, working families feed and house their children so that they can grow into the strong and healthy adult workers our country needs.

    “This proposal will harm innocent Latino children,” said Eric Rodriguez, Vice President of the Office of Research, Advocacy, and Legislation at NCLR (National Council of La Raza). “Eliminating the right of hardworking Latino families to claim the needed tax credit should be offensive to all voters, especially to Latino voters.”

    Read below for the roll-call vote tally on Budget Reconciliation Legislative Recommendations Relating to Social Security Number Requirements for Refundable Portion of the Child Tax Credit:

    Votes in Favor: 22

    Dave Camp, R–MI, Chairman      Aye
    Wally Herger, R–CA                   Aye
    Sam Johnson, R–TX                   Aye
    Kevin Brady, R–TX                     Aye
    Paul Ryan, R–WI                         Aye
    Devin Nunes, R–CA                    Aye
    Pat Tiberi, R–OH                          Aye
    Geoff Davis, R–KY                     Aye
    Dave G. Reichert, R–WA            Aye
    Charles W. Boustany Jr., R–LA  Aye
    Peter J. Roskam, R–IL                 Aye
    Jim Gerlach, R–PA                      Aye
    Tom Price, R–GA                         Aye
    Vern Buchanan, R–FL                Aye
    Adrian Smith, R–NE                     Aye
    Aaron Schock, R–IL                    Aye
    Lynn Jenkins, R–KS                    Aye
    Erik Paulsen, R–MN                     Aye
    Kenny Marchant, R–TX               Aye
    Rick Berg, R–ND                          Aye
    Diane Black, R–TN                      Aye
    Tom Reed, R–NY                         Aye

    Votes Opposed: 12

    Sander Levin, D–MI, Ranking Member  Nay
    Fortney Pete Stark, D–CA                    Nay
    Jim McDermott, D–WA                          Nay
    John Lewis, D–GA                               Nay
    Richard E. Neal, D–MA                         Nay
    Lloyd Doggett, D–TX                            Nay
    Mike Thompson, D–CA                         Nay
    John B. Larson, D–CT                          Nay
    Ron Kind, D–WI                                    Nay
    Bill Pascrell Jr., D–NJ                            Nay
    Shelley Berkley, D–NV                         Nay
    Joseph Crowley, D–NY                       Nay

    Charles B. Rangel, D–NY         No Recorded Vote
    Xavier Becerra, D–CA             No Recorded Vote
    Earl Blumenauer, D–OR           No Recorded Vote

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                                                Contact: Kathy Mimberg
    April 18, 2012                                                                                                                                       (202) 776-1714
                                                                                                                                                                 kmimberg@nclr.org

     

    Washington, D.C.—The Best Buy Children’s Foundation and NCLR (National Council of La Raza) are proud to launch the sixth NCLR–Best Buy Emerging Latino Leaders Scholarship Program. The scholarship will award a total of $25,000 to four graduating Hispanic high school seniors from throughout the United States. The deadline for submissions is Friday, June 1, 2012, and the winners will be announced in July.

    “We all know that a college education opens crucial doors in life, so we are committed to helping Latino youth gain access to such an important tool,” said Delia Pompa, NCLR Senior Vice President for Programs. “One of the difficult challenges that we face is the rising cost of tuition, which keeps so many Latino students from continuing their education and securing a stable future. The scholarships offered by the partnership between the Best Buy Children’s Foundation and NCLR are a perfect example of the types of solutions that we need. Educational resources like these make all the difference in helping Latino youth achieve their dreams for a better life, for themselves and for their families.”

    In 2012, four scholarships will be awarded to students who submit essays demonstrating exemplary leadership and civic engagement through the use of social media and/or technology in their communities:

    • One first-prize “Liderazgo” scholarship in the amount of $15,000
    • One second-prize “Excelencia” scholarship in the amount of $5,000
    • Two third-prize “Adelante” scholarships in the amount of $2,500 each

    Online applications and essays will be accepted via NCLR’s Líderes website. Applicants must submit an essay detailing their roles as leaders and advocates for the Latino community. For more information, and to apply online, please visit the NCLR–Best Buy Emerging Latino Leaders Scholarship Program page.

    The NCLR Líderes Initiative promotes the NCLR–Best Buy Emerging Latino Leaders Scholarship Program, which aims to increase the educational attainment of Latino youth by providing scholarships to graduating high school students who have been accepted into postsecondary education institutions for the 2012–2013 academic year. Líderes is a national youth leadership program designed to increase opportunities for Latino youth that will maximize their influence as leaders in the United States.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    PARA DIVULGACIÓN INMEDIATA                                                                               PARA MÁS INFORMACIÓN:
    18 de abril de 2012                                                                                                         Kathy Mimberg
                                                                                                                                          (202) 776-1714
                                                                                                                                          kmimberg@nclr.org

     

    Washington, D.C.—La Fundación Best Buy de Niños y el NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) lanzan con orgullo la sexta convocatoria del Programa de Becas del NCLR y Best Buy de Líderes Latinos Emergentes. El total de la beca, $25,000, se dividirá entre cuatro estudiantes hispanos graduados de la escuela secundaria en los Estados Unidos. La fecha límite para solicitar estas becas es el viernes 1 de junio de 2012, y los ganadores se anunciarán en julio.

    “Todos sabemos que la educación universitaria abre puertas críticas en la vida, y por ello, nuestro compromiso es ayudar a que la juventud latina tenga acceso a tan importante herramienta como lo es la educación universitaria”, dijo Delia Pompa, vicepresidenta sénior de programas del NCLR. “El aumento del costo de la matrícula es uno de retos más difíciles que enfrentamos y que evita que muchos estudiantes latinos continúen sus estudios y consigan un futuro estable. Las becas que se ofrecen a través de la asociación del NCLR y la Fundación Best Buy de Niños son un ejemplo ideal del tipo de soluciones que necesitamos. Los recursos educacionales como estos hacen la diferencia para ayudar a los jóvenes latinos a alcanzar su sueño de tener una vida mejor, tanto para ellos mismos como para sus familias”.

    En 2012, se concederán cuatro becas a estudiantes que hayan enviado un ensayo donde muestren un liderazgo ejemplar y un compromiso cívico a través del uso de medios sociales y/o tecnología en sus comunidades:
                •   Un primer premio “Liderazgo” de $15,000
                •   Un segundo premio “Excelencia” de $5,000
                •   Dos terceros premios “Adelante” de $2,500 cada uno

    Se aceptarán las solicitudes y los ensayos a través de la página de Internet Líderes del NCLR. Los participantes deberán enviar un ensayo detallando su papel como líderes y defensores de la comunidad latina. Para más información y para hacer la solicitud en línea, por favor visite la página del Programa de Becas del NCLR y Best Buy de Líderes Latinos Emergentes.

    La iniciativa Líderes del NCLR promueve el Programa de Becas del NCLR y Best Buy de Líderes Latinos Emergentes cuya intención es aumentar los logros educacionales de los jóvenes latinos, al proveer becas a los estudiantes graduados de preparatoria que hayan sido aceptados en una institución de educación superior para el año académico 2012–2013. Líderes es un programa nacional de liderazgo juvenil diseñado para aumentar las oportunidades de los jóvenes latinos y maximizar su influencia como líderes en los Estados Unidos.

    El NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) es la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos y trabaja para mejorar sus oportunidades. Para más información sobre el NCLR, por favor visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

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    At a time when access to higher education is being questioned as a core American value, high school seniors around the country continue to seek help supporting themselves through college. To aid those seniors, the Best Buy Children’s Foundation and NCLR have again partnered for the sixth annual NCLR–Best Buy Emerging Latino Leaders Scholarship Program. Last year, Marcos Montalvo (TX), Isabella Girlado (NC), Lucero Sifuentes (NC), and Max Fresquez (NM) won this financial support for their great contributions to the Latino community.

    The program offers up to $25,000 to graduating high school seniors across the nation based on their demonstrated commitment to Hispanics and aptitude to lead effective change in the issues affecting this community. NCLR and the Best Buy Children’s Foundation seek to empower future generations of Latino game-changers and raise awareness about the necessity of increasing the civic engagement of minority youth.

    The program will award four scholarships to students who demonstrate an admirable use of social media and/or technology:

    • One grand-prize winner will receive a one-time payment of $15,000.
    • One winner will receive a one-time payment of $5,000.
    • Two winners will each receive a one-time payment of $2,500.

    Applications are due between April 18 and June 1, 2012. The winners will be announced in July.

    If you think that you are a leading voice for your generation, tell us why and apply now! Or find more information at the NCLR Líderes Initiative website. The Líderes Initiative supports this scholarship program and is committed to bringing opportunities for leadership and advancement to Latino youth. 


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Camila Gallardo
    Office: (305) 573-7329
    Cell: (305) 215-4259
    cgallardo@nclr.org

    MIAMI—Today, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) launched its South Florida Mobilize to Vote (M2V) campaign, an effort aimed at registering Hispanics in Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties for the upcoming 2012 elections. Florida is poised once again to play a decisive role in the national elections, and the much sought-after Latino vote will no doubt heavily influence those results. The cornerstone of the M2V campaign is bridging the gap for Hispanics who are eligible but have not yet registered to vote. 

    “Among the three counties where Mobilize to Vote will focus its efforts in South Florida—Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach—there are over 133,000 eligible Hispanics who have yet to register to vote, an incredible number when you consider the tight vote margins we’ve witnessed in recent elections,” said Natalie Carlier, South Florida Regional Coordinator for NCLR’s Civic Engagement department. “That’s why this region of the state is such an important focal point of our campaign,” continued Carlier.

    NCLR recently announced its new national civic engagement campaign, Mobilize to Vote, which includes on-the-ground programs in Florida, Colorado, Nevada, Pennsylvania, Texas, California, and North Carolina. Voter registration and get-out-the-vote efforts will include direct contact with potential registrants and voters through canvassing, service providers and community organizations, and digital platforms.
    “While we are focused on registering Hispanics for the upcoming election, ultimately what we want to see as a result of our efforts is sustained participation in the civic process. We want Hispanics to have proportional influence on our political system. While we are more than 50 million strong, there is still a large gap between those who are eligible and those who register, as well as between those who register and those who actually turn out to vote,” said Carlier.

    In addition to registering voters, M2V will also engage in voter education, providing important information to Latinos on the issues that affect the community most, and in voter mobilization—turning Latinos out on Election Day.

    “It is important that Hispanics participate; if we want to have a voice in the process and if we want to help influence the development of local, state, and national policies, then we have to become informed and involved,” concluded Carlier.

    Mobilize to Vote plans to register approximately 80,000 new Hispanic voters in Florida.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Joseph Rendeiro, NCLR
    (202) 776-1566

    Adela de la Torre, NILC
    (213) 400-7822

    Plaintiffs to Discuss their Concerns as Supreme Court takes on Arizona Law

    Washington—Affected individuals, civil rights advocates, and leading litigators will gather outside the Capitol to observe the second anniversary of SB 1070, Arizona’s racial profiling law. On Wednesday, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments on the Department of Justice’s challenge to SB 1070. Plaintiffs in cases that would be affected by a Supreme Court ruling will discuss their concerns about anti-immigrant laws in their states, and press federal legislators for a comprehensive solution to fix our broken immigration system.

    MEDIA ADVISORY

    WHO:
    Marielena Hincapié, Executive Director, National Immigration Law Center
    Paul Bridges, Mayor, Uvalda, Georgia, and plaintiff in GLAHR et al v. Bentley et al, a civil rights coalition challenge to HB 87
    Lisa Navarette, Advisor to the President, National Council of La Raza
    Luz Santiago, Church Pastor in Mesa, Arizona, and plaintiff in Friendly House et. al. v. Whiting et. al., the civil rights coalition’s challenge to SB 1070
    Andre Segura, Staff attorney, ACLU, and lead litigator in challenges to anti-immigrant laws in Utah, Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina
    Hilary Shelton, Senior Vice President for Policy and Advocacy, NAACP

    WHAT: Press conference to commemorate second anniversary of SB 1070, discuss issues with anti-immigrant legislation.

    WHEN: Monday, April 23, 2012, 1:00 p.m.

    WHERE: Capitol Visitor’s Center, Room 200 (House Side), Washington, DC 20002

    TO RSVP: Media should RSVP to Adela de la Torre at delatorre@nilc.org or 213-400-7822.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

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    PARA DIFUSIÓN INMMEDIATA

    Contacto
    Julián Teixeira
    (202) 776-1812
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    Que Limita a Los Contribuyentes Inimigrantes a Reclamar El Crédito Tributario Por Hijos

    Washington—Hoy el Comité de Medios y Arbitrios de la Cámara de Representantes aprobó el proyecto de ley originalmente presentada por representante Sam Johnson, que despojaría a las familias de los trabajadores que pagan impuestos a reclamar el Crédito Tributario por Hijos si pagan sus impuestos con el ITIN (Número de Identificación Personal del Contribuyente). El proyecto de ley 1956 perjudicaría a más de cuatro millones de niños latinos de las familias que ganan un promedio anual de $21,000, lo que corresponde a una deducción de $1,800 por familia. Como señaló el testimonio de expertos sobre el tema, el 92% de los niños que se verían afectados por esta legislación son ciudadanos estadounidenses. Este proyecto de ley no se convertirá en ley a menos que la Cámara de Representantes y el Senado la aprueben y sea ratificada por el presidente.

    El Crédito Tributario Reembolsable por Hijos impide que millones de familias hispanas se hundan más en la pobreza al ayudar a las familias de bajos ingresos a alimentar y proveer un techo a sus hijos para que ellos se conviertan en los adultos trabajadores, fuertes y sanos que nuestra nación necesita.

    “Este proyecto de ley perjudicará a niños hispanos inocentes”, dijo Eric Rodríguez, vicepresidente de la Oficina de Investigación, Defensa y Legislación de NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza). “La eliminación del derecho de las familias de los trabajadores a reclamar el crédito fiscal que esas familias necesitan es ofensivo a todos los votantes y, especialmente, a los latinos”.

    Lea a continuación el recuento de la votación nominal sobre Budget Reconciliation Legislative Recommendations Relating to Social Security Number Requirements for Refundable Portion of the Child Tax Credit (Recomendaciones sobre la Reconciliación del Presupuesto Legislativo Relativas a los Requisitos del Número de la Seguridad Social respecto a la Porción Reembolsable del Crédito Tributario por Hijos):

    Votos a favor: 22
    Dave Camp, Republicano–Michigan, Presidente Sí
    Wally Herger, R–CA Sí
    Sam Johnson, R–TX Sí
    Kevin Brady, R–TX Sí
    Paul Ryan, R–WI Sí
    Devin Nunes, R–CA Sí
    Pat Tiberi, R–OH Sí
    Geoff Davis, R–KY Sí
    Dave G. Reichert, R–WA Sí
    Charles W. Boustany Jr., R–LA Sí
    Peter J. Roskam, R–IL Sí
    Jim Gerlach, R–PA Sí
    Tom Price, R–GA Sí
    Vern Buchanan, R–FLA Sí
    Adrian Smith, R–NE Sí
    Aaron Schock, R–IL Sí
    Lynn Jenkins, R–KS Sí
    Erik Paulsen, R–MN Sí
    Kenny Marchant, R–TX Sí
    Rick Berg, R–ND Sí
    Diane Black, R–TN Sí
    Tom Reed, R–NY Sí

    Votos en contra: 12
    Sander Levin, Demócrata–MI, Miembro de mayor rango No
    Fortney Pete Stark, D–CA No
    Jim McDermott, D–WA No
    John Lewis, D–GA No
    Richard E. Neal, D–MA No
    Lloyd Doggett, D–TX No
    Mike Thompson, D–CA No
    John B. Larson, D–CT No
    Ron Kind, D–WI No
    Bill Pascrell Jr., D–NJ No
    Shelley Berkley, D–NV No
    Joseph Crowley, D–NY No

    Charles B. Rangel, D–NY Voto no registrado
    Xavier Becerra, D–CA Voto no registrado
    Earl Blumenauer, D–OR Voto no registrado

    El Consejo Nacional de La Raza (NCLR, por sus siglas en inglés) –la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles en los Estados Unidos– trabaja para mejorar las oportunidades de los estadounidenses hispanos. Para mayor información sobre el NCLR, por favor visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

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  • 04/23/12--07:27: The @NCLR Weekly Top 10
  • The Week in Social Media, April 14-20

    Storified by NCLR · Mon, Apr 23 2012 10:33:28

    1.
    New polling out shows that 54% of #Latinos support marriage equality. Check out the report! http://ow.ly/ahtK6 #LGBT #LATISMNCLR
    2.
    Congratulations to... | Facebookundefined
    3.
    13 million Americans are out of jobs? So, why does Congress want to cut job training programs?! http://ow.ly/ahtfDNCLR
    4.
    While the US... | FacebookWednesday, April 25 at 10:30am at US Supreme Court
    5.
    The benefits of health care reform for Latinos explained. #LatinoHealth http://ow.ly/i/zYzpNCLR
    6.
    A little more than... | FacebookWASHINGTON -- A review of about 300,000 pending deportation cases resulted in 2,609 men and women being allowed to stay in the U.S. -- at...
    7.
    For many #Latinas #EqualPay Day not only represents a wage gap but also unpaid wages. http://ow.ly/alM1h @MomsRising #LATISMNCLR
    8.
    So, just how does... | FacebookSign Up Facebook helps you connect and share with the people in your life.
    9.
    Questions about what to do after college if you're undocumented? @mycuentame has you covered. http://ow.ly/ajTEcNCLR
    10.
    A new report by... | FacebookSign Up Facebook helps you connect and share with the people in your life.

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  • 04/23/12--14:12: SB 1070 Turns Two
  • SB 1070 Turns Two

    Storified by NCLR · Mon, Apr 23 2012 18:02:21

    Today marks the second anniversary of Arizona's anti-immigrant "Papers, Please" law, also known as SB 1070. To observe the infamous law, NCLR joined the National Immigration Law Center, the ACLU, the NAACP and Uvalda, GA Mayor Tom Bridges at a press conference on Capitol Hill. The press conference kicked off a week of events related to the Supreme Court arguments, which the Court will hear on Wednesday.

    Follow #Justice4AZ on Twitter for all the latest on this very important case.

    NCLR's Elena Lacayo live-tweeted from the event. 
    Lisa Navarette, special advisor to president and CEO, Janet Murguia, opened up the press conference.
    Lisa Navarette of @NCLR speaking at today's press conference. #Justice4AZ http://yfrog.com/gzw4yjdgj4aNewAmerica
    The first speaker was Marielena Hincapié, executive director, National Immigration Law Center.
    Hincapie of @NILC_org addresses the press conference, speking out against #SB1070. #Justice4AZ http://yfrog.com/od7mbirj4aNewAmerica
    Hincapié  opened her remarks by saying that  Gov. Jan Brewer set off a political brush fire two years ago when she signed #SB1070 into law.
    Marielena Hincapie of @NILC_org :"our country's basic values of fairness & equality are at stake before the Sup Court this week" #Justice4AZ4aNewAmerica
    Hincapie : these laws are simply unamerican. A patchwork of 50 different immigration laws will cause havoc in our country. #Justice4AZ4aNewAmerica
    Ali Noorani, of the Center for Community Change, snapped a photo of the packed press room. 
    Row of cameras, the country is watching. Great #sb1070 presser by @nilc_org #justice4az http://pic.twitter.com/Rmtn0d55Ali Noorani
    After Hincapié, Mayor Tom Bridges of Uvalde, Ga, took to the podium.  Bridges is a plaintiff in GLAHR et al  v. Bentley et al, a civilrights coalition challenge to HB 87.  He is also the 2012 recipient of the NCLR Capital Awards. Bridges is a fearless leader who wants to see SB 1070, and copycats, struck down.
    Paul Bridges, GOP Mayor of Udalva, Georgia, speaks out against #HB87, an#AZ copycat. #Justice4AZ http://yfrog.com/nzpbdisxj4aNewAmerica
    Bridges: our founding fathers rightfully put #immigration under federal responsibility. #Justice4AZ #SB10704aNewAmerica
    Today marks two years after the passage of #SB1070 . Day of mourning for all Americans. #Justice4AZ4aNewAmerica
    Up next was Luz Santiago, a church pastor inMesa, Arizona, and also a plaintiff in FriendlyHouse et. al. v. Whiting et. al., the civil rights coalition’schallenge to SB 1070.
    Luz Santiago : "When I see what the legislators have done to Arizona, it saddens me." #Justice4AZ http://yfrog.com/obm6oiqj4aNewAmerica
    Santiago's remarks were passionate. She represented the many faith voices who are appalled at passage of the SB 1070.
    Santiago: "At a Wendy's a man told me, You Mexican, go back where you came from. I'm Puerto Rican, American born" #Justice4AZ #SB10704aNewAmerica
    Santiago, pastor of church in Mesa : "I've seen the racism that has come as a consequence of #SB1070 ." #Justice4AZ4aNewAmerica
    Santiago: "this threatens our 1st amndmnt rights as pastors & ministers. If someone comes to our congregation, we welcome them" #Justice4AZ4aNewAmerica
    The NAACP's Hilary Shelton closed the press conference, but not before Hincapié  chimed in to say that HB 87, Alabama's copycat legislation, must be repealed and not just amended. 
    "HB87 must be repealed. You cannot tweak hate." @nclr @RI4A @4aNewAmerica #Justice4AZ http://instagr.am/p/JxXi6fOaoU/Pablo Manriquez
    Keep following the conversation all week long at #Justice4AZ. And, participate in our day of online action tomorrow, Tuesday, 4/25.

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    On Wednesday, Arizona’s anti-immigrant “papers, please” law, also known as SB 1070, will get its day in court when the federal government argues its case against the Grand Canyon State. This week also marks the second anniversary of the notorious racial-profiling law, and to observe this, we are hosting a blog carnival dedicated to highlighting the fallout from the law’s implementation as well as what’s at stake should it be upheld.

    At NCLR, we have long advocated for reforming our broken immigration system, but doing so requires a careful approach that is rooted in preserving the civil liberties of all people, whether undocumented or not. Arizona’s SB 1070 is devoid of this thoughtfulness and instead promotes discrimination against all people of color, including citizens. Simply put, SB 1070 is un-American and violates the nation’s foundation of civil rights.

    We are in need of reform that fixes problems at the federal level, not one that fosters a confusing patchwork of state legislation. We are also in need of reform that underscores our commitment to equal treatment under the law, regardless of what we look like or where we come from. Striking down Arizona’s “papers, please” law is the first step in making that reform a reality. If the struggle for civil rights has taught us anything, it is that the federal government—not the states—is the entity best-suited to protect our civil liberties.

    We are pleased to be hosting this very important blog carnival that showcases the strong coalition of advocates and civil rights groups that have banded together to fight this terrible law. The posts that follow examine various aspects of the policy, including the legal arguments for striking down SB 1070, the effect of the law on communities in Arizona, and what’s at stake should the Supreme Court decide the law is constitutional. The posts represent a broad cross-section of individuals dedicated to fighting for just immigration policies. We'll be updating this post as we receive more entries.

    Please read, comment, and share these posts with your family, friends, and neighbors. Help us send the message to Congress that it must do its job and pass federal immigration legislation to prevent any more states from enacting discriminatory laws like SB 1070.

    Thank you!
     
    *****

    Two Years Later, the Fight Continues - Reform Immigration for America

    Arizona's "Papers Please" Immigration Law Goes to the Supreme Court - Tara Tidwell Cullen, National Immigrant Justice Center

    Implications of April 25 Supreme Court Argument on Arizona Immigration Law - Pili Tobar, America's Voice

    SB 1070 Turns Two - NCLR


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Camila Gallardo
    cgallardo@nclr.org
    (305) 573-7329

    Houston—Participants of NCLR’s (National Council of La Raza) Escalera Program: Taking Steps to Success will once again participate in a Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)–focused job-shadowing experience on April 24–25 with employees of Houston-based Shell Oil Company. The Escalera Program is a national after-school program that aims to increase educational achievement and promote career planning among Latino youth by providing students with resources and assistance in meeting their educational goals. At NCLR Affiliate KIPP Houston High School, students who enroll in the Escalera Program during the second semester of their junior year must earn a high school diploma, complete a minimum of 80 hours of work or internship experience, and enroll in a postsecondary institution in order to graduate from the program.

    Nineteen Escalera participants from KIPP Houston will be matched with members of the Shell Hispanic Employee Network who will provide mentoring and a hands-on learning experience at Shell’s Woodcreek location. The two-day program provides a pivotal opportunity for students to learn about possible future career paths within a STEM framework.

    “We are proud to partner once again with Shell Oil Company on the job-shadowing experience for our Escalera participants. Shell has been a steadfast partner of NCLR in promoting the development of an educated and well-prepared Latino workforce,” said Simon Lopez, NCLR Senior Director of Workforce and Leadership Development.

    “In partnering with NCLR and the KIPP Academy in Houston, our Shell employees have the opportunity to mentor bright young students as they build their confidence and skills. This exposure and encouragement from Shell will hopefully increase the likelihood that many of these young leaders will consider careers in the energy industry. This is a ‘win-win’ for all,” said Francene Young, Shell Vice President of Upstream Talent and U.S. Diversity.

    Shell Oil Company has been a strong supporter of the KIPP Houston Escalera Program. Retired Shell Engineer Paul Spicer and his wife Kathy are mainstays of the program, having devoted countless hours to it since its inception. When this year’s Escalera students graduate next month, one will receive a $500 scholarship, an annual award named in the Spicers’ honor.

    “The Shell job-shadowing experience provides important motivation for our students; having that local investment and support will no doubt have a positive impact on their future success,” said Lopez.

    For more information about the NCLR Escalera Program, please visit www.nclr.org/escalera.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    On Wednesday, Arizona’s anti-immigrant “papers, please” law, also known as SB 1070, will get its day in court when the federal government argues its case against the Grand Canyon State. This week also marks the second anniversary of the notorious racial-profiling law, and to observe this, we are hosting a blog carnival dedicated to highlighting the fallout from the law’s implementation as well as what’s at stake should it be upheld.

    At NCLR, we have long advocated for reforming our broken immigration system, but doing so requires a careful approach that is rooted in preserving the civil liberties of all people, whether undocumented or not. Arizona’s SB 1070 is devoid of this thoughtfulness and instead promotes discrimination against all people of color, including citizens. Simply put, SB 1070 is un-American and violates the nation’s foundation of civil rights.

    We are in need of reform that fixes problems at the federal level, not one that fosters a confusing patchwork of state legislation. We are also in need of reform that underscores our commitment to equal treatment under the law, regardless of what we look like or where we come from. Striking down Arizona’s “papers, please” law is the first step in making that reform a reality. If the struggle for civil rights has taught us anything, it is that the federal government—not the states—is the entity best-suited to protect our civil liberties.

    We are pleased to be hosting this very important blog carnival that showcases the strong coalition of advocates and civil rights groups that have banded together to fight this terrible law. The posts that follow examine various aspects of the policy, including the legal arguments for striking down SB 1070, the effect of the law on communities in Arizona, and what’s at stake should the Supreme Court decide the law is constitutional. The posts represent a broad cross-section of individuals dedicated to fighting for just immigration policies. We'll be updating this post as we receive more entries.

    Please read, comment, and share these posts with your family, friends, and neighbors. Help us send the message to Congress that it must do its job and pass federal immigration legislation to prevent any more states from enacting discriminatory laws like SB 1070.

    Thank you!
     
    *****

    Two Years Later, the Fight Continues - Reform Immigration for America

    Arizona's "Papers Please" Immigration Law Goes to the Supreme Court - Tara Tidwell Cullen, National Immigrant Justice Center

    SB 1070 Turns Two - NCLR


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  • 04/24/12--13:13: Don’t Hate, Collaborate!
  • By Stephanie Pollick

    With pressure to get to the top of the Billboard charts, stay relevant, and outshine their peers, you’d think that today’s hottest musicians would have to constantly knock each other out of the way to guarantee their own success. But the list of nominees for this year’s Billboard Latin Music Awards shows us that being the best doesn’t mean pushing others down.

    On April 26, we will see many collaborations from our favorite artists highlighted at the Billboard Latin Music Awards. From Don Omar and Lucenzo’s “Danza Kuduro” to Jennifer Lopez and Pitbull’s “Ven A Bailar,” Hispanic stars show that they can be successful by supporting each other’s success. These collaborations not only bring us the best danceable hits, but also remind the American Latino community as a whole of the importance of sharing ideas and helping each other out.

    It’s especially nice to see seasoned artists take budding new stars under their wings. Fellow nominees Jennifer Lopez, Shakira, and Enrique Iglesias have all collaborated with ALMA Award–winner Pitbull when he got his start, and now he’s paying it forward. We’ve seen this mentorship in the collaborations he’s produced with Nayer, a fellow Cuban-American singer. “Give Me Everything” has consistently topped the charts and has been nominated in several categories for the upcoming Billboard Latin Music Awards.

    Another young star with multiple nominations this year is Prince Royce, whose collaboration with Daddy Yankee in “Ven Conmigo” last year brought us a great mix of romantic bachata melodies and reggaeton rhythms. We would love to see more collaborations from him! And while we’re dreaming up collaborations, maybe Esperanza Spalding, the multitalented jazz bassist and singer who created quite a buzz as Best New Artist at last year’s GRAMMYs will team up with some fellow Latinos to give us a fresh sound!

    This is a great direction for American Latino artists, and we are excited to see how far these musicians can get by working together.


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    Contact:
    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    Today, the Supreme Court of the United States will begin hearing oral arguments in the landmark case, Arizona v. United States, to decide whether Arizona’s controversial anti-immigrant legislation, SB 1070, unlawfully encroaches on the federal government’s authority to enforce immigration policy. NCLR (National Council of La Raza) thinks that the Supreme Court should uphold the need for our country to have one immigration policy that is conducted without violating the civil rights of our fellow Americans or our country’s immigrants. The court should overturn SB 1070 and send a strong message to the proponents of similar racial profiling bills—passed in states such as Georgia, South Carolina, and Alabama—that legalizing discrimination will not stand.

    “There is only one acceptable outcome in this case—the Supreme Court should uphold the Constitution and affirm that immigration enforcement must be handled at the federal level,” said Janet Murguía, President and CEO of NCLR. “The answer to fixing our broken immigration system cannot be a patchwork of racial profiling laws. These laws have caused great harm to Latino families and other residents of these states. Unconstitutional bills like SB 1070 are false solutions that distract from the only real solution—comprehensive immigration reform at the federal level.”

    NCLR has been a strong actor in the movement to push back against this extreme legislation, leading one of the boycotts that cost the state of Arizona millions of dollars in revenue, joining amicus briefs in support of the federal government’s lawsuits against these states, and working with community-based organizations to respond to the needs of local families. In collaboration with NCLR Affiliates, community advocates, and the civil rights, labor, religious, business, and law enforcement communities, NCLR’s efforts helped block numerous attempts in Arizona to push additional anti-immigrant legislation.

    “Today’s hearing is the culmination of a two-year battle for many of us in Arizona to overturn this cruel and senseless law. As a lifelong resident of that state, I have seen firsthand the pain and suffering SB 1070 has caused—the harassment and abuse of innocent victims, the separation of families, and the devastation of businesses and communities. The Supreme Court must put a stop to this and reassert the authority of the federal government when it comes to immigration,” stated NCLR Board Chair Daniel R. Ortega, Jr.

    While much attention has been focused on Arizona and the handful of states that followed a similar path, 31 states have rejected or declined to advance SB 1070 copycats, including seven states with Republican supermajority legislatures. Mounting evidence of the high cost and economic losses of these laws, combined with growing opposition from the civil rights, faith, business and law enforcement communities have contributed to the defeat of these legislative proposals.

    For more information, please consult these NCLR materials:

    The Wrong Approach: State Anti-Immigrant Legislation in 2011
    One Year Later: A Look at SB 1070 and Copycat Legislation
    • “National Copycat Landscape

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    To wrap up National Minority Health Month, NCLR is proudly hosting a blog carnival with our friends and partners to celebrate recent progress toward eliminating health disparities for underserved communities—and talk frankly about the challenges that remain. From Wednesday, April 25 through Friday, April 27, each day the NCLR blog will feature posts written by our staff and other health, consumer, civil rights, and provider advocates committed to promoting health equity.

    Welcome to the Health Equity Can’t Wait! blog carnival! In the spirit of National Minority Health Month—a nationwide campaign from our friends in the Office of Minority Health—members and friends of the Health Equity and Accountability Act (HEAA) Community Working Group are taking to the blogosphere to talk about the opportunities and challenges we face in realizing a country where everyone has an equal opportunity to be healthy and thrive. 

    The good news is that there is much to celebrate. We recently commemorated the second anniversary of the health care law, the Affordable Care Act, which is already making a difference for millions in the communities we serve and stands to benefit millions more when it’s fully rolled out. Last fall, we applauded the “Health Equity and Accountability Act” (H.R. 2954), reintroduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by the Congressional Tri-Caucus (members of the Black, Hispanic, and Asian Pacific American Caucuses), which builds upon the foundation for health equity laid by the health care law. We expect the Senate version of the legislation to be introduced this spring. Finally, April also marks the one-year anniversary of the launch of the Department of Health and Human Services Action Plan to Reduce Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities and National Stakeholder Strategy for Achieving Health Equity, two strategic plans that represent our nation’s first coordinated roadmap to reducing health disparities.

    Despite these advances, our work is only beginning. Gaps in health care access and quality carry a large economic cost and devastating human toll for racial and ethnic minorities and other communities. These barriers are often compounded by factors such as sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, citizenship and immigration status, primary language, geographic location, weight, age, disability, and socioeconomic status and income. The result is that millions of Americans do not reach their potential to live healthy, full, and productive lives.

    That’s why the HEAA Community Working Group is lifting health equity as a central goal in the movement for improved health care and health outcomes. Our group is comprised of nearly 200 national, state, local, and territorial advocates for the elimination of health disparities for racial and ethnic minorities and other underserved communities. Over the next three days, we will feature different perspectives from our members on questions such as whether health is a basic civil right, how we can take a holistic approach to disparities elimination, and what strategies and resources are available to advance a health equity agenda.

    ****

    Today, we kick things off by asking: What is your organization or community doing to advance a health equity mission?

    Working Toward Health Equity Together by Quynh Chi Nguyen, Program and Policy Associate, and Aurelia Aceves, National Urban Fellow, Community Catalyst

    Promoting the Health Care Law Today because Health Equity Can’t Wait by Sinsi Hernández-Cancio, Director of Health Equity, Families USA

    Farmworker Justice: Advancing Health Equity through Education and Advocacy by Alexis Guild, Migrant Health Policy Analyst, Farmworker Justice

    Maryland Has Said—Now is the Time for Health Equity! by Leni Preston, Chair, Maryland Women’s Coalition for Health Care Reform

    United We Stand: Achieving Health Equity for All by Kellan Baker, MPH, MA, Health Policy Analyst, LGBT Research and Communications Project at the Center for American Progress; Patrick Paschall, Esq., Policy Advocate, National Gay and Lesbian Task Force; and Harper Jean Tobin, Esq., Policy Counsel, National Center for Transgender Equality

    Health Equity is a Matter of Reproductive Justice by Natalie D. Camastra, Reproductive Justice Public Policy Fellow, National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health

    Making the Healthy Choice the Easy Choice: Eliminating Health Disparities by Jeffrey Levi, Ph.D., Executive Director, Trust for America's Health

    African American Elder Health Disparities by Delane Sims Founder/Chair, Senior Moments

    Our Communities Count: Advancing Health Equity by Improving Data by Rebecca Spence, Reproductive Justice Fellow, Asian Pacific Islander American Health Forum 

    Health Equity Can’t Wait: Supporting A Health Equity Agenda In Wisconsin by Lacy Langbecker, MSW, Field Student/Intern, Wisconsin Alliance for Women's Health

    P.S. Save the date! On Friday, April 27 from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. EDT, help us cap off National Minority Health Month by joining our Twitter chat! Follow the hashtag #HealthEquityNow to be part of the conversation. We’ll be re-tweeting and sharing your thoughts! New to Twitter? Create an account or check out some frequently asked questions to get started.


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    To wrap up National Minority Health Month, NCLR is proudly hosting a blog carnival with our friends and partners to celebrate recent progress toward eliminating health disparities for underserved communities—and talk frankly about the challenges that remain. From Wednesday, April 25 through Friday, April 27, each day the NCLR blog will feature posts written by our staff and other health, consumer, civil rights, and provider advocates committed to promoting health equity.

    Welcome to the Health Equity Can’t Wait! blog carnival! In the spirit of National Minority Health Month—a nationwide campaign from our friends in the Office of Minority Health—members and friends of the Health Equity and Accountability Act (HEAA) Community Working Group are taking to the blogosphere to talk about the opportunities and challenges we face in realizing a country where everyone has an equal opportunity to be healthy and thrive. 

    The good news is that there is much to celebrate. We recently commemorated the second anniversary of the health care law, the Affordable Care Act, which is already making a difference for millions in the communities we serve and stands to benefit millions more when it’s fully rolled out. Last fall, we applauded the “Health Equity and Accountability Act” (H.R. 2954), reintroduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by the Congressional Tri-Caucus (members of the Black, Hispanic, and Asian Pacific American Caucuses), which builds upon the foundation for health equity laid by the health care law. We expect the Senate version of the legislation to be introduced this spring. Finally, April also marks the one-year anniversary of the launch of the Department of Health and Human Services Action Plan to Reduce Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities and National Stakeholder Strategy for Achieving Health Equity, two strategic plans that represent our nation’s first coordinated roadmap to reducing health disparities.

    Despite these advances, our work is only beginning. Gaps in health care access and quality carry a large economic cost and devastating human toll for racial and ethnic minorities and other communities. These barriers are often compounded by factors such as sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, citizenship and immigration status, primary language, geographic location, weight, age, disability, and socioeconomic status and income. The result is that millions of Americans do not reach their potential to live healthy, full, and productive lives.

    That’s why the HEAA Community Working Group is lifting health equity as a central goal in the movement for improved health care and health outcomes. Our group is comprised of nearly 200 national, state, local, and territorial advocates for the elimination of health disparities for racial and ethnic minorities and other underserved communities. Over the next three days, we will feature different perspectives from our members on questions such as whether health is a basic civil right, how we can take a holistic approach to disparities elimination, and what strategies and resources are available to advance a health equity agenda.

    ****

    Today, we kick things off by asking: What is your organization or community doing to advance a health equity mission?

    Working Toward Health Equity Together by Quynh Chi Nguyen, Program and Policy Associate, and Aurelia Aceves, National Urban Fellow, Community Catalyst

    Promoting the Health Care Law Today because Health Equity Can’t Wait by Sinsi Hernández-Cancio, Director of Health Equity, Families USA

    Farmworker Justice: Advancing Health Equity through Education and Advocacy by Alexis Guild, Migrant Health Policy Analyst, Farmworker Justice

    Maryland Has Said—Now is the Time for Health Equity! by Leni Preston, Chair, Maryland Women’s Coalition for Health Care Reform

    United We Stand: Achieving Health Equity for All by Kellan Baker, MPH, MA, Health Policy Analyst, LGBT Research and Communications Project at the Center for American Progress; Patrick Paschall, Esq., Policy Advocate, National Gay and Lesbian Task Force; and Harper Jean Tobin, Esq., Policy Counsel, National Center for Transgender Equality

    Health Equity is a Matter of Reproductive Justice by Natalie D. Camastra, Reproductive Justice Public Policy Fellow, National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health

    Making the Healthy Choice the Easy Choice: Eliminating Health Disparities by Jeffrey Levi, Ph.D., Executive Director, Trust for America's Health

    African American Elder Health Disparities by Delane Sims Founder/Chair, Senior Moments

    Our Communities Count: Advancing Health Equity by Improving Data by Rebecca Spence, Reproductive Justice Fellow, Asian Pacific Islander American Health Forum (APIAHF)

    Health Equity Can’t Wait: Supporting A Health Equity Agenda In Wisconsin by Lacy Langbecker, MSW, Field Student/Intern, Wisconsin Alliance for Women's Health

    P.S. Save the date! On Friday, April 27 from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. EDT, help us cap off National Minority Health Month by joining our Twitter chat! Follow the hashtag #HealthEquityNow to be part of the conversation. We’ll be re-tweeting and sharing your thoughts! New to Twitter? Create an account or check out some frequently asked questions to get started.


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    To wrap up National Minority Health Month, NCLR is proudly hosting a blog carnival with our friends and partners to celebrate recent progress toward eliminating health disparities for underserved communities—and talk frankly about the challenges that remain. Today, bloggers answer the question: What is your organization or community doing to advance a health equity mission?

    by Quynh Chi Nguyen, Program and Policy Associate & Aurelia Aceves, National Urban Fellow

    Community Catalyst is proudly taking part in the Health Equity Can’t Wait! blog carnival celebrating National Minority Health Month. Participating bloggers are health, consumer, civil rights, and provider advocates committed to promoting health equity.

    From 2003 to 2006, the cost of racial and ethnic health disparities and resulting premature deaths was $1.24 trillion nationally. Despite national and local efforts to address disparities, people of color continue to experience poorer health than their white counterparts, including higher rates of infant mortality, lower life expectancy and increased prevalence of chronic diseases. If nothing is done to address racial and ethnic health disparities, these problems are likely to worsen as the diversity of the population grows.

    Reducing racial and ethnic health disparities includes providing quality and affordable health care to communities of color. According to a recent report, communities of color comprise “about one-third of the U.S. population and more than half of the people who are uninsured.” While the Affordable Care Act (ACA) promises sweeping changes to the health care system, health equity cannot be addressed through implementation of the law alone – changes must happen across society and should also include improvements to health. This means addressing the social determinants of health, such as employment, education, access to healthy foods, and safe neighborhoods.

    Over the past five years Community Catalyst’s work to advance health equity has focused on helping the most vulnerable consumers, including people of color and those who face barriers to care because of their immigrant status or primary language. We have provided leadership and support to state and local consumer organizations, policymakers and foundations that are working to guarantee access to health care for everyone.

    The best change occurs when the communities most affected are involved. Health equity will be achieved through full participation by communities of color and their engagement in the policy making process and implementation of the ACA. We strongly promote the participation of and partnership with communities of color to our partners. To better support state and local advocates, we are working to identify the best ways to engage communities of color in implementation of the ACA. In addition, we partner with foundations to provide financial support and technical assistance to state advocacy coalitions and encourage them to engage communities of color. This focus is reflected in grant requirements for two of our programs: Consumer Voices for Coverage, a joint initiative with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the Affordable Care Act Implementation Fund.

    Additionally health equity is incorporated into the goals for all of our programs:

    • We have joined with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation on the Roadmaps to Health Community Grants program to provide funding to organizations working to address social or economic factors that impact the health of people in their community. For example, advocates in Missouri identified that one key factor in maintaining employment, and consequently good health, is access to transportation to and from work. Many communities of color rely on public transportation, but this need often goes unfulfilled. Missouri advocates are using their grant funds to expand public transportation to these underserved communities.
    • Our Hospital Accountability Team is currently working to ensure federal rules require non-profit hospitals to engage community members and leaders directly, as they research and plan strategies to address a wide range of issues that impact community health—transportation, access to health care and healthy foods, for example—that often hit harder in communities of color.
    • To assist advocates on the ground engaging in the development of their state health insurance Exchange under the ACA, our policy team recently developed six principles to help create Exchanges that are responsive to the needs of people of color and immigrants.

    Health equity is an organizational priority for Community Catalyst, and, consequently, reflected in our advocacy work. However, we need to build a network of community-based groups, state and national advocacy organizations, foundations, and individuals to stand and work together to address health disparities effectively. Please get involved and invested in reducing health disparities by demanding that lawmakers fully implement the ACA, the Action Plan to Reduce Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities and the National Stakeholder Strategy for Achieving Health Equity.

    This post originally appeared at The Community Catalyst Blog. Views and opinions expressed are those of the author and Community Catalyst.


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    To wrap up National Minority Health Month, NCLR is proudly hosting a blog carnival with our friends and partners to celebrate recent progress toward eliminating health disparities for underserved communities—and talk frankly about the challenges that remain. Today, bloggers answer the question: What is your organization or community doing to advance a health equity mission?

    Farmworker Justice: Advancing Health Equity through Education and Advocacy

    By Alexis Guild, Migrant Health Policy Analyst, Farmworker Justice

    Farmworker Justice (FJ), a national farmworker advocacy organization based in Washington, DC, strongly believes in the empowerment of our nation’s farmworkers. Farmworkers work and live under extremely hazardous conditions. They are disproportionately affected by pesticide exposure, poor housing conditions, strenuous and dangerous working conditions, and physical and mental stress. Yet according to the 2009 National Agricultural Worker’s Survey, 41% of farmworkers had not visited a U.S. healthcare provider in two years. Farmworkers face unique barriers to healthcare access. They are poor; they often live in rural areas with little public transportation; many are immigrants and don’t speak English well; they have different cultural beliefs; they risk retaliation and exploitation by employers; and often are fearful due to discrimination and xenophobia.

    Farmworker Justice’s health programs aim to positively impact the well-being of farmworkers through education and capacity-building. We work with farmworker organizations, farmworker advocates, civil rights organizations, legal services providers and migrant health centers to promote access to healthcare. Through our partners, we are able to connect farmworkers to health information. We train promotores de salud (community health workers) on HIV/AIDS prevention, workplace safety and children’s health. We also provide training to migrant healthcare providers and farmworker advocates on policies and issues that affect farmworker communities, such as immigration law, so they may enhance their outreach and provide more culturally competent care.

    At FJ, we hope to advance health equity through education, law and policy. Our nation’s farmworkers, who harvest the fruits and vegetables we eat, have earned their right to quality healthcare that is affordable, accessible and culturally competent. FJ and our partners are committed to working towards improved health access for all farmworkers.

    For more information on Farmworker Justice’s health programs, please visit www.farmworkerjustice.org

    This post originally appeared at Harvesting Justice.  Views and opinions expressed are those of the author and Farmworker Justice.


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