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    By Leticia Miranda, Senior Policy Advisor, Economic Security Policy

    For 77 years, each generation has done its part to maintain our Social Security system—the foundation of our retirement security. In the past 30 years, Social Security has grown in importance as economic changes—such as the decline of labor unions and manufacturing jobs—have led to fewer companies offering retirement plans to workers, with American men being the hardest hit. Today, only a little over half of all workers have access to a private retirement plan at work, making our Social Security system more vital than ever. Latino workers rely even more heavily on Social Security, since only one-third have retirement benefits at work. Given the critical importance of our Social Security system to the vast majority of our nation’s workers, why are some politicians proposing to cut it?

    In Washington, many are arguing to dismantle our Social Security system and leave our savings to be managed by Wall Street. These voices include Representative Paul Ryan—recently chosen as a Vice Presidential nominee on the Republican ticket—and former Senator Alan Simpson and former White House staffer Erskine Bowles. They argue that we should slash middle class benefits, raise the retirement age, and cut cost-of-living protections that would hurt the lowest-income seniors—basically, they want to tear our system apart brick by brick. The biggest losers of these cuts will be the most vulnerable among us: people of color, people with disabilities, low-income workers, and women, not to mention our children and grandchildren.

    Our Social Security system is vital because it is the safest, most efficient, and most reliable way for Americans to guarantee their retirement savings. If we can’t count on Social Security in our retirement years, then what can we count on? Private retirement investments, like 401(k)s and IRAs, can be risky—even sophisticated investors can lose everything. Pension plans are disappearing, and home equity is no longer a stable bet. Social Security is the one retirement system that is reliable and that works.

    Today, 55 million Americans receive Social Security benefits, including over 2 million Latino seniors as well as disabled Latino adults and children. Latino seniors are particularly vulnerable to cuts because Social Security benefits represent nearly all of their income. While Social Security’s progressive benefit formula favors low-wage workers, average yearly benefits for Hispanic seniors are only $12,213 for men and just $9,536 for women. More than half of Latino seniors rely on Social Security for at least 90% of their income. To put it into perspective, with Social Security, about one in five Latino seniors is poor today; if our nation did not have Social Security, about half of all Latino seniors would be poor.

    In 2011, NCLR held a series of town halls in Latino communities on the subject of Social Security. One sick elderly community member shared that he lives alone on $750 per month from Social Security, does not have enough left over each month to buy food, and must rely on food banks to survive. He said he does not like having to live this way but has no other choice. Yet, the plans by Simpson and Bowles or Rep. Ryan all propose cutting benefits in ways that would make it even harder for seniors living in poverty to survive.

    A report by the Commission to Modernize Social Security, Plan for a New Future: The Impact of Social Security Reform on People of Color, lays out a plan for increasing revenue by requiring millionaires and billionaires to pay into the system at the same rate as everyone else. This option alone would eliminate most of Social Security’s long-term revenue shortfall, making harmful benefit cuts unnecessary and enabling benefit increases for the most vulnerable among us.

    Regardless of whether or not you support this specific plan, it is important to remember that the Social Security system is funded for the next two decades. Congress must ensure that all benefits can be paid in the decades to come, but this action doesn’t have to be taken in the next year or two while we are still dealing with tough economic problems. And addressing Social Security should most definitely not be rolled in with deficit legislation, since the program does not add a penny to the national deficit.

    At the end of the day, we need to do what is in the best interest of the vast majority of the American people. No one should have to work their entire life only to retire into poverty. Our Social Security system has never missed a payment to those who have depended on it for 77 years; and with careful resolve, we can ensure that our system will continue to be the foundation of retirement security for another 77 years and beyond.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:

    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    Washington, D.C.—Yesterday, Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer issued an executive order to deny young undocumented immigrants the opportunity to apply for driver’s licenses. NCLR (National Council of La Raza) is appalled that Gov. Brewer is again pursuing mean-spirited policies and compounding the climate of fear and mistrust that already exists among Arizona’s immigrant community thanks to SB 1070, Arizona’s extreme anti-immigrant law. 

    “Once again demonstrating her real agenda when it comes to immigration, Governor Brewer is still playing political games at the expense of many of her constituents,” said Janet Murguía, NCLR President and CEO. “In a feeble attempt to score a political point against the president’s humane and sensible action, she has resorted to a petty, cruel slap in the face to thousands of young Arizonans.”

    “But not even Jan Brewer’s spiteful action will mar a thrilling day for the thousands of young people in Arizona and hundreds of thousands more across the nation who will take their first steps on their way to the American Dream, thanks to deferred action,” Murguía continued.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

    Contact:
    Julian Teixeira
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    (202) 776-1812

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—As the nation’s children head back to school and as we edge closer to the 2012 November elections, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) will host a timely telephonic briefing for media to discuss new research that highlights the impact of high-quality early learning for Latino children and what elected officials can do to help improve students’ chances for future success. In the past 20 years, the Latino under-18 population has more than doubled, and by 2035, one in every three children in the U.S. will be Latino—a major portion of tomorrow’s workforce that the nation cannot afford to leave behind. 

    The quality of the early learning experience has been proven to help narrow the school readiness gap and affords children lasting educational benefits. Moreover, research by Nobel Prize– winning University of Chicago Economics Professor James Heckman has shown that investing in early learning has a return of up to 10 percent. Experts will discuss findings from Professor Heckman’s work and will also discuss how effective family engagement, assessment, instruction, and professional development strategies can help deliver the high-quality early learning experience that will keep America competitive in an increasingly competitive global marketplace.

    As we approach the political conventions and presidential debate season, education will surely be a focal point for both parties. Speakers at the briefing will also touch on important policy changes that would help to significantly advance access to and quality of early learning for Latino children across the U.S.

    MEDIA ADVISORY

    WHAT:
    Telephonic briefing on Smart Investments: Early Learning for Latino Children

    WHO:
    Moderator:
    --Liany Elba Arroyo, Associate Director, Education and Children’s Policy Project, NCLR 

    Speakers:
    --Rich Neimand, President/Creative Director, Neimand Collaborative
    --Erika Beltrán, Senior Policy Analyst, Education and Children’s Policy Project, NCLR

    WHEN:
    Thursday, August 23, 2012
    1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.

    WHERE:
    Participant Dial-In: (800) 895-0231
    *Conference ID: EDUCATION
    Program Title: Early Learning

    To RSVP for this event or to get more information, please send an email to jteixeira@nclr.org.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

    ###

     


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    If Latinos ever needed reasons to register to vote, this week provided two of the most compelling.

    Reason #1: This week was a historic one for the immigrant rights movement. On Wednesday, DREAMers around the country lined up to file for deferred action that will protect them from deportation proceedings for two years.

    The images coming in that day were inspiring and marked what many Latinos hope is the beginning of much more substantive immigration reform.

    Owly Images
    More than 12,000 DREAMers filled Chicago’s Navy Pier to apply for deferred action.
    Source: Reform Immigration for America

    It wasn't long, however, before the anti-immigrant folks inserted their hate into the news coverage of the momentous occasion. While thousands of young undocumented immigrants prepared for the process, Arizona Governor Jan Brewer was busy issuing an executive order to all state agencies directing them to deny public benefits, such as drivers’ licenses, to anyone who obtains a work permit under President Obama's new immigration policy.

    In a statement issued yesterday, NCLR’s President and CEO, Janet Murguía, called Brewer's move “…A feeble attempt to score a political point against the president’s humane and sensible action…a petty, cruel slap in the face to thousands of young Arizonans.”

    Shameful.

    Oh, but wait. There's more.

    Reason #2: That same day, a state court in Pennsylvania upheld the state's controversial voter ID law, which threatens the ability of about 750,000 eligible Pennsylvanians to vote in the upcoming elections. The majority of those affected, it must be noted, are Latinos, Blacks, other minority voters, the elderly, and college students.

    To make matters worse, Puerto Ricans, who make up half of the state’s Latino population, may face an additional hardship—in 2010, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico invalidated all of its birth certificates and required the issuance of new forms. Many are still waiting for their applications to be renewed, which means that those without a photo ID won't have their documents in time to vote in the upcoming election.

    “We really need to question the purpose of [the voter ID] law when those responsible for helping place it on the books already admitted that voter ID fraud in Pennsylvania is nonexistent,” said Clarissa Martínez-de-Castro, NCLR's Director of Civic Engagement in a statement.

    Supporters of the law say it's needed to curb the “rampant voter fraud” happening in the Keystone state. Yet, earlier this month, Pennsylvania conceded that there were no known cases of in-person voter ID fraud in the state’s history. In fact, across the whole country from 2000–2010, there have been only 10 cases of voter fraud. You read that right.

    We're not taking this ruling sitting down. We're working with Pennsylvania Affiliates to register thousands of Latino voters. We want Pennsylvanian Latinos to stand up and let their elected officials know that voter suppression won't fly, or else pay the price with their seats.

    So, there you have it, two compelling reasons to vote.

    There's a lot riding on this election and at 50 million strong, Latinos are uniquely positioned to flex their political muscle at the polls. To do that, however, we've got to register and then we've got to get out the vote on Election Day.

    If we don't, we might as well get used to seeing more voter suppression and anti-immigrant policies take root across the nation. 


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    We hope you had a good week and we wish you an even better weekend! Here are some of your favorite posts from NCLR's social media networks this week.


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    Our President and CEO joined a panel of Latino celebrities and political officials last night for a town hall about the Latino vote and the issues important to our community. Hot topics included immigration, education, and, of course, the economy.

    The nuvoTV special "We Decide: Latinos and the 2012 Election" premiered Sunday night on the cable network, but you can watch the full program below.


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    By Marlo Heresco Education, VOXXI

    Originally published by VOXXI as: "What is the Moms Return to School grant for single mothers?"

    The Moms Return to School scholarship program is designed to offer education grants to single mothers. These grants, which are federally and privately funded, are available to more than 200,000 single mothers in the United States.

    Despite unfavorable economic times, or perhaps in spite of them, the United States government remains committed to helping single mothers finish their education. The thought process is that returning to school while the economy remains in a downturn will see many single mothers qualified and prepared to fill job positions once the recession ends.

    What is the Moms Return to School grant?
    The Moms Return to School grant is a specified non-repayable sum of money given to more than 200,000 eligible single mothers to complete any level of education. The Obama administration has set federal grants worth up to $10,000 for eligible single mothers.

    The grants can be applied to any qualifying college or university tuition fees. This includes online courses. 

    In addition to this grant, the new Federal Pell Grant bill, sees an increase in existing education grants and can add another $5,000 of grant money to low-income single mother students.

    Where can single mothers use these grants?
    The grants can be applied to any qualifying college or university tuition fees. This includes online courses for single mothers who are unable to attend a physical campus, or single mothers who prefer to remain at home with their children.

    The grant money can be used toward course fees, books, transportation and even Internet bills for single mothers who choose to complete their education at home.

    Who is eligible for the grants?
    Single mothers in the United States with low incomes are eligible to apply for Obama’s Moms Return to School grants. Whether you are a non-working stay at home mother, a full-time working mom, or a part-time working mother, you can be eligible for a grant.

    How do I apply?
    Mothers who have a completed education place themselves in an improved financial position by qualifying for better career opportunities. 

    The first step to eligibility is to apply for the federal student aid online through FAFSA . The application is free to fill out and requires basic information to determine if a single mother is a possible candidate for the education grant.

    What are the benefits of going back to school?
    Millions of single mothers struggle to make ends meet – to pay the bills, feed their families and meet basic healthcare and education needs. Mothers who have a completed education place themselves in an improved financial position by qualifying for better career opportunities. Going back to school as a single mother provides a positive influence by becoming an encouraging role model for their children.


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    PARA DIFUSIÓN IMMEDIATA

    Contacto:
    Julián Teixeira
    (202) 776-1812
    jteixeira@nclr.org

     

    Programa mejorará el acceso de los latinos a los conocimientos financieros y vitales servicios bancarios

    LOS ANGELES—Para administrar exitosamente sus finanzas, las familias deben tener no sólo acceso a servicios bancarios, sino también la información y educación para poder comprenderlos bien. Los latinos conforman una de las comunidades del país que más carecen de servicios bancarios, ya que con frecuencia experimentan barreras para tener acceso a la amplia gama de servicios financieros—desde algo tan básico como el abrir una cuenta de cheques hasta el entender bien el sistema hipotecario para comprar una vivienda. Para ayudar a cerrar esa brecha, NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) y la East L.A. Community Corporation (ELACC) se han unido para lanzar el programa Administración Eficaz del Dinero. Este programa ofrece capacitar a individuos de bajos o moderados ingresos de la región Este de Los Ángeles sobre temas financieros y los servicios bancarios disponibles.

    “Las familias latinas han sido afectadas de manera desproporcionada por la crisis económica, lo que los ha llevado a agotar sus ahorros y se los ha eliminado del sistema bancario”, dijo Lot Díaz, Vicepresidente de Desarrollo de Vivienda y Comunidad de NCLR. “Uno de los primeros pasos hacia la recuperación es llegar a ser financieramente estable mediante la reducción de los niveles de endeudamiento y la creación de una reserva de dinero en efectivo. Sin embargo, muchas personas en nuestra comunidad no pueden hacer esto, ya que requiere no sólo contar con las herramientas financieras, sino también una orientación y educación sobre el tema. Por ello, hemos creado el programa Administración Eficaz del Dinero para ayudar a las familias hispanas a que accedan a las herramientas adecuadas para fomentar las decisiones financieras que no sólo crean riqueza, pero también—en términos generales—mejoran sus vidas”.

    Los participantes del programa Administración Eficaz del Dinero se inscribirán en un curso de cinco semanas y se reunirán, en forma individual, con un consejero financiero provisto por ELACC. El curso y el entrenamiento tendrán como meta aumentar los conocimientos y desarrollar las capacidades para manejar presupuestos, servicios bancarios, ahorros, seguros, el establecimiento y mantenimiento del buen crédito y la protección de los activos. Los consejeros trabajarán con los participantes para evaluar sus situaciones financieras actuales, ayudar a diseñar un plan de acción de corto y largo plazo para lograr su progreso económico y llevar a cabo el seguimiento durante un período de 12 meses.

    “Estamos muy entusiasmados de habernos asociado con NCLR para lanzar el programa Administración Eficaz del Dinero”, dijo María Cabildo, Presidenta de ELACC. “Nuestros clientes se beneficiarán enormemente de este programa dado el limitado acceso de nuestra comunidad a los servicios bancarios básicos y al conocimiento de cómo establecer ahorros de emergencia. Creemos que el programa es un paso importante para ayudar a las familias latinas de Los Ángeles a manejar mejor su dinero y guiarlas al camino correcto para mejorar su situación financiera”.

    Una encuesta reciente de NCLR realizada en California demostró que el 21 por ciento de los latinos no tienen cuentas bancarias. Ese hecho también se reflejó en 2009 en los datos de la Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) que revelaron que el 19,3 por ciento de la población latina carecía de servicios bancarios. Los que no tienen una cuenta bancaria, o los que no están utilizando eficazmente sus cuentas corrientes, por lo general dependen de costosos servicios financieros alternativos, como tiendas de cambio de cheques. Las personas con menos acceso a los servicios financieros tradicionales pueden llegar a gastar un promedio de $700 por año en servicios por transacciones de pago.

    “Los datos reflejan claramente la necesidad de este programa”, dijo Díaz. “Si podemos conseguir que las familias latinas tengan acceso al sistema bancario se podrá evitar el pago de costosas tarifas asociadas a instituciones financieras no tradicionales y comenzar a ahorrar con regularidad. Estos dos son los pasos críticos hacia la construcción de un futuro financiero más estable”.

    ###
     


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Julian Teixeira
    (202) 776-1812
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    Program to enhance access to financial knowledge and vital banking services for Latinos

    LOS ANGELES—In order to manage their finances successfully, families need not only access to banking services but the information and education to understand them. Latinos are one of the most un- and underbanked communities in the nation, often experiencing barriers to the range of financial services—from something as basic as opening a checking account to understanding how to apply for a home mortgage. To help bridge this gap, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) and the East LA Community Corporation (ELACC) are joining together to launch the Effective Money Management program to provide one-on-one financial coaching and information about banking products to qualified low- and moderate-income individuals in the East Los Angeles region.

    “Latino families have been disproportionately affected by the economic downturn, which has depleted their savings and knocked them out of the banking system,” said Lot Diaz, Vice President of Housing and Community Development at NCLR. “One of the first steps toward recovery is to become financially stable by reducing debt levels and building a cash reserve. However, many in our community can’t do this because it requires not only financial tools but education and guidance. We created the Effective Money Management program to help Hispanic families access the proper tools to promote financial decisions that not only build wealth but improve their lives overall.”

    Participants in the Effective Money Management program will enroll in a five-week course and meet one-on-one with financial coaches provided through ELACC. The course and coaching will focus on increasing knowledge and developing skills in budgeting, banking services, establishing and maintaining credit, savings, insurance, and protecting one’s assets. Counselors will work with participants to assess their current financial situations, help tailor a financial action plan to both short- and long-term financial goals, and track progress over a 12-month period.

    “We are very excited to be partnering with NCLR on the Effective Money Management program,” said Maria Cabildo, President of ELACC. “Our clients will greatly benefit from this program given our community’s limited access to basic banking services and knowledge of how to build emergency savings. We believe that the program is an important step in helping Los Angeles Latino families better manage their money, putting them on the right path to improve their financial situation.”

    A recent NCLR survey of Hispanics in California shows that 21 percent of Latinos are unbanked—mirroring national 2009 FDIC data, which reported 19.3 percent of all Latinos as unbanked. Those who do not have a bank account, or those who are not effectively using their current accounts, typically rely on costly alternative financial services such as check cashing stores. Individuals with less access to traditional financial products can spend an average of $700 annually on transaction services charges.

    “The data clearly show the need for this program,” said Diaz. “If we can get Latino families into the banking system, they can avoid costly fees associated with nontraditional financial institutions and begin saving regularly, both of which are critical steps toward building a more stable financial future.”

    ###


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    PARA DIFUSIÓN IMMEDIATA

    Contacto:

    Julián Teixeira
    (202) 776-1812
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    Programa mejorará el acceso de los latinos a los conocimientos financieros y vitales servicios bancarios

    LOS ANGELES—Para administrar exitosamente sus finanzas, las familias deben tener no sólo acceso a servicios bancarios, sino también la información y educación para poder comprenderlos bien. Los latinos conforman una de las comunidades del país que más carecen de servicios bancarios, ya que con frecuencia experimentan barreras para tener acceso a la amplia gama de servicios financieros—desde algo tan básico como el abrir una cuenta de cheques hasta el entender bien el sistema hipotecario para comprar una vivienda. Para ayudar a cerrar esa brecha, NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) y la East L.A. Community Corporation (ELACC) se han unido para lanzar el programa Manejo de Efectivo. Este programa ofrece capacitar a individuos de bajos o moderados ingresos de la región Este de Los Ángeles sobre temas financieros y los servicios bancarios disponibles.

    “Las familias latinas han sido afectadas de manera desproporcionada por la crisis económica, lo que los ha llevado a agotar sus ahorros y se los ha eliminado del sistema bancario”, dijo Lot Díaz, Vicepresidente de Desarrollo de Vivienda y Comunidad de NCLR. “Uno de los primeros pasos hacia la recuperación es llegar a ser financieramente estable mediante la reducción de los niveles de endeudamiento y la creación de una reserva de dinero en efectivo. Sin embargo, muchas personas en nuestra comunidad no pueden hacer esto, ya que requiere no sólo contar con las herramientas financieras, sino también una orientación y educación sobre el tema. Por ello, hemos creado el programa Manejo de Efectivo para ayudar a las familias hispanas a que accedan a las herramientas adecuadas para fomentar las decisiones financieras que no sólo crean riqueza, pero también—en términos generales—mejoran sus vidas”.

    Los participantes del programa Manejo de Efectivo se inscribirán en un curso de cinco semanas y se reunirán, en forma individual, con un consejero financiero provisto por ELACC. El curso y el entrenamiento tendrán como meta aumentar los conocimientos y desarrollar las capacidades para manejar presupuestos, servicios bancarios, ahorros, seguros, el establecimiento y mantenimiento del buen crédito y la protección de los activos. Los consejeros trabajarán con los participantes para evaluar sus situaciones financieras actuales, ayudar a diseñar un plan de acción de corto y largo plazo para lograr su progreso económico y llevar a cabo el seguimiento durante un período de 12 meses.

    “Estamos muy entusiasmados de habernos asociado con NCLR para lanzar el programa Manejo de Efectivo”, dijo María Cabildo, Presidenta de ELACC. “Nuestros clientes se beneficiarán enormemente de este programa dado el limitado acceso de nuestra comunidad a los servicios bancarios básicos y al conocimiento de cómo establecer ahorros de emergencia. Creemos que el programa es un paso importante para ayudar a las familias latinas de Los Ángeles a manejar mejor su dinero y guiarlas al camino correcto para mejorar su situación financiera”.

    Una encuesta reciente de NCLR realizada en California demostró que el 21 por ciento de los latinos no tienen cuentas bancarias. Ese hecho también se reflejó en 2009 en los datos de la Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) que revelaron que el 19,3 por ciento de la población latina carecía de servicios bancarios. Los que no tienen una cuenta bancaria, o los que no están utilizando eficazmente sus cuentas corrientes, por lo general dependen de costosos servicios financieros alternativos, como tiendas de cambio de cheques. Las personas con menos acceso a los servicios financieros tradicionales pueden llegar a gastar un promedio de $700 por año en servicios por transacciones de pago.

    “Los datos reflejan claramente la necesidad de este programa”, dijo Díaz. “Si podemos conseguir que las familias latinas tengan acceso al sistema bancario se podrá evitar el pago de costosas tarifas asociadas a instituciones financieras no tradicionales y comenzar a ahorrar con regularidad. Estos dos son los pasos críticos hacia la construcción de un futuro financiero más estable”.

    ELACC fue fundada en 1995 para abogar por la justicia económica y social en Boyle Heights y el Este de Los Ángeles mediante la creación de liderazgo comunitario, el desarrollo de viviendas asequibles y activos económicos para la comunidad, y la facilitación del acceso a oportunidades de desarrollo económico para las familias de bajos y moderados ingresos. Anualmente, los programas y servicios de ELACC llegan a más de 3.000 familias.

    El NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) es la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos y trabaja para mejorar sus oportunidades. Para más información sobre el NCLR, por favor visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

    ###


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org
     

    11th Circuit Court of Appeals also rejects most other provisions of Alabama’s and Georgia’s anti-immigrant laws

    Washington, D.C.—Yesterday, the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta struck down major portions of the anti-immigrant laws passed in Alabama and Georgia, including a provision requiring Alabama public school officials to determine the immigration status of enrolling students. In the wake of the Supreme Court ruling on Arizona’s SB 1070, a federal court once again rejected these states’ attempts to take federal law into their own hands.

    “In a common-sense decision, the 11th Circuit Court put a stop to perhaps the single most egregious provision yet in this slew of anti-immigrant laws, bringing an end to the chaos and fear that students in Alabama have endured since this law was passed,” said Janet Murguía, President and CEO of NCLR (National Council of La Raza). “The Court’s ruling makes clear that children should not be put in the crosshairs of a political debate.”

    The court also blocked the Alabama provisions that would have invalidated contracts with undocumented immigrants and criminalized the failure to carry immigration documents. In both Alabama and Georgia, the court determined that states could not criminalize the transporting or harboring of certain immigrants. As with the Supreme Court, the federal court in Atlanta explicitly left the door open to future challenges to the racial profiling provisions known as “show me your papers” or “papers, please.”

    “Unfortunately, the ‘papers, please’ provision was allowed to go forward,” said Murguía. “As we have stated repeatedly, it is a false solution that many states have already rejected and whose only effect will be negative and harmful. But there is no doubt in our mind that this provision will also eventually be overturned.”

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Julian Teixeira (202) 776-1812
    jteixeira@nclr.org


    Program to enhance access to financial knowledge and vital banking services for Latinos

    Washington, D.C.—In order to manage their finances successfully, families need not only access to banking services but the information and education to understand them. Latinos are one of the most un- and underbanked communities in the nation, often experiencing barriers to a range of financial services—from something as basic as opening a checking account to understanding how to apply for a home mortgage. To help bridge this gap, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) and the Latino Economic Development Center (LEDC) are joining together to launch the Effective Money Management program to provide one-on-one financial coaching and information about banking products to qualified low- and moderate-income individuals in the Washington, D.C. area.

    “Latino families have been disproportionately affected by the economic downturn, which has depleted their savings and knocked them out of the banking system,” said Lot Diaz, Vice President of Housing and Community Development at NCLR. “One of the first steps toward recovery is to become financially stable by reducing debt levels and building a cash reserve. However, many in our community can’t do this because it requires not only financial tools but education and guidance. We created the Effective Money Management program to help Hispanic families access the proper tools to promote financial decisions that not only build wealth but improve their lives overall.”

    Participants in the Effective Money Management program will enroll in a five-week course and meet one-on-one with financial coaches provided through LEDC. The course and coaching will focus on increasing knowledge and developing skills in budgeting, banking services, establishing and maintaining credit, savings, insurance, and protecting one’s assets. Counselors will work with participants to assess their current financial situations, help tailor a financial action plan to both short- and long-term financial goals, and track progress over a 12-month period.

    “We are very excited to partner with NCLR on the Effective Money Management program,” said Manny Hidalgo, LEDC Executive Director. “Participants in our programs will greatly benefit from this initiative given that many lack access to basic banking services and the knowledge of how to build emergency savings. We believe that the program is an important step in helping Washington, D.C.–area Latino families better manage their money, a critical step on the road to achieving financial independence.”

    A recent NCLR survey of Hispanics in California shows that 21 percent of Latinos are unbanked—mirroring national 2009 FDIC data, which reported 19.3 percent of all Latinos as unbanked. Those who do not have a bank account, or those who are not effectively using their current accounts, typically rely on costly alternative financial services such as check cashing stores. Individuals with less access to traditional financial products can spend an average of $700 annually on transaction services charges.

    “The data clearly show the need for this program,” said Diaz. “If we can get Latino families into the banking system, they can avoid costly fees associated with nontraditional financial institutions and begin saving regularly, both of which are critical steps toward building a more stable financial future.”

    The Latino Economic Development Center (LEDC) equips Latinos and other D.C.-area residents with the skills and financial tools to create a better future for their families and communities. Participants in our programs learn how to buy and stay in their homes, take control of decisions affecting their apartment buildings, and start or expand small businesses. The entire D.C. area is stronger when all families have the power to achieve financial independence and join with their neighbors to improve their quality of life. For more information, go to www.ledcmetro.org, or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Latinos. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org, or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

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    PARA DIFUSIÓN IMMEDIATA

    Contacto:
    Julián Teixeira
    (202) 776-1812
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    Programa mejorará el acceso de los latinos a los conocimientos financieros y vitales servicios bancarios

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—Para administrar exitosamente sus finanzas, las familias deben tener no sólo acceso a servicios bancarios, sino también la información y educación para poder comprenderlos bien. Los latinos conforman una de las comunidades del país que más carecen de servicios bancarios, ya que con frecuencia experimentan barreras para tener acceso a la amplia gama de servicios financieros—desde algo tan básico como el abrir una cuenta de cheques hasta el entender bien el sistema hipotecario para comprar una vivienda. Para ayudar a cerrar esa brecha, NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) y El Latino Economic Development Center (LEDC) se han unido para lanzar el programa Manejo de Efectivo. Este programa ofrece capacitar a individuos de bajos o moderados ingresos de la región del Distrito de Columbia sobre temas financieros y los servicios bancarios disponibles.

    “Las familias latinas han sido afectadas de manera desproporcionada por la crisis económica, lo que los ha llevado a agotar sus ahorros y se los ha eliminado del sistema bancario”, dijo Lot Díaz, Vicepresidente de Desarrollo de Vivienda y Comunidad de NCLR. “Uno de los primeros pasos hacia la recuperación es llegar a ser financieramente estable mediante la reducción de los niveles de endeudamiento y la creación de una reserva de dinero en efectivo. Sin embargo, muchas personas en nuestra comunidad no pueden hacer esto, ya que requiere no sólo contar con las herramientas financieras, sino también una orientación y educación sobre el tema. Por ello, hemos creado el programa Manejo de Efectivo para ayudar a las familias hispanas a que accedan a las herramientas adecuadas para fomentar las decisiones financieras que no sólo crean riqueza, pero también—en términos generales—mejoran sus vidas”.

    Los participantes del programa Manejo de Efectivo se inscribirán en un curso de cinco semanas y se reunirán, en forma individual, con un consejero financiero provisto por LEDC. El curso y el entrenamiento tendrán como meta aumentar los conocimientos y desarrollar las capacidades para manejar presupuestos, servicios bancarios, ahorros, seguros, el establecimiento y mantenimiento del buen crédito y la protección de los activos. Los consejeros trabajarán con los participantes para evaluar sus situaciones financieras actuales, ayudar a diseñar un plan de acción de corto y largo plazo para lograr su progreso económico y llevar a cabo el seguimiento durante un período de 12 meses.

    “Estamos muy entusiasmados de habernos asociado con NCLR para lanzar el programa Manejo de Efectivo”, dijo Manny Hidalgo, presidente de LEDC. “Nuestros participantes se beneficiarán enormemente de este programa dado el limitado acceso de nuestra comunidad a los servicios bancarios básicos y al conocimiento de cómo establecer ahorros de emergencia. Creemos que el programa es un paso importante para ayudar a las familias latinas del Distrito de Columbia a manejar mejor su dinero, un paso crítico para llegar a tener su independencia económica.”
    Una encuesta reciente de NCLR realizada en California demostró que el 21 por ciento de los latinos no tienen cuentas bancarias. Ese hecho también se reflejó en 2009 en los datos de la Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) que revelaron que el 19,3 por ciento de la población latina carecía de servicios bancarios. Los que no tienen una cuenta bancaria, o los que no están utilizando eficazmente sus cuentas corrientes, por lo general dependen de costosos servicios financieros alternativos, como tiendas de cambio de cheques. Las personas con menos acceso a los servicios financieros tradicionales pueden llegar a gastar un promedio de $700 por año en servicios por transacciones de pago.

    “Los datos reflejan claramente la necesidad de este programa”, dijo Díaz. “Si podemos conseguir que las familias latinas tengan acceso al sistema bancario se podrá evitar el pago de costosas tarifas asociadas a instituciones financieras no tradicionales y comenzar a ahorrar con regularidad. Estos dos son los pasos críticos hacia la construcción de un futuro financiero más estable”.

    El Latino Economic Development Center (LEDC) equipa a los hispanos y a otros residentes del Distrito de Columbia con herramientas financieras y capacitación para crear un mejor futuro para sus familias y sus comunidades. Los participantes de nuestros programas aprenden a comprar sus viviendas y a permanecer en ellas, adquirir el control sobre decisiones sobre problemas que afectan a los edificios de apartamentos e iniciar o ampliar sus pequeñas empresas. Toda el área del Distrito de Columbia es más fuerte cuando todas las familias tienen el poder para llegar a tener su independencia económica y, uniéndose a sus vecinos, mejorar su calidad de vida. Para más información, visite www.ledcmetro.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter

    El NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) es la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos y trabaja para mejorar sus oportunidades. Para más información sobre el NCLR, por favor visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

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    For Immediate Release                                       Contact
    August 22, 2012                                                     Laura Pereyra, 202.203.8689
                                                                                  lpereyra@americanprogress.org

    Release:  New Report Finds Students of Color Are Being Shortchanged:  Schools Spend $334 More on White Students Than on Students of Color

    Washington, D.C. — On a press call today with Rep. Chaka Fattah (D-PA), the Center for American Progress unveiled a new report that explores the racial inequities in state and local funding that persist in our nation's schools. According to the study, called "Unequal Education,” schools across the nation continue to treat students of color differently than their white peers because of a federal loophole that permits districts to spend significantly less on schools with large populations of students of color.

    Though nearly 60 years ago the landmark ruling in Brown v. the Board of Education overturned the concept that “separate” education could be “equal,” today almost 40 percent of minority students attend segregated schools where more than 90 percent of students are nonwhite. Likewise, the average white student attends a school where 77 percent of his or her classmates are also white.

    "The United States has the most inequitable system for funding its schools of any advanced country, and as this report shows, students of color bear the brunt of that inequity," said Cynthia Brown, Vice President for Education Policy at the Center for American Progress. "Our top priority must be ensuring students of color and all students receive their fair share of resources."

    The spending difference between these schools is significant: Mostly white schools spend $733 more per student than mostly nonwhite schools. In fact, based on newly released nationwide data on per-student educational spending, the report finds that:
    •    Across the country schools spent $334 more on every white student than on every nonwhite student.
    •    Mostly white schools (90 percent or more white) spent $733 more per student than mostly nonwhite schools (90 percent or more nonwhite).
    •    The United States spends $293 less per year on students in mostly nonwhite schools than on students in all other schools. That’s 7 percent of the median per-pupil spending.
    •    As the number of students of color goes up at a school, the amount of money spent on students goes down: An increase of 10 percent in students of color is associated with a decrease in spending of $75 per student.
    •    The so-called comparability loophole in Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, which requires school districts to provide educational services to their lower-poverty schools that are “comparable” to those provided to the higher-poverty schools, is a major source of educational inequity for both students of color and low-income students.

    "Given the fact that Latino students continue to lag behind in almost every indicator of academic success, these funding inequities are simply unacceptable. We can no longer afford to continue to under-invest in students of color if we have any intention of getting out of this educational crisis,” said Erika Beltran, a senior policy analyst at the National Council of La Raza.

    To address the serious implications of this funding gap, report author Ary Spatig-Amerikaner recommends gradually closing the comparability loophole—the federal policy that, in exchange for Title I money, is supposed to guard against funding inequities between schools receiving Title I funds and non-Title I schools but often fails in this regard. Under current policy, schools do not report the amount actually spent on teacher salaries at each school; instead, they are required to use the district average teacher salary when calculating school-level comparability between Title I and non-Title I schools. This major exclusion often leads school districts to think they are providing equal funding to high-poverty and low-poverty schools in accordance with Title I when, in fact, they aren’t.

    Closing the comparability loophole would mean schools would accurately report overall expenditures for each school, and that local and state funding would be more fairly distributed to high-need schools. While closing the comparability loophole is not a magic bullet, equalizing intradistrict per-pupil spending is a significant step toward fully honoring the intent and spirit of Brown v. Board of Education.

    Read the report:
    •    “Unequal Education: Federal Loophole Enables Lower Spending on Students of Color” by Ary Spatig-Amerikaner

    To listen to today's press call, click here.

    Related resources:
    •    Students of Color Still Receiving Unequal Education

    To speak to experts on this topic, please contact Laura Pereyra at lpereyra@americanprogress.org or 202.203.8689.

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    Hispanic children make up a quarter of American children under the age of five and are the fastest-growing subgroup of American children. Despite their growing presence, young Latino children continue to be disproportionately underenrolled in early childhood education programs, leaving them at a disadvantage for success in school and in life. In a time of economic challenges, it is important that policymakers invest in early childhood education programs, a strategy with a proven record of yielding better outcomes for children and high economic payoffs.

    NCLR has profiled four early childhood education programs from our network of Affiliates that exemplify best practices in serving young Latino and ELL children and their families. Each report profiles one Affiliate and provides policy recommendations to help bring these programs to scale. Click on each link below to read the reports.

    Preparing Young Latino Children for School Success: Best Practices in Professional Development

    Preparing Young Latino Children for School Success: Best Practices in Student Assessments

    Preparing Young Latino Children for School Success: Best Practices in Lanugage Instruction

    Preparing Young Latino Children for School Success: Best Practices in Family Engagement


     


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Julian Teixeira
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    202) 776-1812

    Links between quality early learning and long-term educational success for Latino students discussed during press briefing

    Washington, D.C.—Today, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) held a telephonic press briefing to release new research by the organization highlighting best practices in early childhood education programs that are promoting positive academic and social outcomes for young Latino children. NCLR is releasing this research at a time when children across the country are heading back to school and the presidential campaigns are addressing the nation’s most challenging issues. NCLR Education and Children’s Policy Project Senior Policy Analyst Erika Beltrán and Associate Director Liany Elba Arroyo were joined by Rich Neimand, President and Creative Director of Neimand Collaborative, to discuss the importance of closing the early learning gap as well as the widely-recognized research by Nobel Prize–winning University of Chicago Economics Professor James Heckman on the economic payoffs of investing in early childhood education.

    Heckman’s renowned research has proven that high-quality early learning experiences lead to improved health, economic, and social outcomes for individuals and for society. Moreover, his research shows that investments in early development have economic returns of up to 10 percent and are critical to keep America globally competitive.

    Both NCLR’s and Heckman’s findings have broad implications for America’s Latino students—a significant and increasing percentage of today’s school-aged population. Today, Latinos represent over one of every five children in U.S. schools; however, by 2035 they will constitute one of every four.

    “Latino children often enter the school system with a disadvantage, which is why early learning programs are even more critical for this community,” noted Beltrán. “All of the prominent research in the field demonstrates that a quality, positive preschool educational experience contributes to narrowing the school readiness gap and provides long-lasting benefits.”

    Experts discussed the need for policymakers to make critical investments in high-quality early childhood education, take a more comprehensive approach to improving the quality of programs, and promote best practices that meet the demands of an increasingly diverse student population.

    “The bottom line is that without an effective early childhood development strategy, America has a deficit strategy, not a growth strategy,” stated Neimand. “Quality early childhood development is the key to upward mobility. Without it, investments made later on in education, health, higher education, and job training cannot and will not be maximized for all Americans.”

    To access NCLR issue briefs on early childhood education, please click here. For more information regarding the work of Professor James Heckman, visit www.heckmanequation.org/heckman-equation.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    By Laura Vazquez, Legislative Analyst, Immigration Policy Project, NCLR

    I recently had the opportunity to volunteer with the Central American Resource Center (CARECEN), a Washington, DC NCLR Affiliate, as they hosted a screening workshop to review documents and answer questions from young people to determine their eligibility for the brand new deferred action policy for undocumented youth.

    After months of advocating for what the policy and process should look like, it was incredible to see a room full of people eager to see if they are eligible for this temporary relief from deportation. When I arrived at CARECEN on Saturday morning, there was a line of people waiting to enter the full waiting room inside. CARECEN ran a very orderly registration, and the young people, many of whom came with their parents and siblings, were given a number and signed in so they could talk to volunteers who had been trained on the policy. People were anxious to see if they qualified and had the necessary documents to move to the next step: completing the application forms. One of the staff members of CARECEN said that the first people in line had arrived at 5:30 a.m.! The interest level was expected because CARECEN had been hosting informational sessions leading up to the screening workshop, and across the country there were reports of community-based organizations with packed events at their offices, as well.


    Nearly 12,000 DREAMers filled Chicago's Navy Pier to apply for the new immigration program.
    Source: Uploaded by user via National Immigrant on Pinterest

    I first talked with a girl who was accompanied by her mother. She had a huge three-ring binder with Winnie the Pooh on the cover that contained lots of documents to prove her presence in the U.S., neatly divided by tabs indicating each year. The papers demonstrated year after year of schooling and growing up in this country. She and her mother flipped from one sheet of paper to the next, eagerly pointing out the documents that fulfilled the requirements.

    I also met three teenage siblings and their mother. Each one of the kids had a folder with her first name on it and neatly organized papers inside. As we went through the papers of each one, the others waited patiently and followed every detail as we checked off the documents that fulfilled the criteria. As the oldest showed me her diploma from her recent high school graduation, she beamed with pride when I congratulated her and checked the box for high school diploma on the list of documents to prove she met one of the requirements to request deferred action.

    These young people will have new opportunities available to them for the first time. They will be able to continue to contribute to their communities, continue their studies, and work toward their dreams. They are the reason why we need to continue to advocate for a permanent solution so that they can become citizens and contribute to our economic and social prosperity.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Julian Teixeira
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    (202) 776-1812

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—As we gear up for the presidential conventions and the upcoming election, talk about the Ryan budget will only increase as both political parties discuss the benefits and drawbacks of the proposed plan. So far, there has been little discussion of the impact on Hispanics, and to rectify this NCLR (National Council of La Raza) will host a telephonic press briefing to discuss how the proposed Ryan budget would affect the nation’s Latino families.

    Please join NCLR experts as they explain how the Ryan budget plan would impact Latinos’ access to healthcare, education, housing, workforce development, Social Security and tax refunds. For each issue area, an NCLR expert will address the following three questions:

    • How important is each program area to Latinos?
    • What are the proposals in the Ryan budget for each issue area?
    • How would these proposed changes in the Ryan budget affect Latinos?

    MEDIA ADVISORY

    WHAT:
    Telephonic Briefing: “How Would the Ryan Budget Impact Latino Families?”

    WHO:
    Moderator: Leticia Miranda, Senior Policy Advisor, Economic and Employment Policy Project

    Speakers:
    Jennifer Ng’andu, Deputy Director, Health Policy Project
    Liany Elba Arroyo, Associate Director, Education and Children’s Policy Project
    Emma Oppenheim, Associate Director, Workforce Development Policy Initiatives

    WHEN:
    Tuesday, August 28, 2012
    1:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m. EDT

    WHERE:
    Participant: (800) 862-9098
    Conference ID: BUDGET
    Program Title: Impact of the Ryan Budget

    To RSVP for this event or to get more information, please send an email to jteixeira@nclr.org.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    Listen up DREAMers! We're hosting a webinar for young LGBT immigrants interested in applying for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

    According to the memo issued by the president August 15, youth must meet the following criteria to qualify for the program:

    • Under the age of 31 as of June 15, 2012
    • Came to the United States before reaching 16th birthday
    • Continuously resided in the United States since June 15, 2007, up to the present time
    • Physically present in the United States on June 15, 2012, and at the time of requesting consideration for deferred action from USCIS
    • Entered without inspection before June 15, 2012, or lawful immigration status expired as of June 15, 2012
    • Currently in school, have graduated or obtained a certificate of completion from high school, have obtained a General Educational Development (GED) certificate, or are an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States
    • Have not been convicted of a felony, significant misdemeanor, three or more other misdemeanors, and do not otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety.

    To help make sense of all this, we've joined with several other groups to provide all the information you need to navigate the process.

    Join the webinar/call and find out if you're eligible. Details below:

    • Reserve your webinar seat now at www3.gotomeeting.com/register/737026030. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.
    • If you do not have computer access, simply call in toll free to 1.877.273.4202 and use Conference Room 9495854.

    Hosted by: National Council of La Raza; CenterLink: The Community of LGBT Centers; Equality Federation; Human Rights Campaign; Immigration Equality; Lambda Legal; National Center for Lesbian Rights; National Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce; National Gay and Lesbian Task Force; and National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance.

    Presented by: Laura Vazquez, Immigration Legislative Analyst, National Council of La Raza

    Introduction by: Rachel Tiven, Executive Director, Immigration Equality

    Opening remarks: Prerna Lal, “Undocuqueer,” Co-Founder, DreamActivist.org and Law Clerk, Benach Ragland LLP 


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Julian Teixeira
    (202) 776-1812
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    Music Superstar Christina Aguilera Will Recieve Special Acheivement Award at the 2012 NCLR ALMA Awards® Airing Friday September, 21, (8:00-9:00 p.m. EST) on NBC

    America Ferrera, Michael Peña, Nicole Richie, and Wilmer Valderrama confirmed as presenters

    Hispanic Cable Network mun2 to Present ALMA Awards Red Carpet Special; Spanish-language Telemundo to Host Official ALMA Awards Website and Comcast’s Xfinity TV Customers to Have Access to the Show on Demand

    UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif.—Popular performers Eva Longoria and George Lopez will return as co-hosts of the 2012 NCLR ALMA Awards, a star-studded kickoff to Hispanic Heritage Month that will air Friday, September 21 from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. EDT on NBC. Christina Aguilera, a five-time Grammy winner and popular coach on NBC’s Emmy-nominated hit series The Voice, will receive the 2012 NCLR Special Achievement Award for her incredible career and exceptional work in philanthropy. America Ferrera, Michael Peña, Nicole Richie, and Wilmer Valderrama will be among the many presenters on hand to celebrate the accomplishments of some of the most prolific Latinos in the entertainment industry, spanning music, television, and film.

    This year marks the third time that Longoria and Lopez will co-host the NCLR ALMA Awards after sharing the stage in 2009 and 2011. Longoria, the Golden Globe–nominated, Screen Actors Guild Award– and ALMA Award–winning actress, producer, businesswoman, and philanthropist, is executive producer of the upcoming NBC dating series Ready for Love and just finished her eighth and final season of Desperate Housewives. The film and television star won a People’s Choice Award for “Favorite Female TV Star,” has been named one of People Magazine’s “50 Most Beautiful People,” and was selected three years in a row to the prestigious Forbes Celebrity 100, as well as being named “Philanthropist of the Year” by the Hollywood Reporter.

    Lopez is a multitalented entertainer whose career spans film, television, stand-up comedy, and late-night television. He hosted the late-night talk show Lopez Tonight for two seasons, after co-creating, writing, producing, and starring in the ground-breaking sitcom George Lopez, which ran for six seasons and remains a hit with viewers in syndication. This summer, he hosted the dating series Take Me Out and debuted his third solo stand-up special. Lopez has been named one of the “25 Most Influential Hispanics in America” by Time Magazine, and the Harris Poll named him one of the Top Ten Favorite Television Personalities.

    One of the most accomplished performers of the last decade, Aguilera has sold more than 30 million albums worldwide and won five Grammy Awards. She has released seven albums, with pop hits that include “Beautiful,” “Genie in a Bottle,” and “Dirrty,” and recently began her third season mentoring music talent as a coach on NBC’s Emmy-nominated series The Voice. No stranger to the ALMA Awards, Aguilera has received 10 nominations and taken home three ALMAs. She has served as global spokesperson for Yum! Brands’ World Hunger Relief effort since 2009 where her participation has helped raise nearly $80 million for the World Food Programme (WFP) and other hunger relief agencies. She also serves as an Ambassador Against Hunger for WFP and has traveled on relief trips with the organization to Haiti and Guatemala. Aguilera continues to also fight for gay and lesbian rights as well as helping victims of domestic violence, a cause close to her heart.

    Fans can cast their votes for their favorite nominees for the 2012 NCLR ALMA Awards online at www.ALMAAwards.com through September 7, 2012. Those who vote will be entered for a chance to win a VIP experience for two at the NCLR ALMA Awards, including airfare, hotel, VIP tickets to the show, and an invitation to the VIP Post-Party.

    Winners of the NCLR ALMA Awards will be determined by evaluating votes cast as well as box office, Nielsen, and Billboard rankings, and in consultation with the NCLR ALMA Awards Production Leadership Team. Selection rules and eligibility are posted at www.almaawards.com. Not all awards will be presented on-air during the NBC special. However, viewers can watch the remaining award presentations during the preshow streamed online via www.telemundo.com/almaawards. Viewers can also watch the entire special online after it airs via http://telemundo.com/almaawards and on www.nbc.com/alma-awards.

    The 2012 NCLR ALMA Awards will be produced by dick clark productions’ executive producers Orly Adelson and Barry Adelman, along with Eva Longoria and Janet Murguía, President and CEO of NCLR. NBC will air the initial broadcast and mun2 will present the ALMA Awards Red Carpet special and rebroadcast the show. Telemundo will host the official bilingual ALMA Awards website at www.telemundo.com/almaawards, with social media playing an integral role in the star-studded crossover show, managing the fan conversations and curating exclusive content and behind-the-scenes interviews. Comcast will leverage its cable outlets to both promote and provide the show to viewers via video on demand. Pepsi will return as the show’s Presenting Sponsor.

    For additional information, including announcements about the presenters and performers at this year’s ceremony, please visit www.almaawards.com or follow the show on Twitter at @almaawards. Information is also available at www.nbc.com/alma-awards/.

    MEDIA CONTACTS

    For NBC:
    Jill Carmen, NBC Publicity, (805) 376-1962, jcge@earthlink.net

    For the NCLR ALMA Awards:
    Jennifer Price-Keith, The Lippin Group, (323) 965-1990, jprice@lippingroup.com,
    Julian Teixeira, Director of Communications, NCLR, (202) 776-1812, jteixeira@nclr.org.

    For dick clark productions:
    Brian Rubin, PMK•BNC, (310) 854-4800, Brian.Rubin@pmkbnc.com.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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