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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Julian Teixeira
    (202) 776-1812
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    Washington—NCLR hailed the Obama administration’s announcement earlier today that it would stop deporting and provide administrative relief to DREAMers, the group of undocumented young people who, brought here at a young age, know no other country but the U.S. 

    “The only country these kids have ever known has come through for them today. This ground-breaking action ends the fear that has dominated every single day of their lives—the threat of deportation from their home through no fault of their own,” stated Janet Murguía, NCLR President and CEO.

    “This is great news not only for the people and organizations that have worked tirelessly on behalf of DREAMers, but also to all those who believe that government can and should act in a sensible, humane, and responsible manner when it comes to immigration,” noted Murguía. “It makes sense for our country’s immigration enforcement to focus on criminals and others who pose the greatest threat to our society. It makes no sense to concentrate scarce resources on going after valedictorians and people serving in our military. That is the essence of today’s decision.”

    “This decision is a temporary, commonsense solution to a profound dilemma—how to make sure we don’t lose some of the best and brightest in our country while they wait for Congress to act. We would caution, though, that this is indeed a temporary fix. Only Congress can give these young people the permanent help they, and as importantly our country, deserve,” continued Murguía.

    “Today, we celebrate. Tomorrow, NCLR’s job is both to ensure that our community gets accurate information about this policy and what it means, and to continue urging Congress to fulfill its long-overdue responsibility to fix our broken immigration system,” concluded Murguía.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    PARA DIVULGACIÓN INMEDIATA

    Para más información:
    Julián Teixeira
    (202) 776-1812
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    Washington—NCLR hoy elogió a la Administración Obama por su anuncio que detendrá las deportaciones y concederá alivio administrativo a los DREAMers, un grupo de jóvenes indocumentados quienes, al ser traídos desde muy temprana edad a este país, no conocen otro país fuera de los E.E.U.U.

    “El único país que conocen estos jóvenes ha cumplido con ellos el día de hoy. Esta acción sin precedente pone fin al miedo que ha dominado cada día de sus vidas—la amenaza de ser deportados de sus casas sin haber ellos tenido culpa de nada,” dijo Janet Murguía, Presidenta del NCLR.

    “Esta es una noticia muy buena, no sólo para las personas y organizaciones que han trabajado incansablemente por parte de los DREAMers, sino también para todos aquellos que creen que el gobierno debe de actuar de una manera sensata, humana y responsable cuando viene al tema de la inmigración,” dijo Janet Murguía, Presidenta del NCLR. “Tiene todo el sentido del mundo que nuestro país enfoque su mayor esfuerzo en aplicar las leyes migratorias hacia los criminales y otras personas que ponen en amenaza nuestra sociedad. No tiene ningún sentido dedicar escasos recursos a la persecución de personas que están sirviendo en nuestras fuerzas armadas o son alumnos ejemplares. Esta es la esencia de la decisión de hoy.”

    “Esta acción es una solución temporal y de buen sentido común para un dilema sumamente profundo—cómo asegurar que no perdemos algunos de nuestros jóvenes más talentosos y exitosos si esperamos a que actúe el Congreso. Recomendamos, sin embargo, prudencia porque esto es en efecto una solución temporaria. Sólo el Congreso puede dar a estos jóvenes la solución permanente que ellos necesitan y que nuestro país merece,” continuó Murguía.

    “Hoy celebramos. Mañana, será la tarea del NCLR asegurarse de que nuestra comunidad obtenga la información precisa sobre esta política y sobre lo que significa, y, también, la de continuar instando al Congreso a que lleve a cabo su responsabilidad de arreglar nuestro sistema inmigratorio roto,” concluyó Murguía.

    El NCLR (EL Consejo Nacional de La Raza) es la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos y trabaja para mejorar sus oportunidades. Para más información sobre el NCLR, por favor visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

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  • 06/16/12--17:26: First Victory for DREAMers!
  • Today, NCLR joined fellow organizations in DC and thousands of Latinos in the U.S. and the world to celebrate Obama’s halt to the deportation of DREAMers. It was a groundbreaking and bold decision that marks this administration’s willingness to move forward on comprehensive immigration reform.


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    By Camila Gallardo, Senior Communications Manager, NCLR

    Today is Father’s Day, a day we commemorate with the yearly ritual of buying cologne or ties (in the case of Latinos, the ties can often be swapped out for a nice Guayabera), a steak dinner or tickets to a ball game for the man who helped raise us and shape us into the people we are today. I can’t help but think that sometimes we get caught up in the tradition and don’t take enough time to reflect on what it truly means to have that man in our lives. This is a man whose hard work and sacrifice helped to create that feeling of security and constancy that we’d always have a roof over our heads and food on the table, even though times may have-- in all reality--been tough.

    When I was growing up, my father--a Cuban exile who came to this country at 17 with not a penny to his name--was always present, but often absent, if that makes sense. Why? Because he worked two jobs during the week and one on the weekend; often, I would catch only glimpses of him in the early morning when he kissed us good-bye and the smell of his cologne would jar me awake (yes, Latino men often wear cologne even to their blue collar jobs). It was great to see him on the weekends when he was able to spend some more time at home and relax. I look back at those times wishing he didn’t have to work so hard; I know there wasn’t a job in the world my father wouldn’t have taken just to make sure we didn’t go without. When I think about my childhood, I’m often wistful and wish he’d had more time at home, but I’m also enormously proud of his sacrifice and his work ethic. As a parent myself now, I am more fully aware of that driving desire to give your kids more, and better than you had.

    Latino men like my Dad have been an important segment of the workforce in the last several decades, but today, they are indispensible. While the non-Hispanic labor force has decreased, there has been tremendous growth in the number of Latino workers; in fact, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Hispanics will account for three-quarters of the growth in the nation’s labor force from 2010 to 2020. What’s also interesting, particularly at a time when minority communities are disproportionately affected by the unemployment crisis, Latino men are much more likely than any other group to be employed or searching for a job; the labor force participation rate for Hispanic men in 2011 (the latest available) was 76.5% compared to 71.3% for White men and 64.2% for Black men.

    Today, my dad is retired and other Hispanic men have taken his place in the labor force, including my hardworking husband. Finally, my father is able to enjoy a bit more of the fruits of his labor, and to my delight, is a constant and reassuring presence in the lives of his grandchildren. So today, on Father’s Day, let’s take a minute to say thank you for the hard work and sacrifice of all the Latino men in our lives who went without so we wouldn’t. I certainly will.

     


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                               Contact:
    June 18, 2012                                                                     Camila Gallardo
                                                                                                 (305) 215-4259
                                                                                                 cgallardo@nclr.org
                                                                                                 Kathy Mimberg
                                                                                                 (202) 316-2612
                                                                                                 kmimberg@nclr.org


    Washington, D.C.—Any day now, the U.S. Supreme Court will issue its decision on whether to uphold or strike down the Affordable Care Act (ACA), in whole or in part. Hanging in the balance are millions of Latinos who make up one of the most underinsured populations in the U.S. and are in great need of access to affordable health care. For insight on how the Supreme Court’s ACA decision will impact our nation’s largest minority community, the following NCLR (National Council of La Raza) health policy experts are available for press interviews:

    • Jennifer Ng’andu, Deputy Director, Health Policy Project, oversees efforts to improve the health status and outcomes of Latinos through national policy change. Her work focuses on eliminating injustices in health care by increasing health coverage in the Latino community and improving access to quality care and services. In 2009, she worked on collective efforts to enact a major children’s health initiative, which resulted in more than 250,000 uninsured children receiving access to insurance and Congress restoring at least $1 billion of public health insurance to legal immigrant children and expectant mothers.
    • Kara D. Ryan, Senior Research Analyst, helps tell the story of Latinos’ health and nutrition experiences in the U.S. Her areas of expertise include: access to health care for mixed-immigration-status families; Hispanics’ access to Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP); health data on Latino and other medically underserved communities; and Latino child nutrition (including hunger and obesity). Kara frequently serves as an expert panelist in national venues and serves as the NCLR liaison for the U.S. Census Bureau’s Census Information Center program.

    For further information or to schedule an interview, contact Julian Teixeira, Director of Communications, at jteixeira@nclr.org. An infographic describing how the Supreme Court’s decision will impact Latinos is also available from NCLR. Please feel free to reproduce this graphic.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    by Alicia Criado, Policy Associate, Economic and Employment Policy Project, NCLR

    During my trip to Johannesburg for the African Presidential Roundtable 2012, convened by Boston University’s African Presidential Archives and Research Center (APARC), I came across the following African Proverb: “Tomorrow belongs to the people who prepare for it today.” This proverb illustrates much of the problem limiting Africa’s ability to build a secure and sustainable 21st century energy agenda—they are not developing adequate levels of human capital with the necessary skills. Given my focus on economic and employment policy issues affecting Latino workers in the U.S., I was very familiar with this problem. Similar to Africa, there is a need to create pipelines and job training programs in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) fields in order to ensure that the next generation of leadership is able to benefit from current opportunities in energy and continue to create new innovative technologies. Without a trained workforce, nations risk undermining their ability to achieve energy security and sustainability in either the short or long run.

    The development of new energy innovations must happen in conjunction with investments in training and education for people with STEM backgrounds to fill 21st century energy jobs. Boston University Associate Professor Dr. Muhammad Zaman’s 50-year energy personnel projection estimate for various Sub-Saharan African countries indicates that most countries will have a scarcity of people with any form of diploma or degree. As the chart below shows, most countries currently largely lack people with any form of training or education needed for the technical and research and development positions in the energy industry. However, what the chart does not account for is the large number of Africans trained in the STEM fields, particularly engineers and researchers, living abroad. This “brain drain” is hampering development on the continent. During my time in graduate school, I recall meeting many African students that obtained their degrees and had no plans of returning to their home countries—there simply was little incentive to do so. Instead of hoping skilled Africans will decide on their own to return to their home countries, governments must develop relationships with institutions to explore ways of encouraging skilled African students to work in Africa and assist in the development of their countries.

    As I shift gears and return to my work engaging Latinos around clean energy at the National Council of La Raza, I am hopeful that the new ideas, perspectives, and contacts I gained in South Africa will serve as both invaluable resources and motivation. Like many Africans, many Hispanics living in the U.S. stand to benefit from pathways which will increase their ability to compete for new job opportunities in a quickly unfolding clean energy economy. The skill and talent are out there, so let’s start investing in them!


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
     Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    Washington, D.C.—In the midst of the devastating housing crisis affecting millions of Latinos across the country, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) is launching a phone counseling service aimed at helping homeowners facing foreclosure. Residents of Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Nevada, Michigan, and Washington state are invited to call the new hotline to speak with HUD-certified housing counselors who will help them navigate through their options of applying for a loan modification, short sale, refinance, or submitting a claim of wrongful foreclosure.

    “There are about two million families in the process of losing their homes at this very minute, and drastic funding cuts have completely gutted foreclosure prevention programs at a time when we need them the most,” said Victor Burrola, Director of the NCLR Homeownership Network (NHN). “We’re hopeful that this hotline will provide the relief and expertise that countless homeowners need to navigate the confusing options before them and possibly save their homes.”

    Borrowers who call the new hotline will first be offered a one-on-one counseling session with a local NHN counselor or other HUD-approved housing counseling agency. If they do not live near one, then a housing counselor will provide in-depth foreclosure prevention counseling over the phone. This service will include everything from providing an initial counseling and analysis of a homeowner’s situation and options to working with them throughout the loan modification process.

    “Understanding the nuances of the foreclosure process is difficult for most people and is only made worse by loan modification scammers who particularly target Latinos and other communities of color, charging them thousands of dollars without providing assistance,” added Burrola. “We are now offering an easy, credible place to turn to so that no homeowner feels that they are out of options.”

    Homeowners can contact the housing counseling hotline by calling (888) 532-3021.

    The NCLR Homeownership Network (NHN)—a network of 50 community-based counseling providers—has provided first-time homebuyers with the advice and guidance they need to navigate the mortgage process for more than a decade. NCLR serves 65,000 families annually through this network.

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    PARA DIVULGACIÓN INMEDIATA

    Contacto:
    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    Washington, D.C.—En medio de la devastadora crisis de vivienda que afecta a millones de latinos en todo el país, el NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) lanza un servicio telefónico de asesoría para ayudar a los propietarios de vivienda que enfrentan una ejecución hipotecaria. Los residentes de los estados de Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Nevada, Michigan y Washington están invitados a llamar a la nueva línea de ayuda para hablar con asesores de vivienda certificados por HUD, que les ayudarán a conocer sus opciones para solicitar la modificación de su préstamo, una venta corta, un refinanciamiento, o poner una reclamación sobre una ejecución hipotecaria injusta.

    “Hay aproximadamente dos millones de familias en el proceso de perder sus casas en este mismo minuto, y los recortes drásticos han saqueado completamente los programas de prevención de ejecuciones hipotecarias en el momento en que más los necesitamos”, dijo Victor Burrola, director de la Red de Propiedad de Vivienda (NHN por sus siglas en inglés) del NCLR. “Tenemos esperanzas de que esta línea de ayuda proporcione el alivio y la pericia que un sin número de propietarios necesita para entender las confusas opciones que se le presentan y posiblemente salvar sus casas”.

    A los prestatarios que llamen a la nueva línea de ayuda, primero se les ofrecerá una sesión de asesoría individual con un asesor local de la Red u otra agencia de asesoramiento aprobada por HUD. Si no viven cerca de alguna, entonces un asesor en vivienda le proveerá asesoramiento completo por teléfono sobre cómo prevenir la ejecución hipotecaria. Este servicio incluirá todo, desde el asesoramiento inicial y el análisis de la situación y las opciones del propietario hasta trabajar con él en el proceso de la modificación de préstamo.

    “Entender los matices del proceso de ejecución hipotecaria es difícil para la mayoría de la gente y lo empeoran los estafadores de modificación de préstamos que van tras los latinos y otras comunidades de color, cobrándoles miles de dólares sin siquiera proveerles ayuda”, agregó Burrola. “Estamos ofreciendo un lugar creíble y sencillo a donde recurrir para que ningún propietario de vivienda sienta que no tiene opciones”.

    Los propietarios de vivienda pueden ponerse en contacto con los asesores de vivienda de la línea de ayuda, llamando al (888) 532-3021.

    La Red de Propiedad de Vivienda del NCLR –una red de 50 proveedores de asesoría comunitarios– ha proporcionado, por más de una década, el consejo y la guía que los propietarios de su primera casa necesitan en los pasos del proceso hipotecario. El NCLR da servicio a 65,000 familias anualmente a través de esta red.

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    PARA DIVULGACIÓN INMEDIATA                                        PARA MÁS INFORMACIÓN:
    20 de junio, 2012                                                                      Julián Teixeira
                                                                                                       (202) 776-1812
                                                                                                       jteixeira@nclr.org

     

    Washington, D.C.—Ocho nuevos miembros se han unido recientemente a la Red de Afiliados del NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) de organizaciones locales que trabajan con la comunidad latina en todo el país: Center for Employment Training de San Jose, California.; Hispanic Health Initiatives de Casselberry, Florida.; Humboldt Park Social Services de Chicago, Illinois.; Latino Network de Portland, Oregon.; Parents Step Ahead de Dallas, Texas; Puentes New Orleans de New Orleans, Louisiana.; Turner House Children’s Clinic de Kansas City, Kansas.; y VOZ Workers’ Rights Education Project de Portland, Oregon. Ahora, el NCLR cuenta con 279 organizaciones como miembros afiliados en todo Estados Unidos, incluyendo su primer miembro en Louisiana.

    “Estamos muy entusiasmados y le damos la bienvenida a la Red de Afiliados del NCLR a estos nuevos miembros”, dijo Sonia Pérez, vicepresidenta sénior de iniciativas estratégicas del NCLR. Las organizaciones afiliadas del NCLR son socios vitales que nos ayudan a ampliar las oportunidades de las familias latinas y a fortalecer sus comunidades y nuestro país”.

    Se puede encontrar información sobre las nuevas organizaciones afiliadas del NCLR en:
    • Center for Employment Training, San Jose, California. (www.cetweb.org)
    • Hispanic Health Initiatives, Casselberry, Florida. (http://hhi2001.org)
    • Humboldt Park Social Services, Chicago, Illinois. (http://www.hpsschanginglives.org/)
    • Latino Network, Portland, Oregon. (http://www.latnet.org)
    • Parents Step Ahead, Dallas, Texas (http://www.parentsstepahead.org/)
    • Puentes New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana. (http://www.puentesno.org/)
    • Turner House Children’s Clinic, Inc., Kansas, City, Kansas. (http://www.thcckc.org)
    • VOZ Workers’ Rights Education Project, Portland, Oregon. (http://www.portlandvoz.org)

    Los afiliados del NCLR incluyen a 279 organizaciones comunitarias que proveen programas y servicios a millones de hispanos estadounidenses. A través de su trabajo, educan niños y adultos, ayudan a los trabajadores a prepararse para el empleo, enseñan inglés a los inmigrantes, registran gente para votar, ayudan a las familias a comprar y conservar sus casas, y proporcionan servicios de salud. También contribuyen a la economía de sus ciudades y estados al proveer considerable apoyo a sus comunidades y empleando a más de 24,000 personas.

    El NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) es la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos y trabaja para mejorar sus oportunidades. Para más información sobre el NCLR, por favor visite http://www.nclr.org/o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                              Contact:
    June 20, 2012                                                                     Julian Teixeira
                                                                                                   (202) 776-1812
                                                                                                   jteixeira@nclr.org

     

    Washington, D.C.—Eight new Affiliate members have recently joined the NCLR (National Council of La Raza) Affiliate Network of local organizations that work with the Latino community throughout the nation: Center for Employment Training in San Jose, Calif.; Hispanic Health Initiatives in Casselberry, Fla.; Humboldt Park Social Services in Chicago, Ill.; Latino Network in Portland, Ore.; Parents Step Ahead in Dallas, Texas; Puentes New Orleans in New Orleans, La.; Turner House Children’s Clinic in Kansas City, Kan.; and VOZ Workers’ Rights Education Project in Portland, Ore. With these additions, NCLR now counts 279 organizations across the United States as Affiliate members, including its first Affiliate in Louisiana.

    “We are excited to welcome these new members to the NCLR Affiliate Network,” said Sonia Pérez, NCLR Senior Vice President, Strategic Initiatives. “NCLR Affiliates are vital partners in expanding opportunities for Latino families and strengthening their communities and our nation.”

    Information about the organizations that are new NCLR Affiliates can be found as follows:
    • Center for Employment Training, San Jose, Calif. (www.cetweb.org)
    • Hispanic Health Initiatives, Casselberry, Fla. (http://hhi2001.org)
    • Humboldt Park Social Services, Chicago, Ill. (http://www.hpsschanginglives.org/)
    • Latino Network, Portland, Ore. (http://www.latnet.org)
    • Parents Step Ahead, Dallas, Texas (http://www.parentsstepahead.org/)
    • Puentes New Orleans, New Orleans, La. (http://www.puentesno.org/)
    • Turner House Children’s Clinic, Inc., Kansas, City, Kan. (http://www.thcckc.org)
    • VOZ Workers’ Rights Education Project, Portland, Ore. (http://www.portlandvoz.org)

    NCLR’s Affiliates include 279 community organizations that provide programs and services to millions of Hispanic Americans. Through their work, they educate children and adults, help workers prepare for jobs, teach immigrants English, register people to vote, help families buy and keep their homes, and provide health services. NCLR’s Affiliates also contribute to the economies of their cities and states by providing significant support to their communities and employing more than 24,000 taxpayers.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org, or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.
     


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Julian Teixeira
    (202) 776-1812
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    NCLR also welcomes new executive officers and Board members

    Washington—NCLR (National Council of La Raza) is pleased to announce that Jorge A. Plasencia, chairman, CEO, and cofounder of Miami-based advertising, digital, and communications company República, has been elected Chair of the NCLR Board of Directors. Plasencia is the first Cuban American and first Floridian to serve as Chair of the NCLR board.

    “With the historic election of this dynamic and committed entrepreneur and community leader, the NCLR Board has turned to a new and diverse generation of Hispanic leadership to help steer our organization into the future,” stated Janet Murguía, NCLR President and CEO. “During his tenure on the Board, Jorge has already helped NCLR immensely in strengthening our ties with the Cuban American community in Florida and nationwide. With his considerable expertise and rich experience in media, marketing, and communications, he has been a tremendous asset in helping to refine and promote the NCLR brand. We look forward to having someone of his background and caliber at the helm of our Board.”

    Plasencia joined NCLR’s Board in 2006 and previously served as vice chair. Prior to founding República, he was the corporate vice president and operating manager of Univision Radio. He also worked for Estefan Enterprises, the entertainment and hospitality conglomerate founded by Gloria Estefan and her husband, Emilio Estefan. As vice president there, he was responsible for all marketing, publicity, and corporate strategy, which also included the management of global artists such as Shakira.

    “I am beyond humbled to have been elected Chair by the NCLR Board,” said Jorge A. Plasencia. “We are living at a historic moment in the history of the U.S. Hispanic community, and I am looking forward to working with Janet, our Board, the staff, Affiliates, and partners as we continue to build bridges that improve opportunities for the more than 50 million Latinos that call our great country home,” added Plasencia.

    Plasencia is also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the Young Presidents’ Organization. He is a founding board member and serves on the advisory council of the Congressional Hispanic Leadership Institute, is chair of the Cuban American National Council, and serves on the board of the Association of Hispanic Advertising Agencies and the Miami Dade College Foundation, among others. In 1991, he cofounded Amigos For Kids, a Miami-based nonprofit organization for underprivileged children and families and an NCLR Affiliate, and his work there earned him the March of Dimes “Humanitarian of the Year” award. Just last week, he was named the 2012 Ernst & Young Entrepreneur Of The Year® in the Florida Emerging Business category.

    In addition to Plasencia, the members of the Board of Directors’ Executive Committee are:

    • Renata Soto, Vice Chair, Nashville, Tenn.
    • Dr. Juan J. Sánchez, Secretary, Austin, Texas
    • Beatriz Olvera-Stotzer, Treasurer, Los Angeles, Calif.
    • Daniel R. Ortega, Jr., Immediate Past Chair, Phoenix, Ariz.
    • Janet Murguía, President and CEO, District of Columbia

    Members at Large

    • Fred Fernandez, Johns Creek, Ga.
    • James Padilla, Sarasota, Fla.
    • Nilda Ruiz, Philadelphia, Pa.
    • Cid Wilson, Leonia, N.J.

    The NCLR Board also welcomed several new members including Giselle Fernandez, President, Skinny Hippo Productions, Los Angeles, Calif.; M. Lorena González, Attorney at Law, Schroeter Goldmark & Bender, Seattle, Wash.; Maria S. Salinas, President and Founder, Salinas Consulting LLC, Los Angeles, Calif.; Gary B. Stone, CEO, Strategic Thinking One on One, Houston, Texas; and Dr. Christine Swanson Cannon, Arsht-Cannon Fund, Newark, Del.

    NCLR’s Board is a 24-member body composed of elected officials and representatives of community-based organizations, the corporate sector, and academia. Board members reflect the diversity of Hispanic nationality groups and the geographic distribution of the Hispanic population. By mandate, the Board must include equal representation of men and women.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Latinos. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org, or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

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    PARA DIVULGACIÓN INMEDIATA                        PARA MÁS INFORMACIÓN:
    June 21, 2012                                                            Camila Gallardo
                                                                                           (305) 215-4259
                                                                                           cgallardo@nclr.org

    MIAMI— Hoy, en un foro público en Miami, expertos y oficiales de vivienda compartieron con la comunidad local en un diálogo orientado a promover soluciones a la crisis de vivienda e instar a los candidatos presidenciales a que se comprometan con dirigirse a los problemas del mercado de vivienda que ha obstaculizado la revitalización comunitaria y ha causado a que muchas personas sean víctimas de la ejecución hipotecaria. El sur de la Florida ha sido impactado de forma desproporcionada; en mayo, las ejecuciones hipotecarias incrementaron un 11 porciento, y la Florida está entre los estados con el mayor crecimiento (el 83%) de ejecuciones hipotecarias en proceso.

    Para millones de americanos, incluyendo a familias trabajadoras y personas de mayor edad, la crisis hipotecaria está muy lejos de ver su fin. Para cesar las ejecuciones de hipotecas innecesarias, que son bastante comunes en el país, el NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza por sus siglas en inglés) y otras organizaciones de los derechos civiles se han unido para lanzar la campaña Home for Good en este año de elecciones presidenciales. Los otros grupos participantes son el Center for American Progress, Center for Responsible Lending, Empowering and Strengthening Ohio’s People, Greenlining, Homes on the Hill, Kirwan Institute, National CAPACD, National Fair Housing Alliance, National Urban League, Nuestra Voz, Líderes Del Valle De Sonoma Inc., and The Opportunity Agenda.

    “Este país carece de una solución a la crisis de vivienda si pretendemos que siga viva la oportunidad de ser dueño de vivienda para la próxima generación,” dijo Janis Bowdler, Directora del Programa de Refuerzo de Bienes del NCLR. “Los votantes están poniendo mucha atención a los propuestas que están desarollando los candidatos presidenciales para asegurar que son soluciones concretas. Los dueños de viviendo no tienen el lujo de seguir escuchando simple retórica mientras que sus casas peligran.”

    La campaña Home for Good y sus afiliados le han pedido a los candidatos que compartan sus planes para:
    • Poner en fin las ejecuciones hipotecarias innecesarias
    • Expandir el alquile asequible de vivienda
    • Restaurar un camino a la posibilidad de ser dueño de vivienda
    Participantes en el foro público también discutieron un sin número de desarrollos importantes que tomaron efecto en el último año, incluyendo el acuerdo histórico de $25 mil de millones entre los Fiscales Generales y cinco de los más grandes prestatarios.

    “La decisión que tomarán los votantes en las elecciones del 2012 tendrá un impacto enorme sobre el desarrollo de la política de vivienda en los próximos años,” añadió Bowdler. “Necesitamos asegurarnos que nuestros oficiales electos están de parte de los inquilinos y dueños que están luchando con estos temas.”

    Este verano, se patrocinarán foros públicos en Columbus, Ohio, y Washington, DC. Para más información sobre la campaña Home for Good, por favor visite la página web: www.myhomeforgood.com.

    El NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) es la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos y trabaja para mejorar sus oportunidades. Para más información sobre el NCLR, por favor visite http://www.nclr.org/o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                          Contact:
    June 21, 2012                                                                   Camila Gallardo
                                                                                              (305) 215-4259
                                                                                               cgallardo@nclr.org

    MIAMI—For millions of Americans, including communities of color, working families, and seniors, the housing crisis is far from over. To stave off unnecessary foreclosures that continue to be all too common across the country, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) and other leading civil rights and advocacy organizations have come together to launch the Home for Good campaign town hall tour in this crucial election year. The partnering groups are Center for American Progress, Center for Responsible Lending, Empowering and Strengthening Ohio’s People, Greenlining, Homes on the Hill, Kirwan Institute, National CAPACD, National Fair Housing Alliance, National Urban League, Nuestra Voz, Líderes Del Valle De Sonoma Inc., and The Opportunity Agenda.

    “This country is in desperate need of a resolution to the housing crisis if we hope to keep the dream of homeownership alive for the next generation,” said Janis Bowdler, Director of the Wealth-Building Policy Project at NCLR. “Voters are paying incredibly close attention to proposals that our presidential candidates put forward to make sure that they are offering concrete solutions. Homeowners cannot afford lip service from the leaders of this country while they are still losing their homes at astonishing rates.”

    Today, at a town hall in Miami, leading experts and housing officials engaged the local community in a solutions-oriented dialogue and challenged the presidential candidates to commit to addressing problems in the housing market that have stymied neighborhood revitalization and led to Americans losing their homes to foreclosure. South Florida has been disproportionately affected by the housing crisis; in May, foreclosures spiked 11 percent, and Florida is among the states with the largest increase (83 percent since last year) in scheduled foreclosures.
     

    The Home for Good campaign partners challenged the presidential candidates to share their plans to:
    • Stop needless foreclosures
    • Expand affordable rental housing
    • Revive a sustainable path to homeownership

    Participants in the town halls also discussed a number of important developments for homeowners that have occurred over the past year, including the historic $25 billion multistate settlement between the Attorneys General and five of the largest loan servicers.

    “The decision that voters make in the 2012 election is going to have a tremendous impact on housing policy in the coming years,” added Bowdler. “We need to make sure that our elected officials are standing behind struggling homeowners and renters.”

    Upcoming town halls this summer are scheduled for Columbus, Ohio and the District of Columbia. For more information and updates about the Home for Good campaign, please visit www.myhomeforgood.com.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Latinos. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org, or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Joseph Rendeiro
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    (202) 776-1566

    Denver—Every day, Colorado is working to reduce its use of limited energy sources such as coal and oil, while developing and using more renewable energy, like solar power. Join NCLR (National Council of La Raza) and the Honorable Federico Peña, former Mayor of Denver, for a town hall meeting to discuss the opportunities and challenges for Latinos in Colorado’s growing clean energy economy.

    If you plan to attend the event, RSVP to Joseph Rendeiro via email at jrendeiro@nclr.org or call (202) 776-1566.

    MEDIA ADVISORY

    WHO:
    Hon. Federico Peña, Senior Advisor, Vestar Capital Partners; former Mayor of Denver; former U.S. Energy Secretary; former U.S. Transportation Secretary
    Ana Cabrera, Anchor, ABC News Channel 7 Denver
    Joy Hughes, President, Solar Gardens Institute 
    Alicia Criado, Policy Associate, NCLR

    WHAT: Town Hall on Latinos and Colorado’s Clean Energy Economy

    WHEN: Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 11:30 a.m.

    WHERE:
    Mi Casa Resource Center
    360 Acoma Street
    Denver, CO 80223

    TO COVER: Please contact Joseph Rendeiro at jrendeiro@nclr.org, or call (202) 776-1566.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    It seems the whole country is on pins and needles awaiting the Supreme Court’s decision on the Affordable Care Act, but you might be asking yourself, “What happens after the Justices finally render their decision? What’s next?”

    We’re wondering the same thing. And, we want you to join the conversation we’re having about what we do after the Supreme Court issues its decision. Our chat will focus specifically on what the decision means for women, people of color, LGBT folks, and other underserved groups.

    This Tweet Chat is your chance to understand what the Supreme Court’s decision on the health care law means for you, your family, and your community. Advocates, organizers, and consumers will have an opportunity to learn more about the implications of this decision, and be able to ask questions, get advice for organizing in your community, and share resources from a wide range of participating organizations.

    There will be some pretty hefty groups joining the chat, too. Just take a look at who we have lined up:

    Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum * Black Women’s Health Imperative * Center for American Progress * Families USA * League of United Latin American Citizens * Mocha Moms * MomsRising * National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum * National Center for Lesbian Rights * National Council of La Raza * National Gay and Lesbian Task Force * National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health * National Women’s Law Center * Raising Women’s Voices for the Health Care We Need * Service Employees International Union

    Here are the details you need to join:

    When: The day AFTER the Supreme Court rules on the health care law, at 2:00–3:30 p.m. EDT/11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m. PDT

    How: Join the chat live by following #HealthJustice on Twitter. You can also follow #HCRdecision to get updates all week long.

    See you online! 


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    Both President Obama and Mitt Romney spoke to thousands of Latino elected officials this week. Here are their speeches in full.

    President Obama:


    GOP Presumptive Republican Party Candidate for President Mitt Romney:


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    Both President Obama and Mitt Romney spoke to thousands of Latino elected officials this week. Here are their speeches in full.

    President Obama:


    GOP Presumptive Republican Party Candidate for President Mitt Romney:


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Julian Teixeira
    (202) 776-1812
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    Ruling leaves door open to racial profiling and community intimidation in Arizona

    Washington—Today, the United States Supreme Court issued a mixed ruling in Arizona v. United States, striking down most of the provisions of Arizona’s SB 1070, an anti-immigrant law passed in 2010. The Court struck down Section 3, criminalizing failure to carry alien registration documents; Section 5(C), criminalizing the seeking of work without authorization; and Section 6, which allows warrantless arrests when an officer has “probable cause” to believe that a person has committed a crime that makes that person removable from the United States. However, the Court upheld Section 2(B), the racial profiling provision known as “show me your papers,” requiring state and local police to attempt to determine the immigration status of any person lawfully stopped, detained, or arrested if there is a “reasonable suspicion” that the person is unlawfully present.

    “We welcome the Supreme Court’s decision to strike down most of the elements of this offensive law and reaffirm that the federal government has primary responsibility on immigration,” said Janet Murguía, President and CEO of NCLR (National Council of La Raza), the largest national Latino civil rights and advocacy organization in the U.S. “We remain deeply troubled, though, that the Supreme Court allowed the heart of the problem in SB 1070—legitimizing racial profiling—to stand, and failed to decisively remove the bull’s eye from the backs of Arizona’s Latinos, leaving it to future lawsuits to address. We fear this part of the decision will open the floodgates to the harassment, abuse, and intimidation of our community in what is already the most hostile place for Hispanics in the country.”

    Every sector of mainstream America was represented among those filing briefs in opposition to Arizona’s SB 1070. Over 300 organizations joined briefs supporting the legal challenge against this law, including 68 members of Congress; 44 former state attorneys general; dozens of cities and towns; labor, business, and civil rights leaders; law enforcement experts; former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright; former commissioners of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service; prominent religious institutions; and numerous faith, labor, and immigrants’ rights organizations.

    “The passage of SB 1070 in Arizona and its copycats in Alabama, Georgia, and elsewhere has outraged and electrified the Latino community, and today’s ruling will spur even greater action,” said Murguía. “We will continue the fight in the legislatures, in the courts, and in the voting booth. Thirty-one states have declined to follow SB 1070’s path because these types of laws are costly, ineffective, and discriminatory, and the evidence on that remains unchanged. The Supreme Court ruling does not give states a green light to advance copycat measures. Ultimately Congress bears responsibility to pass legislation which will fix our nation’s broken immigration system, and we must compel them to act to deliver the real solutions our country needs.”

    “NCLR will work with its network of nearly 300 affiliated community-based organizations to provide information about the decision, educate the community about defending their civil rights, and intensify voter engagement,” concluded Murguía.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    PARA DIVULGACIÓN INMEDIATA

    Contacto:
    Julián Teixeira
    (202) 776-1812
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    La resolución deja la puerta abierta a la discriminación racial y la intimidación de la comunidad en Arizona

    Washington—Hoy, la Corte Suprema de Estados Unidos emitió una decisión ambivalente en el caso Arizona vs. Estados Unidos derogando la mayoría de las disposiciones relacionadas con la ley SB 1070 de Arizona, una ley antiinmigrante aprobada en el 2010. La corte derogó: la Sección 3 - penalización por no portar los documentos de registro; Sección 5(C) – penalización por buscar trabajo sin autorización; y Sección 6 - que permite el arresto sin orden judicial cuando un oficial cree que hay una “causa probable” de que la persona haya cometido algún delito que conlleve la expulsión del país; pero mantuvo la Sección 2(B), la disposición de perfil racial conocida como “muéstrame tus papeles”, y que exige a la policía local y estatal que determine el estatus migratorio de cualquier persona legalmente detenida o arrestada si existe una "sospecha razonable" de que la persona se encuentre en el país ilegalmente.

    “Acogemos la decisión de la Corte Suprema de derogar la mayoría de los elementos de esta ofensiva ley y que reafirma que la responsabilidad primordial sobre el desarrollo de las leyes migratorias cae bajo la responsabilidad del gobierno federal”, dijo Janet Murguía, presidenta y directora general del Consejo Nacional de La Raza (NCLR por sus siglas en inglés), la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos. “No obstante, seguimos consternados de que permitiera que el corazón del problema de la ley SB 1070 siga en vigor—la legitimización del perfil racial-- y que no haya eliminado contundentemente la diana de las espaldas de los latinos de Arizona. Tememos que esta parte de la decisión abrirá la puerta al hostigamiento, abuso, intimidación de nuestra comunidad en el estado que ya es considerado el más hostil para los hispanos en el pais.”

    Todos los sectores del pueblo estadounidense estuvieron representados en los escritos presentados en oposición a la SB 1070 de Arizona. Más de 300 organizaciones apoyaron con escritos el cuestionamiento legal a esta ley, incluyendo a 68 miembros del Congreso; 44 ex procuradores generales del estado; docenas de ciudades y pueblos; líderes de derechos civiles, del trabajo y corporaciones; expertos de aplicación de la ley; la ex secretaria del estado, Madeleine Albright; excomisionados del Departamento de Servicios de Ciudadanía e Inmigración de EE.UU.; importantes instituciones religiosas; y numerosas organizaciones laborales, religiosas y de derechos de los inmigrantes.

    “La aprobación de la ley SB 1070 de Arizona y sus duplicas de Alabama, Georgia, y otros lugares han indignado y electrizado a la comunidad latina, y la resolución de hoy emprenderá acciones más intensificadas”, dijo Murguía. “Continuaremos con la lucha en las legislaturas, en las cortes, y en las urnas de votación. Treinta y un estados se han negado a seguir el camino de la ley SB 1070 porque este tipo de leyes son costosas, ineficaces y discriminatorias, y esa evidencia no cambia. La Corte Suprema no da luz verde a los estados para que tomen medidas similares. En última instancia, el Congreso tiene la responsabilidad, y tenemos que obligarlos a actuar para que ofrezcan las soluciones reales que nuestro país necesita”.

    “El NCLR trabajará con su red de casi 300 organizaciones comunitarias afiliadas para proveer información acerca de la decisión de la corte, educar a la comunidad sobre cómo defender sus derechos civiles e intensificar la participación de los votantes”, concluyó Murguía.

    El NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) es la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos y trabaja para mejorar sus oportunidades. Para más información sobre el NCLR, por favor visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

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    The Supreme Court has issued a mixed ruling in its review of the Obama Administration's challenge to Arizona's anti-immigrant law known as SB 1070.

    First, the good news: by a 5-3 vote, the Justices struck down most components of the law under consideration, sending a clear signal that these types of laws are unconstitutional and reaffirming that the federal government has primary responsibility on immigration. The sections struck down were: Section 3, criminalizing the failure to carry alien registration documents; Section 5(C), criminalizing the seeking of work without authorization; and Section 6, allowing warrantless arrests when an officer has “probable cause” to believe that a person has committed a crime that makes that person removable from the United States.

    The bad news: the Court did not strike down Section 2B, the “papers, please” racial profiling provision, leaving it for others to address. This section of the law requires officers to check the status of anyone they stop or arrest if there is a “reasonable suspicion” that the person is unlawfully present. This provision was the core issue for most people following the case; however, the case was not argued on civil rights grounds. It is important to note, though, that the Court did not give states a green light to advance copycat measures and did not foreclose other preemption and constitutional challenges to the law. Those challenges will now continue, and lawsuits are already pending.

    By upholding the “papers, please” section of SB 1070, the Supreme Court failed to decisively remove the bull’s eye from the backs of Arizona’s Latinos, leaving the issue for future lawsuits to address. Those future challenges are already moving forward, as racial profiling and civil rights violations should not stand in Arizona or anywhere else. Arizona—personified by ‘America’s worst sheriff’ Joe Arpaio and documented by an exhaustive Department of Justice report—already has a sorry history when it comes to violating and abusing the rights of Hispanics simply based on the way they look or sound.

    This decision intensifies the call to action for the Latino community. Three provisions were struck down, but there is still one to go. The fight continues in the legislatures, in the courts, and in the voting booth. There will be a need to educate our communities so they can advocate for their rights, and for our government to send civil rights monitors to states that seek to legitimize racial profiling and take action to protect victims.

    On SB 1070, the answer to the question “which side are you on?” will stay in the minds of Latino voters for years to come. Those who embrace legislating cruelty and discrimination are on the wrong side of history and the wrong side of our nation’s values, and they will be held accountable.
      


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