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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE              Contact:
    October 18, 2012                               Aldira Aldape, Centro Hispano Milwaukee/Council for the Spanish Speaking, Inc., (414) 384-3700 Ext. 214
                                                                  Kathy Mimberg, NCLR, (202) 776-1714; kmimberg@nclr.org

                    
    Community town hall provides information to address concerns of Latinos in Milwaukee

    MILWAUKEE—At a community town hall held at Centro Hispano Milwaukee/Council for the Spanish Speaking (Centro Hispano) today, Latino seniors expressed strong concern over looming cuts to the financial safety net for America’s seniors and disabled.  Experts from NCLR (National Council of La Raza), AARP and Centro Hispano answered questions about the presidential candidates’ policy proposals for Social Security and Medicare.  The three organizations hosted the forum to address the importance of these programs to Latino families and the state of Wisconsin, which receives $14 billion annually in Social Security benefits paid to its residents.

    “Latinos count on our Social Security system,” said Aldira Aldape, Director of Bilingual Social Services, Centro Hispano.  “I know from my own experience talking to seniors in our community that it gives them peace of mind to know that they can rely on Social Security, the most safe, efficient and reliable system possible. It worries them to hear about potential cuts to Social Security and Medicare.”

    About half of all workers—and two-thirds of Hispanic workers—lack access to an employer-sponsored retirement plan, making our Social Security system more important than ever.  More than 2 million Latino seniors today rely on Social Security benefits they earned while working.  Latino seniors are particularly vulnerable to cuts because more than half of all Latino seniors rely on Social Security for nearly all of their income.  Average yearly benefits for Hispanic seniors are only $12,213 for men and just $9,536 for women.  Almost one in five Hispanic seniors lives in poverty, which is twice as high as for White seniors.  In Wisconsin, Social Security provided benefits to 9,523 Latino households, or about one out of nine (11.6 percent) Latino households.

    “Latino workers earn lower wages than others and are unlikely to have access to workplace retirement plans, and so rely heavily on Social Security benefits in old age,” said Leticia Miranda, Senior Policy Advisor at NCLR.  “We oppose any plans by either candidate to reduce benefits in ways that impact lower-income workers and vulnerable seniors.  Our Social Security system should be strengthened for future generations, not cut and weakened.”

    Medicare and Medicaid are also essential lifelines for vulnerable Americans.  An estimated 3.5 million Latino seniors and disabled adults and children use Medicare.  One-quarter of all Hispanics on Medicare were also covered by the Medicaid program and are extremely vulnerable to cuts to either program.  In addition, the Affordable Care Act, President Obama’s health reform law, is critical for Hispanics, since an estimated 6 million Hispanics will gain pathways to health insurance under the new program.
     
    “We’ve heard from millions of our members who are tired of partisan bickering and political spin about the important Medicare issues on the table.  The candidates owe voters straight answers about where they stand.  In a razor-tight election, candidates have a major opportunity to reach key voters with their plans for the future of Medicare—and they are taking a huge gamble if they ignore it,” said Lisa Lamkins, AARP Wisconsin Advocacy Director.
     
    Lamkins cited a recent AARP national survey which showed that voters age 50+ overwhelmingly think the candidates have not done a good job of explaining their plans on Medicare (63 percent).  Across party lines, these voters say (70 percent) that getting more information on the candidates’ plans on Medicare will help them determine their vote on Election Day.

    In Wisconsin, Social Security contributes $14 billion annually to the local economy by paying benefits to over one million Wisconsin residents, including 716,800 retirees, 146,500 disabled workers and 77,000 children.  Social Security kept 372,000 Wisconsinites out of poverty in 2008.  Medicare and Medicaid contribute another $15 billion to the economy by serving approximately one million Wisconsin residents each.  The Milwaukee forum is the seventh in a series of town halls held across the country as part of the “Latinos and Social Security:  ¡Tu Futuro Cuenta!” campaign.

    Centro Hispano Milwaukee
    is a member of the national NCLR Affiliate Network.  Centro Hispano Milwaukee, established in 1964, making it Milwaukee’s first Hispanic-serving agency, provides educational, housing and social services. For more information about Centro Hispano Milwaukee, visit www.spanishcenter-milw.org/.

    NCLR
    —the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans.  For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

    For more information about AARP, visit www.aarp.org.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Camila Gallardo
    (305) 573-7329
    cgallardo@nclr.org

    With most voter rolls closed, efforts now turn to mobilizing Hispanics to the polls

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—With most of the nation’s voter rolls closed for this election cycle, NCLR’s (National Council of La Raza) Mobilize to Vote (M2V) campaign is announcing the culmination of its voter registration efforts and the launch of an aggressive Get-Out-the-Vote (GOTV) campaign—a national, multi-platform effort to drive Latinos to the polls in November. Through its 2012 campaign, M2V registered over 90,000 new Latino voters in states across the nation, with its largest registration numbers coming from the important swing state of Florida, where NCLR registered over 54,000 new voters despite contending with tough state-imposed restrictions early on in the registration campaign.

    “We are extremely proud that over 90,000 new Latino voices have an opportunity to participate in this election and take a stand for their community because of our campaign’s efforts; increasing the number of eligible Americans who participate strengthens our democracy and our nation’s electoral system,” said Clarissa Martínez-De-Castro, NCLR Director of Civic Engagement and Immigration.

    M2V’s field operations launched in March, with canvassing operations in Florida, Nevada, Colorado and Pennsylvania, and community partner programs in California, Idaho, New York, North Carolina and Texas, where NCLR’s network of Affiliate groups helped register new Latino voters in the communities where they operate. NCLR’s voter registration efforts represent the largest of any national Hispanic organization.

    M2V’s GOTV campaign will now focus efforts on rallying Latinos to the polls and ensuring potential voters are informed about the ability to vote early or vote by mail in the states that allow voters to cast ballots prior to Election Day.

    “We want to make sure that Latino voices are heard in November and that their influence is felt at the local and national level—on Election Day and beyond,” continued Martínez-de-Castro. “It’s important that these voters are informed about their rights, so our efforts include empowering Latinos with the information they need to exercise their vote confidently come Election Day.”

    M2V’s mobile platform, which will provide up-to-date information and reminders, has 20,000 current users, and new users can join by texting the word POWER or PODER to 62571. NCLR has also partnered with celebrity supporters such as Taboo from the Grammy-winning pop group The Black Eyed Peas, who recorded a public service announcement urging young Latino voters to get involved. To view Taboo’s PSA, click here.

    To learn more about our efforts to engage Latino voters, please contact Camila Gallardo, NCLR Senior Communications Manager, at cgallardo@nclr.org or (305) 573-7329/(305) 215-4259.

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    By Ricky Garza, Communications Department, NCLR

    In the ongoing debate over immigration reform, the topic seems to finally have shifted to the people affected themselves—the over 12 million undocumented people living in the U.S. without papers, their children, and their family and friends.

    When I first arrived at Georgetown University four years ago, I was struck by the nonchalant way some of my new peers in Washington referred to the “illegals” crossing the border and to our “immigration problem.” It was jarring given where I had come from: the majority Hispanic Rio Grande Valley in Texas. For most of my life, a variety of immigration statuses among neighbors and friends was an accepted fact of life, and an unfortunate side-effect of a patchwork immigration policy applied in one of the most heavily Hispanic regions of the United States.

    Some people were citizens, others legal residents, and others went without papers or even driver’s licenses, although those facts were hardly advertised. To ask or assume whether someone was in the country legally—and skin color definitely isn’t a factor in McAllen, Texas which is 85% Latino—was impolite at best and downright discriminatory at worst.

    Our identities were not defined by a “legal” or “illegal” status worn on our sleeves. My friends in high school worried about grades, joined clubs, and applied to colleges for the most part not concerned about who was or wasn’t undocumented, or if that friend who spoke Spanish more than English was really “American enough.” My whole life was lived not imagining this could be the most important aspect about someone. But traveling outside of my hometown and listening to the national news, I found a very different story—widespread talk of “illegal immigrants” overrunning our country and taking our jobs. In that climate, one might never have guessed that the daily life I experienced in McAllen could be possible.

    News outlets like the New York Times and the Associated Press often use the term “illegal immigrant” as a concise way of signifying a person who entered the country without permission. But how can a person be illegal? Adding the “illegal” adjective to a noun representing a person makes the person himself, rather than any act he committed, illegitimate.

    Those who support using “illegal” often say, “They committed a crime, so they are illegal,” but this is a highly dubious and inaccurate assertion. Entering the United States without authorization is a civil offense, not a criminal one. Does committing another civil offense like getting a speeding ticket once, perhaps even decades ago, make you an “illegal driver” for life? No—but our continued use of this term to characterize those who committed the civil offense of entering the country without documentation betrays a deep prejudice and skepticism about the legitimacy of America’s largest minority group.

    The use of the term “illegal” is more than an issue of semantics; it is about offense and dehumanization. Describing undocumented Americans this way shifts the focus to the circumstances of their national entry and rejects the totality of their varied identities and personhood. Parents, students, and college graduates are suddenly reduced to an act that they may not even remember committing.

    Ending the use of these words in the media won’t by itself create immigration reform or quickly improve the lives of those affected, but it can provide for a much-needed change in the conversation where empathy for the real people concerned is felt by Georgetown students and Texas border residents alike. Acknowledging this and the offense the phrase “illegal immigrant” creates in the Hispanic community, the San Antonio Express-News, Huffington Post, ABC, and NBC have all agreed to end their use of the term.

    For the sake of accuracy and respect for the 50 million Hispanic Americans in the United States today, it’s time for the rest of the media to follow suit.

    Ricky Garza is an intern with the NCLR Communications Department. He is currently a senior at Georgetown University majoring in International Relations.
     


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    35,000 Signatures, a debate, and 90,000 New Voters: This Week in Social Media

    Storified by NCLR · Sun, Oct 21 2012 09:42:41

    This week, as voter registration deadlines passed across the country, we tallied up our totals and the results are in: 90,000 new Latinos registered and ready to #Mobilize2Vote! We prepared for the shift to Getting out the Vote, delivered 35,000 signatures to Obama and Romney Campaign Headquarters in Chicago and Boston to end the foreclosure crisis, and held a forum in Milwaukee on Latinos in the workforce.
    A stronger debate took place, and new polling shows a majority of Latinos support marriage equality which was revealed as we went purple for Spirit Day, and we opined on whether it's time for the media to stop using "illegal immigrant"." It's This Week in Social Media!
    Only 13% of Latino 25-29 year-olds complete a bachelor's degree. San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro wants to change that http://usat.ly/Qkb3yNNCLR
    Traveling around the country and speaking in his own city, Julian Castro thinks education should be a huge priority in the 21st Century econony. 
    Get Properly Prepared for Election Day http://wp.me/p1VU9X-52 #Mobilize2VoteNCLR
    We released this infographic in English and Spanish on fighting voter intimidation on Election Day.  Know your rights and fight disenfranchisement! 
    Fbcdn
    You need to know your rights before heading to the polls on Election Day. We've got you covered. #Mobilize2Vote http://ow.ly/i/11DJkNCLR
    Here it is again in Spanish. Conozca sus derechos!
    Fbcdn
    Hey .@BarackObama! & Hey .@MittRomney! We're still in a #foreclosure crisis! 35k of our supporters want you to know! http://ow.ly/i/11G8jNCLR
    We stepped it up and delivered 35,000 signatures to both Romney and Obama's campaign headquarters in Chicago and Boston. They need to talk about ending our foreclosure crisis now!
    #NCLR Affiliate TRP delivered 35K #Home4Good signatures to Obama HQ in Chicago just in time for the #debate. http://pic.twitter.com/i2CUJ1IkNCLR
    Great photo! Supporters deliver our 35,000 postcards for our Home for Good campaign. 
    Fbcdn
    We put Latino AIDS Awareness Day in the spotlight. Hispanics still suffer disproportionately from HIV.
    RT @voxxinews: Latino AIDS Awareness Day: Hispanics have highest rates of HIV http://bit.ly/TVkGbnNCLR
    Missed Tuesday's debate? Catch up with the immigration portion below!
    Second Presidential Debate 2012: Obama and Romney on Immigrationaljazeeraenglish
    Jose Antonio Vargas reminds us "No human being is illegal." Notice how the candidates' language is shifting.
    Great question: not "illegal aliens," not "illegals," but "immigrants without green cards." Take note @nytimes, @AP and politiciansJose Antonio Vargas
    Last night's debate saw strong performances from both candidates. Immigration was finally addressed. http://nyti.ms/R9HaRYNCLR
    While Los Angeles' Mayor Villaraigosa announces support for a new law granting City IDs to undocumented immigrants...
    Villaraigosa offers Los Angeles ID cards for immigrantsMayor Antonio Villaraigosa has taken the first step toward making the largest safe haven for immigrants, surpassing San Francisco which c...
    The governors of Nebraska and Arizona said they'll deny driver's licences to those granted Deferred Action from federal government.
    Gov. Heineman says despite federal policy, Nebraska will deny licenses to undocumented immigrantsLINCOLN, Neb. - Nebraska will continue to deny driver's licenses to young undocumentedl immigrants who are now eligible for U.S. work per...
    We hosted a townhall in Milwaukee about Social Security--Read more below!
    In Milwaukee? Curious about the presidential candidates' would change #SocialSecurity? Join us for a townhall Thursday! http://ow.ly/eyQqcNCLR
    Cuba's government finally announced an end to the dreaded "Exit Visas" required for the country's citizens.  This change could boost Cuban tourism to Florida soon.
    Reutersmedia
    Cuba lifting hated travel restrictionsThe changes reverse tough restrictions imposed in 1961 when the government tried to put the brakes on a mass migration of people fleeing ...
    We did it! So excited we were able to reach 90,000 registered voters by the close of so many deadlines!
    RT @projectvote: .@NCLR has helped more than 90,000 people register to vote. #LatinoVoteNCLR
    We turned our logo purple to celebrate Spirit Day! Read our post below to see support from our staff!
    Why We’re All About Purple Today http://wp.me/p1VU9X-6h #SpiritDay .@glaadNCLR
    Wordpress
    Support for Maryland's own DREAM Act grows and we were happy to see it.  Let's give our students more education!
    Maryland: Pass your #DREAMAct! Support for MD version grows, would give in-state tuition to undocumented students! http://wapo.st/VaJfwINCLR
    Is "illegal" what we should be calling productive undocumented Americans? Read a post on it below!
    Is it time to end "illegal immigrant" in the news? It's more than just an issue of word choice http://bit.ly/S8D2DaNCLR

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    PARA DIFUSIÓN INMEDIATA           Contacto:
    22 de octubre de 2012                    Kathy Mimberg
                                                                 (202) 776-1714
                                                                 kmimberg@nclr.org


    Nuevo recurso proporciona datos a nivel estatal sobre el bienestar de los niños hispanos, permitiendo que los votantes y los defensores de los niños evalúen mejor las prioridades de los candidatos presidenciales

    WASHINGTON, DC – El Consejo Nacional de La Raza (NCLR, por sus siglas en inglés) llevará a cabo una conferencia de prensa telefónica el jueves 25 de octubre para presentar una base de datos que ayudará a que los defensores de los niños, los políticos, los educadores y los periodistas determinen con facilidad el bienestar de los niños hispanos a nivel nacional y estatal. El "Latino Kids Data Explorer" (Explorador de Datos sobre Niños Hispanos) proporciona valores numéricos sobre 28 factores, tales como educación materna, matrícula preescolar, embarazo de adolescentes, graduación de la escuela secundaria y tasas de seguros de salud y, a la vez, permite a que los usuarios analicen las tendencias y prioricen las áreas de mejora. NCLR ha desarrollado la base de datos con la financiación de Birth to Five Policy Alliance utilizando información generada por Population Reference Bureau y Child Trends. La base de datos estará disponible al público sin costo alguno.

    Casi el 93 por ciento de los niños hispanos en los EE.UU. son ciudadanos. Un tercio de ellos vive en la pobreza y sólo el 63 por ciento se gradúan de la escuela secundaria. Teniendo en cuenta estas estadísticas, el impacto de las políticas de los candidatos presidenciales de 2012 sobre la economía y la educación  – las dos principales prioridades de los hispanos en este ciclo electoral – repercutirá drásticamente sobre estos 17,5 millones de niños, que representan casi una cuarta parte de todos los niños de EE.UU. Es fundamental tener información precisa acerca de los desafíos que enfrentan los niños hispanos para asegurar de que ellos en el futuro se conviertan en ciudadanos fuertes y productivos y que, además, estén preparados para tener éxito en una economía global. En un formato accesible, el “Latino Kids Data Explorer” de NCLR ofrece a los usuarios el mecanismo que pone en conocimiento de los votantes estos factores.

    Entre 730.000 y un millón de niños estadounidenses de origen hispano cumplirán 18 años de edad cada año entre 2010 y 2028, añadiendo más de 15,5 millones de potenciales votantes al electorado estadounidense. ¿Estarán ellos listos para liderar? Únase a nosotros en esta sesión informativa telefónica e infórmese más acerca de los niños que le darán forma al futuro de los Estados Unidos de América.

    Durante esta reunión, expertos en investigación y en políticas para la infancia explicarán las tendencias y las principales conclusiones del "Latino Kids Data Explorer” y las relacionarán con las recomendaciones de las políticas de NCLR. Para confirmar su asistencia, por favor póngase en contacto con Kathy Mimberg en kmimberg@nclr.org o al teléfono: (202)776-1714.

    AVISO A LA PRENSA

    QUIÉNES:    Clarissa Martínez-De-Castro, Directora de Participación Ciudadana e Inmigración, NCLR
                          Patricia Foxen, Directora Adjunta de Investigación, NCLR
                          Liany Elba Arroyo, Directora Asociada del Proyecto de Educación y Políticas para la Infancia, NCLR
                          Helene Stebbins, Directora Principal de Políticas, Birth to Five Policy  Alliance
           
    QUÉ:            Conferencia de prensa telefónica para presentar un nuevo recurso sobre el bienestar de los niños hispanos y tratar las recomendaciones sobre políticas que apuntan a mejorar sus oportunidades 

    CUÁNDO:    Jueves, 25 de octubre de 2012
                          1 p.m. EDT

    CÓMO:        Marque 1-866-952-7524
                         Conferencia ID: CHILDREN

    NCLR—la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles  en los Estados Unidos—trabaja para mejorar las oportunidades de los hispanoamericanos. Para obtener más información sobre el NCLR, visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE            Contact:
    October 22, 2012                            Kathy Mimberg
                                                               (202) 776-1714
                                                               kmimberg@nclr.org


    New online resource provides state-by-state data on Latino child well-being, allowing voters and child advocates to better assess candidates’ policy priorities

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—NCLR (National Council of La Raza) will hold a telephonic press briefing on Thursday, October 25 to introduce a database that will help children’s advocates, policymakers, educators and reporters easily determine the well-being of Latino children at the national and state levels.  The “Latino Kids Data Explorer” provides data points for 28 factors, such as maternal education, preschool enrollment, teen pregnancy, high school graduation and health insurance rates, and allows users to analyze trends and prioritize areas for improvement.  NCLR developed the database with funding from the Birth to Five Policy Alliance using data produced by the Population Reference Bureau and Child Trends.  It will be available to the public at no cost.
       
    Nearly 93 percent of Latino children in the U.S. are citizens.  One-third of them live in poverty and only 63 percent graduate from high school.  Given these statistics, the impact of the 2012 presidential candidates’ policies on the economy and education—the two top priorities of Latinos in this election cycle—will be acutely felt by these 17.5 million children who represent nearly one-quarter of all children in the U.S.  Having accurate information about the challenges Latino children face is essential to ensuring that they become strong, productive citizens who are prepared to succeed in a global economy.  NCLR’s “Latino Kids Data Explorer” offers users the mechanism to provide these facts to voters in an easily accessible format.  

    Between 730,000 and one million Latino citizen children will turn 18 annually between 2010 and 2028, adding over 15.5 million potential voters to the American electorate.  Will they be ready to lead?  Join us for this telephonic briefing and learn more about the children who will shape America’s future. 

    Child research and policy experts at this briefing will explain trends and main findings from the “Latino Kids Data Explorer” and connect these to NCLR’s policy recommendations.  To RSVP, please contact Kathy Mimberg at kmimberg@nclr.org or (202) 776-1714.


    MEDIA ADVISORY

    WHO:    Clarissa Martínez-De-Castro, Director, Civic Engagement and Immigration, NCLR
                   Patricia Foxen, Deputy Director, Research, NCLR
                   Liany Elba Arroyo, Associate Director, Education and Children’s Policy Project, NCLR
                   Helene Stebbins, Senior Policy Director, Birth to Five Policy Alliance
           
    WHAT:    Telephonic press briefing to introduce a new resource on Latino child well-being and address policy recommendations to improve their opportunities

    WHEN:     Thursday, October 25, 2012
                      1 p.m. EDT

    HOW:        Dial 1-866-952-7524
                      Conference ID:  CHILDREN

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans.  For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Joseph Rendeiro
    jrendeiro@nclr.org
    (202) 776-1566

    IN RUN-UP TO ELECTION, POLICY EXPERTS DISCUSS WHY LATINOS NEED BETTER JOB CREATION POLICIES

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—Heading into the 2012 presidential election, job creation is among the chief concerns for Latino voters. Latino unemployment remains markedly high, while those who find jobs are often relegated to the low-wage sector, leaving many wondering whether job creation policies are doing enough to help the rapidly growing Hispanic community find work.

    NCLR (National Council of La Raza) invites reporters to join a discussion about whether job growth in the South Atlantic region has benefitted Hispanics and what policies need to be pursued in order to strengthen the Latino workforce. The briefing coincides with the release of “Now Hiring? Latinos and the Job Creation Policies in the South Atlantic,” an NCLR report which specifically analyzes job creation policies in Delaware, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. Experts will cover subjects such as barriers faced by adult Latino workers with limited education and English language proficiency, the need for investments in workforce development and small business development in the region.

    To RSVP for the telephonic press briefing, email Joseph Rendeiro at jrendeiro@nclr.org or call (202) 776-1566.

    MEDIA ADVISORY

    WHO:   Eric Rodriguez, Vice President, Office of Research, Advocacy and Legislation, NCLR
                Alicia Criado, Policy Associate, Economic and Employment Project, NCLR
                Margie McHugh, Co-Director, National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy, Migration Policy Institute
                Maria Pinzon, Executive Director, Hispanic Services Council
                Chris Brown, Director of Legislative Affairs, PolicyLink

    WHAT: Telephonic Press Briefing: “Now Hiring? Latinos and the Job Creation Policies in the South Atlantic”

    WHEN: Tuesday, October 23, 2012, 1 p.m. EDT

    HOW:   Call: (866) 952-1907
                 Conference Title: Latinos and Job Creation
                 Conference ID: WORKFORCE

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    PARA DIFUSIÓN INMEDIATA           Contacto:
    22 de octubre de 2012                    Kathy Mimberg
                                                                 (202) 776-1714
                                                                 kmimberg@nclr.org


    Nuevo recurso proporciona datos a nivel estatal sobre el bienestar de los niños hispanos, permitiendo que los votantes y los defensores de los niños evalúen mejor las prioridades de los candidatos presidenciales

    WASHINGTON, DC – El Consejo Nacional de La Raza (NCLR, por sus siglas en inglés) llevará a cabo una conferencia de prensa telefónica el jueves 25 de octubre para presentar una base de datos que ayudará a que los defensores de los niños, los políticos, los educadores y los periodistas determinen con facilidad el bienestar de los niños hispanos a nivel nacional y estatal. El "Latino Kids Data Explorer" (Explorador de Datos sobre Niños Hispanos) proporciona valores numéricos sobre 28 factores, tales como educación materna, matrícula preescolar, embarazo de adolescentes, graduación de la escuela secundaria y tasas de seguros de salud y, a la vez, permite a que los usuarios analicen las tendencias y prioricen las áreas de mejora. NCLR ha desarrollado la base de datos con la financiación de Birth to Five Policy Alliance utilizando información generada por Population Reference Bureau y Child Trends. La base de datos estará disponible al público sin costo alguno.

    Casi el 93 por ciento de los niños hispanos en los EE.UU. son ciudadanos. Un tercio de ellos vive en la pobreza y sólo el 63 por ciento se gradúan de la escuela secundaria. Teniendo en cuenta estas estadísticas, el impacto de las políticas de los candidatos presidenciales de 2012 sobre la economía y la educación  – las dos principales prioridades de los hispanos en este ciclo electoral – repercutirá drásticamente sobre estos 17,5 millones de niños, que representan casi una cuarta parte de todos los niños de EE.UU. Es fundamental tener información precisa acerca de los desafíos que enfrentan los niños hispanos para asegurar de que ellos en el futuro se conviertan en ciudadanos fuertes y productivos y que, además, estén preparados para tener éxito en una economía global. En un formato accesible, el “Latino Kids Data Explorer” de NCLR ofrece a los usuarios el mecanismo que pone en conocimiento de los votantes estos factores.

    Entre 730.000 y un millón de niños estadounidenses de origen hispano cumplirán 18 años de edad cada año entre 2010 y 2028, añadiendo más de 15,5 millones de potenciales votantes al electorado estadounidense. ¿Estarán ellos listos para liderar? Únase a nosotros en esta sesión informativa telefónica e infórmese más acerca de los niños que le darán forma al futuro de los Estados Unidos de América.

    Durante esta reunión, expertos en investigación y en políticas para la infancia explicarán las tendencias y las principales conclusiones del "Latino Kids Data Explorer” y las relacionarán con las recomendaciones de las políticas de NCLR. Para confirmar su asistencia, por favor póngase en contacto con Kathy Mimberg en kmimberg@nclr.org o al teléfono: (202)776-1714.

    AVISO A LA PRENSA

    QUIÉNES:    Clarissa Martínez-De-Castro, Directora de Participación Ciudadana e Inmigración, NCLR
                          Patricia Foxen, Directora Adjunta de Investigación, NCLR
                          Liany Elba Arroyo, Directora Asociada del Proyecto de Educación y Políticas para la Infancia, NCLR
                          Helene Stebbins, Directora Principal de Políticas, Birth to Five Policy  Alliance
           
    QUÉ:            Conferencia de prensa telefónica para presentar un nuevo recurso sobre el bienestar de los niños hispanos y tratar las recomendaciones sobre políticas que apuntan a mejorar sus oportunidades 

    CUÁNDO:    Jueves, 25 de octubre de 2012
                          1 p.m. EDT

    CÓMO:        Marque 1-866-952-7524
                         Conferencia ID: CHILDREN

    NCLR—la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles  en los Estados Unidos—trabaja para mejorar las oportunidades de los hispanoamericanos. Para obtener más información sobre el NCLR, visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org


    WASHINGTON, D.C.—A new report released today by NCLR, “Now Hiring? Latinos and the Job Creation Policies in the South Atlantic,” analyzes how state policies aimed at creating jobs in Delaware, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida have failed to produce significant employment gains for the region’s Hispanic workforce. Experts from the Migration Policy Institute, PolicyLink and the Hispanic Services Council of Tampa, Florida, joined NCLR on a telephonic press briefing to discuss policy solutions to maximize the potential of Latino workers and businesses.

    “This research calls for significant policy adjustment at the state level to ensure that jobs in the fastest-growing industries are available to the fastest-growing segment of the South Atlantic workforce: Latinos,” said Alicia Criado, NCLR Policy Associate, Economic and Employment Policy Project, and author of the report. “Especially in this time of limited resources, policymakers must closely monitor the employment situation in their state and respond with customized solutions to meet the unique needs of the Latino workforce and business community.”

    NCLR’s report found the following:

    • Most Hispanic workers in the South Atlantic require additional education and skills training in order to meet the needs of employers.
    • Significant public resources are spent on recruiting businesses to states that fail to invest adequately in adult education and job training programs.
    • Hispanic-owned businesses lack the necessary technical support and training to ensure sustainability and expansion.
    • The region’s wave of anti-immigrant legislation has hampered economic recovery.

    NCLR’s research was based on an analysis of demographic data from the U.S. Census Bureau and interviews with 35 stakeholders, from government officials to service providers. NCLR also convened local leaders from the public, private and nonprofit sectors in Orlando in September to discuss the implications of the research for the region.

    “Latinos must have a seat at the table to inform the job creation agenda at the state level. The South Atlantic economy simply won’t work without Latinos,” concluded Criado.

    Download the full report to learn more about the effect of job creation policies on Hispanic workers.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Kathy Mimberg
    (202) 776-1714
    kmimberg@nclr.org


    Hispanic children represent nearly 15.8 million potential new voters added to the U.S. electorate by 2028 and a significant portion of our future workforce

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—According to a briefing held today by NCLR, the slight gains made over the last decade by Latino children—who represent nearly one in four U.S. children and a large portion of this country’s future workers, taxpayers and voters—will erode without a greater investment of effort and resources to prepare them to succeed in a global economy. To support this claim, NCLR unveiled its “Latino Kids Data Explorer,” which provides policymakers, child advocates and other stakeholders with quick access to data produced by the Population Reference Bureau and Child Trends on 27 factors of child well-being. These indicators include measurements of education, health and economic status at the national and state levels, allowing users to create tables and compare data between states, peer groups and time periods. The online resource, developed with funding from the Birth to Five Policy Alliance, and the accompanying infographic are available for free to the public.

    “One of the most alarming trends in the data we reviewed is the growing number of Latino children living in poverty. Given the disproportionate impact of the recession on Latino workers and the fact that poverty can often carry over from one generation to another, it is increasingly important that we help low-income Latino families and give future generations the opportunity for a better life. It is encouraging to see that more Hispanic children attend preschool today and can be enrolled in health insurance programs, but we are not doing enough to improve on this progress,” said Patricia Foxen, Deputy Director of Research at NCLR.

    The “Latino Kids Data Explorer” provides state-by-state information on how Latino children are faring in terms of poverty, teen pregnancy, maternal education, access to health insurance, high school graduation rates and more, allowing comparisons between states and revealing how these children’s ability to succeed as productive members of society is influenced by these factors. For example, one-third of all Latino children in the U.S. live in poverty, and that number is rising. In 2010, Latino children made up 35 percent of all children living in poverty, compared to 28.4 percent in 1999.

    These are alarming statistics considering that the number of Latinos under age 18 in the U.S. grew by 40 percent from 2000 to 2011, increasing from 12.4 million to 17.5 million; 93 percent of them are U.S. citizens. By contrast, the growth rate for White and Black children during the same period decreased by 11 percent and 4 percent respectively.

    Yet not all trends are negative; 370,000 more Latino children attended preschool in 2010 than in 2000, a strong predictor of future academic achievement, and the number of Hispanic children not attending preschool dropped from 52 percent in 2000 to 46.6 percent in 2010. However, according to NCLR experts, this gain is threatened by growing poverty and the current budget climate. A separate fact sheet, Building a Brighter Future: Latino Children—Ready to Learn and Lead?, outlines the challenges that Latino children face from birth to age eight and emphasizes the importance of early childhood education programs.

    “All children deserve a good education, quality health care, safe neighborhoods, families that can provide for them and nurturing communities. Preschool is at the top of the list of programs that can help Latino children. Studies show that children who attend high-quality preschool do better in school overall, are more likely to graduate from high school, are less likely to be arrested and earn more income over their lifetime than their peers who do not attend preschool,” said Liany Elba Arroyo, Associate Director, Education and Children’s Policy Project, at NCLR.

    NCLR highlighted in Latinos Turning 18 the enormous number of future potential voters that this group represents. Between 740,000 and one million Latino citizen children will turn 18 each year between 2010 and 2028, adding nearly 15.8 million potential voters to the American electorate. Clarissa Martínez-De-Castro, Director of Civic Engagement and Immigration at NCLR, pointed out that when Latino voters go to the polls on November 6, they want to support candidates at all levels of government who advance policies that ensure children are healthy, safe, educated and prepared to contribute to a strong economy.

    “By 2018, Hispanics will make up 18 percent of our country’s workforce. The contributions that Latino children will make to our nation and economy as adults largely depend on decisions made by today’s leaders. We all want America to thrive, and that is not going to happen unless we vote for leaders who recognize that we must invest in the next generation now,” said Martínez-De-Castro.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    PARA DIFUSIÓN IMMEDIATA

    Contacto:
    Kathy Mimberg
    (202) 776-1714
    kmimberg@nclr.org

    En el 2028, los niños hispanos representan casi 15,8 millones de nuevos posibles votantes que se añadirán al electorado de EE.UU. y además ellos serán una significativa parte de nuestra fuerza laboral

    WASHINGTON, DC—Hoy el Consejo Nacional de La Raza (NCLR, por sus siglas en inglés) realizó una sesión informativa donde se señaló que las escasas ganancias de los niños hispanos –que representan casi uno de cada cuatro niños estadounidenses y que gran parte de ellos son los futuros trabajadores, contribuyentes y votantes en este país– se deteriorarían si no se hace una mayor inversión en esfuerzos y recursos para prepararlos para éxito en una economía global. Para apoyar esta afirmación, NCLR presentó su "Latino Kids Data Explorer", que proporciona a los políticos, defensores de los niños y otras partes interesadas acceso rápido a los datos generados por Population Reference Bureau y Child Trends sobre 27 factores referentes al bienestar infantil. Estos datos incluyen, a nivel estatal y nacional, medidas del nivel de educación y del estatus económico y de la salud de los niños, permitiendo a los usuarios del explorador a crear tablas y comparar datos entre los estados, grupos étnicos y raciales y períodos de tiempo. El recurso en línea, desarrollado con fondos de Birth to Five Policy Alliance, y la infografía que lo acompaña estarán disponibles gratis al public. 

    "Una de las tendencias más alarmantes en los datos que revisamos revela el creciente número de niños hispanos que viven en la pobreza. Dado el impacto desproporcionado de la recesión económica que afecta a los trabajadores hispanos y el hecho de que la pobreza se transfiere entre generaciones, es cada día más importante ayudar a las familias hispanas de bajos ingresos y ofrecer a las generaciones futuras la oportunidad de tener una vida mejor. Es alentador ver que hoy hay un mayor número de niños hispanos asistiendo a la escuela preescolar y inscrito en programas de seguro de salud. Sin embargo, no estamos haciendo lo suficiente para mejorar este progreso", dijo Patricia Foxen, Directora Adjunta de Investigación del NCLR.

    El "Latino Kids Data Explorer" provee información de cada estado sobre el estatus de los niños hispanos en términos de pobreza, embarazo de adolescentes, educación materna, acceso a seguros de salud, índices de graduación de la escuela secundaria y otros datos. Esa información permite a los usuarios del explorador a hacer tablas comparativas entre los estados y revelar la capacidad de estos niños para convertirse exitosamente en miembros productivos de la sociedad estadounidense que está influenciada por estos factores. Por ejemplo, en los EE.UU. un tercio de todos los niños hispanos viven en la pobreza, y esa cifra sigue aumentando. En el año 2010, los niños hispanos constituyeron el 35 por ciento de todos los niños que viven en la pobreza, en comparación con un 28,4 por ciento en 1999.

    Estas estadísticas son alarmantes teniendo en cuenta que el número de hispanos menores de 18 años en los EE.UU. creció en un 40 por ciento entre 2000 y 2011, aumentando de 12,4 millones a 17,5 millones, con el 93 por ciento de esos niños ciudadanos estadounidenses. Por el contrario, la tasa de crecimiento de los niños blancos y negros durante ese mismo período disminuyó en un 11 por ciento y 4 por ciento, respectivamente.

    Pero no todas las tendencias son negativas puesto que 370.000 niños hispanos más asistieron a la escuela preescolar en 2010 que en 2000, un fuerte indicador de exito académico en el futuro. El porcentaje de niños hispanos que no asistieron a la escuela preescolar bajo del 52 por ciento en 2000 al 46,6 por ciento en 2010. Sin embargo, según los expertos del NCLR, este aumento se ve amenazado por el nivel creciente de pobreza y el clima económico actual. La hoja informativa Building a Brighter Future: Latino Children-Ready to Learn and Lead? detalla los retos que enfrentan los niños latinos desde su nacimiento hasta los ocho años de edad y enfatiza la importancia de la educación preescolar.

    "Todos los niños merecen tener una buena educación, cuidado de la salud de calidad, vecindarios seguros, familias que pueden proveer para su futuro y comunidades que los protejan. La educación preescolar figura en el primer lugar en la lista de los programas que pueden ayudar a los niños hispanos. Los estudios demuestran que los niños que asisten a la escuela preescolar donde se brinda enseñanza de alta calidad les va mejor en términos generales en la escuela, tienen más probabilidades de graduarse de la escuela secundaria, menos probabilidades de ser arrestados y ganan más durante su vida en comparación con niños que no tuvieron educación preescolar", dijo Liany Elba Arroyo, Directora Asociada del Proyecto de Educación y Políticas para la Infancia, a NCLR.

    NCLR reveló en Latinos Turning 18 la importancia del enorme número de futuros posibles votantes que este grupo representa. Entre 740.000 y un millón de niños -- ciudadanos estadounidenses de origen hispano --cumplen anualmente 18 años entre 2010 y 2028. Este hecho agrega casi 15,8 millones de potenciales votantes al electorado de EE.UU. Clarissa Martínez De Castro, Directora de Participación Ciudadana e Inmigración de NCLR, señaló que cuando los votantes hispanos acudan a las urnas el 6 de noviembre querrán apoyar a los candidatos a posiciones de todos los niveles gubernamentales que favorezcan políticas que garanticen la salud, la seguridad y la educación de los niños y que, a la vez, estén dispuestos a contribuir a una economía fuerte.

    "Para 2018, los hispanos constituirán el 18 por ciento de la fuerza laboral de nuestro país. Las contribuciones que los niños hispanos aporten a nuestra nación y a la economía durante su edad adulta, en gran medida, dependerá de las decisiones tomadas por los líderes de hoy en día. Todos queremos que el EE.UU. crezca y eso no va a suceder a menos que votemos por líderes que reconozcan que es hoy cuando se debe invertir en la próxima generación", dijo Martínez-De-Castro.

    NCLR—la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles en los Estados Unidos—trabaja para mejorar las oportunidades de los hispanoamericanos. Para obtener más información sobre el NCLR, visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

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    By Liany Elba Arroyo, Associate Director, Education and Children’s Policy Project 

    Yesterday, NCLR released the Latino Kids Data Explorer, a unique resource that combines information from several sources into one easy-to-use tool. Advocates, policymakers, and even parents can use this database to see how Latino and other children in their state are faring according to 27 different measures of well-being. The data make one thing clear: we have to pursue stronger policies that create opportunities for children and their families. While Latino children have made gains in several areas such as health insurance coverage and preschool attendance, the reality is that Latino children, as well as Black children, lag far behind their White counterparts in almost all measures of child well-being. This should be of great concern to us all given that Latino children, as one of the fastest-growing child populations in the country, will not only make up our future workforce but also pay the taxes that sustain our nation. If our political leaders shortchange this crucial population during the upcoming conversations on the national debt, they will end up pushing our children off a “fiscal cliff” from which they may never recover. 

    Last year, policymakers in Washington agreed on a deal to extend tax cuts until December 31, 2012. They also scheduled massive budget cuts to take place concurrently. On January 1, 2013, Americans will be hit with cuts to vital programs in education, health, housing, and job training, as well as a tax hike, unless Congress takes action. This “fiscal cliff” would cause serious harm to families and could slow down or even reverse economic growth, potentially increasing unemployment while simultaneously gutting programs intended to help struggling families. Hispanics must pay close attention to how Congress addresses this issue because the wrong approach can cause long-term damage to our community.

    Latino children, and all poor children, will face a double hit if Congress makes draconian cuts to the programs that so many of them depend on to survive. The first hit comes in the form of decreased access to our nation’s safety net and the education they need to become productive members of society. Our nation runs the risk of backtracking on the progress that Latinos have made over the last decade in graduating from high school, obtaining health insurance, and attending preschool. The number of Latino children living with mothers who have less than a high school education or live in poverty will likely rise.

    The second hit—cuts to entitlements—will not affect the current generation, but it will have an unquestionably disproportionate effect on these same children down the road. Hispanic children will enter adulthood to find our safety net in tatters. Cuts to Social Security and Medicare will be acutely felt by a poorer and potentially less healthy generation.

    As a Latina, voter, and mother, I ask myself how that is fair. How can our leaders pass the burden on to today’s children? Why would our nation’s leaders condemn young Latinos to a childhood of neglect and an adulthood of suffering? Why would they kill the American Dream for nearly one-quarter of our nation’s children? These are questions that all Latinos, and all Americans, must ask themselves. Then we must resolve to make a difference. Our community must inform itself and act to ensure that our nation’s leaders get the message: our community will not let them damn our children to a lifetime of poverty.


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    By Janis Bowdler, Director, Wealth-Building Policy Project

    How do you convince somebody to fix a problem when they are seemingly blind to the overwhelming evidence that the problem even exists? Today, 11 million Americans owe more on their mortgage than their home is worth. Analysts predict that we will see an estimated two million foreclosure filings this year with millions more at risk of losing their homes. As a result, hundreds of thousands of senior citizens are losing their economic security, children and families are being uprooted, and neighborhoods are blighted with vacant properties.

    The nation’s housing market is in a precarious position, and despite millions of homeowners across the nation bearing the brunt of the housing crisis, too few of the decision-makers on Capitol Hill are championing the necessary solutions to protect the American Dream of homeownership. And in the midst of a presidential election, the onus falls on the two candidates to carve out serious proposals to navigate homeowners out of this colossal mess. But when political strategy dictates that its best for both candidates to avoid the issue altogether, it becomes incredibly challenging to push for the type of national conversation we need.

    Recently the Home for Good campaign—a collaboration of more than 70 civil rights, community, and public interest groups—reached out to homeowners across the country for help. In the end, nearly 40,000 people signed on to our call, asking the presidential candidates to offer real solutions to:

    • Stop needless foreclosures
    • Expand affordable rental housing
    • Revive a sustainable path to homeownership

    Along with signatures of tens of thousands of concerned voters and advocates, we have offered a blueprint for restoring home opportunity called the Compact for Home Opportunity. We have made it especially easy for them. The Presidential candidates have our signatures and a plan, now the ball is in their court.

    It’s important for both candidates to remember that while they may choose to skirt the issue until Election Day, there will be no hiding from the housing crisis over the next four years. Housing has traditionally led previous recession rebounds, so it is no wonder that our economic recovery has dragged alongside a weak housing market. We must address the crushing mortgage debt overhang, keep families in their homes, and bring new homeowners into the market.

    Important housing policy questions are looming. Will the candidates lean on Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to stop dual tracking, a practice that moves families through foreclosure before they know if they could qualify for a loan modification? Will they give away resources for housing counseling and low-income renters in the pending “Grand Bargain?” It’s these kinds of details that have been completely absent from both candidates’ platforms.

    The financial crisis has decimated neighborhoods, wiped out family wealth, and ruined financial futures, but it has not changed the central role the home plays in our lives. We continue to seek shelter with a few basic amenities—safe streets, good schools, and access to quality jobs. It is time that candidates speak frankly with voters and explain what they plan to do to ensure that families who dream of owning a home can make that dream a reality.
     


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  • 08/10/12--07:54: Remembering Lupe
  • (This was first posted to the ALMA Awards 411 Blog.)

    This was a tough bit of news for us to take in: the passing of Lupe Ontiveros, an award-winning actress with more than 150 films and TV shows to her credit and a longtime community activist. On July 26, Lupe passed away at the age of 69 after a brief battle with liver cancer.

    Lupe worked tirelessly in film and television, paving the way for many Latinas to carve out their own path in Hollywood. One of our favorite memories of Lupe was her winning the “Outstanding Actress in a Comedy Series” ALMA Award in 1998 for her work in the show “Veronica’s Closet.” You can see her below with the award.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


    Lupe Ontiveros at the 1998 ALMA Awards

    As fans, friends, and family members continue to mourn the loss of such a dynamic role model, actress, and icon, NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía had the following words to offer on the news of Lupe’s passing:

    “The Latino community has lost one of its most talented members and one of its fiercest champions. Lupe was one of the most recognized Latinas in film and television, with an acclaimed career spanning nearly 40 years. From sitcoms to TV dramas, Oscar-winning movies to independent film, from the Broadway stage to Latino theater, Lupe did it all and made her mark on every production she was in.

    “If there was a call for a Latina ‘mamá’ or ‘abuela,’ you could bet that Lupe would be playing the part. But she was also a ‘mamá’ to hundreds of Latino and Latina actors whom she mentored and helped shepherd through the complicated maze of the film and television industry. We are especially proud and grateful that she was a strong supporter of the NCLR ALMA Awards® from the very beginning. Her blessing helped make the show the place to be for Latino talent in Hollywood.

    “She was a tireless advocate for the Latino community, whether it was improving the image of Latinos in the media or helping those suffering from HIV/AIDS. We will miss her dearly, and our deepest condolences go out to her family, friends, colleagues, and fans,” concluded Murguía.

    If you’d like to share your own reflections, please feel free to do so. Our thoughts continue to be with Lupe’s family and friends as they cope with this untimely loss.


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    Luck is in the air in San Francisco this week. Not only did the Giants sweep the World Series earlier this week, but NCLR (National Council of La Raza) received an award from the American Public Health Association (APHA) for a cervical cancer prevention program we developed. Thousands of public health professionals are in the Bay area for the week attending the 140th APHA Annual Meeting & Expo, the largest gathering of public health professionals in the world with a focus on current and emerging health science, policy, and practice issues in an effort to prevent disease and promote health.

    With funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, NCLR created a program, titled “Mujer Sana, Familia Fuerte” (Strong woman, Strong Family), that is a culturally competent and linguistically appropriate education program for Latinas about the importance of engaging in early cancer screenings. With rates of cervical cancer affecting Latinas disproportionately high, we’ve seen an urgent need for culturally competent and linguistically appropriate health educational materials that address cervical cancer among Latinas in an innovative and creative way. The program provides promotores de salud (lay health educators) with training and a bilingual tool kit for educational sessions within Hispanic neighborhoods in Chicago and Washington, D.C. At NCLR, we are doing all that we can to ensure that health materials are providing messages that are effective with the Latino community to make a long-term impact.

    The award-winning program was selected from a competitive pool for demonstrating innovation in materials targeting a specific population. Focus groups helped determine the best approach and terminology for increasing knowledge and changing behavior related to cancer screening in a way that would resonate with Latinos. The bilingual tool kit—which includes a flip chart and handouts on local resources—is designed for promotores to use during one-hour charlas (health education sessions) in their communities.

    NCLR is thrilled to have received this award from APHA. Given that the cervical cancer rates among Hispanics are nearly twice that of non-Hispanic Whites, this award highlights how important it is for public health programs to take cultural issues into consideration, work with community leaders, and use bilingual materials. We look forward continuing our efforts to address the health needs of our community.

    Manuela McDonough, Program Manager for the Institute of Hispanic Health at NCLR


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    Luck is in the air in San Francisco this week. Not only did the Giants sweep the World Series earlier this week, but NCLR (National Council of La Raza) received an award from the American Public Health Association (APHA) for a cervical cancer prevention program we developed. Thousands of public health professionals are in the Bay area for the week attending the 140th APHA Annual Meeting & Expo, the largest gathering of public health professionals in the world with a focus on current and emerging health science, policy, and practice issues in an effort to prevent disease and promote health.

    With funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, NCLR created a program, titled “Mujer Sana, Familia Fuerte” (Strong woman, Strong Family), that is a culturally competent and linguistically appropriate education program for Latinas about the importance of engaging in early cancer screenings. With rates of cervical cancer affecting Latinas disproportionately high, we’ve seen an urgent need for culturally competent and linguistically appropriate health educational materials that address cervical cancer among Latinas in an innovative and creative way. The program provides promotores de salud (lay health educators) with training and a bilingual tool kit for educational sessions within Hispanic neighborhoods in Chicago and Washington, D.C. At NCLR, we are doing all that we can to ensure that health materials are providing messages that are effective with the Latino community to make a long-term impact.

    The award-winning program was selected from a competitive pool for demonstrating innovation in materials targeting a specific population. Focus groups helped determine the best approach and terminology for increasing knowledge and changing behavior related to cancer screening in a way that would resonate with Latinos. The bilingual tool kit—which includes a flip chart and handouts on local resources—is designed for promotores to use during one-hour charlas (health education sessions) in their communities.

    NCLR is thrilled to have received this award from APHA. Given that the cervical cancer rates among Hispanics are nearly twice that of non-Hispanic Whites, this award highlights how important it is for public health programs to take cultural issues into consideration, work with community leaders, and use bilingual materials. We look forward continuing our efforts to address the health needs of our community.

    Manuela McDonough, Program Manager for the Institute of Hispanic Health at NCLR


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE   

    Contact:
    Julian Teixeira
    (202) 776-1812

    “Pledge to Vote” sweepstakes winners have a chance to win tickets to THE X FACTOR finale!

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—Today, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) is pleased to announce a partnership with FOX Audience Strategy, which includes a joint promotion with the FOX broadcast musical talent show THE X FACTOR.  The “Your Vote Always Counts” sweepstakes is a partnership between NCLR and FOX Audience Strategy that will help leverage the show’s core voting element to galvanize the Hispanic community into pledging to vote in the upcoming presidential election.  Participants who pledge to vote in November can enter to win the “Your Vote Always Counts” grand prize package provided by FOX and THE X FACTOR.  The lucky winner will receive two tickets to finale of THE X FACTOR in Los Angeles, California in December 2012 along with airfare, hotel accommodations and a $250 gift card.

    “The ‘Your Vote Always Counts’ sweepstakes is a highly creative and unique way to encourage us all to make a most important pledge—to vote on Election Day, November 6, when it really counts for our families, our community and our country,” said NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía.  “We are deeply grateful that FOX Audience Strategy is partnering with us on this critically important effort to urge all Americans, including Latinos, to vote.  THE X FACTOR is one of the most exciting shows on television showcasing the limitless talent in America, many of whom are up-and-coming Latino stars.  THE X FACTOR has incredible reach and an audience of millions, and we are very excited to inform and educate this vast audience about the importance of voting this November.” 

    Audiences can begin voting for their favorite contestants on THE X FACTOR beginning November 7.

    “The sweepstakes is a fun way to highlight an important and critical issue and we are thrilled to partner with NCLR and the NCLR community to further awareness,” said Nicole A. Bernard, Senior Vice President, FOX Audience Strategy.  “We look forward to building a broader partnership with NCLR that will further a joint commitment to engage the Latino community by highlighting core community values through FOX programming and otherwise.” 

    NCLR has sustained a multiplatform campaign to get Latinos to the polls this November.  In March NCLR launched its Mobilize to Vote (M2V) campaign, which supported full-time voter registration operations in Florida, Pennsylvania, Nevada and Colorado and partnered with NCLR Affiliates to register voters in California, North Carolina and Texas, among other states.  Those efforts, along with an online voter registration campaign, have yielded over 90,000 new Latino voters.  Just two weeks ago, NCLR launched its Get Out the Vote field campaign with canvassers knocking on the doors of potential voters, urging them to have a plan in place for Election Day.  

    Using online and mobile platforms, NCLR plans to reach an additional 140,000 potential voters via email and text messages to help them find their polling locations, remind them to vote early where possible, and keep them informed of their rights on Election Day.  To participate, users can sign up by texting POWER to 62571.  The Latino vote is poised to play a pivotal role in election outcomes across the nation, and turnout is key to demonstrating just how much of an impact the Hispanic electorate will have.  NCLR’s aggressive campaign aims to increase electoral participation and encourage the long-term engagement of Latinos in the process. 

    No purchase necessary to enter or win the THE X FACTOR® "Your Vote Always Counts" Sweepstakes.  Open to legal residents of the 48 contiguous U.S. states & D.C., 18 and older.  Other restrictions apply.  Sweepstakes begins on 10/26/12 at 3pm ET and ends on 11/7/2012 at 12 p.m. ET.  Void in AK, HI & where prohibited.  Subject to Official Rules available at http://foxaudiencestrategy-txfsweeps.com/rules/rules.  Sponsor: Fox Broadcasting Company.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans.  For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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  • 08/10/12--14:22: The Week in Social Media
  • It's been a while since we posted our top social media posts of the week, so here you are! Our favorite posts, videos, pictures and updates from the past week.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Julian Teixeira
    (202) 776-1812
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    Washington, D.C. —Today, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) commended AT&T for its leadership on a critical issue that acutely affects the Latino community: texting and driving. Through a monetary pledge to the “It Can Wait Campaign,” and the announcement of their “No text on Board - Pledge Day,” AT&T will help draw awareness to texting and driving, particularly with regard to teen drivers. 

    “With over 100,000 crashes caused by texting each year, this issue has reached alarming proportions in our country and in our community,” said NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía. “Hispanic teens are far more likely to text while driving, and we hope that AT&T’s renewed focus on the issue will help save lives.”

    According to a recent study undertaken by AT&T on texting behavior among teen drivers, 54% of Hispanic teens admitted to texting while driving, compared to 41% of Whites and 42% of Black teenagers. Seventy percent of Hispanic teens admitted to texting while stopped at a light, compared to 58% of Whites and 61% of Black teenagers. Eighty-five percent of Hispanic teens reported that their parents text “all the time.” In addition, only 70% of Hispanic teens say they have a rule in their house against texting while driving, compared to 82% of Whites and 73% of Blacks.

    NCLR calls on the Latino community to sign the pledge and join the movement at www.itcanwait.com.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:     

    Contact: 
    Julian Teixeira
    jteixeira@nclr.org
     
    (202) 776-1812

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—For more than a year, NCLR and others have said that the Hispanic vote would be the one to watch in the 2012 election.  This was resoundingly confirmed by the results of last night’s election.  According to an election eve poll conducted by ImpreMedia/Latino Decisions, the level of support for President Barack Obama among Latino voters was at near-historic levels.  With significant Latino presence in states such as Florida, Virginia, Colorado, and Nevada, among others, there is no question that the Hispanic vote contributed mightily to the president’s razor-thin margin of victory in each of those states.

    “We are very proud of our community tonight,” said Janet Murguía, NCLR President and CEO.  “Latino voters came out in large numbers—perhaps surpassing 10 percent of the electorate for the first time in history according to CNN exit polls—because they care deeply about the future of this country.  They want to see our economy and opportunity expand, and the American Dream available for all.  And they clearly want to see the immigration issue resolved.”
    “In one of the closest presidential elections in years, the battle for the Latino vote was no contest at all.  There is no doubt from our own poll results that the president’s positions on the issues, and in particular his landmark decision this summer to grant deferred action to DREAM Act students, more closely mirrored the Latino electorate and were among the key reasons for the president’s historic showing among our community.

    “But it is also true that the Republican party and the Romney campaign failed to compete for our vote and they paid the price for it.  Our community was clearly engaged in this election—NCLR, a nonpartisan organization, surpassed our own goal and registered nearly 95,000 new voters.  The community also clearly recognized that there was no Latino-focused Republican strategy and even more damaging, they were fully aware that candidate Romney has embraced ‘self-deportation’ as an immigration strategy, touted Kris Kobach as his immigration guru, and at one point promised to veto the DREAM Act.

    “In their post-mortem of the election, the Republican party needs to do some soul searching when it comes to the Latino community.  NCLR firmly believes it is in our community’s best interests to have both parties actively and vigorously campaigning for our vote.  And frankly, it is the party’s best interests as well.  As this election demonstrated, in 2012, communities of color, young people, and women are not merely interest groups, they’re the ‘new normal’ demographic of the American electorate.  And with nearly a million Latinos turning 18 every year for the foreseeable future, the Hispanic vote is now a fixture of American politics.

    “We are optimistic that we can and must come together to address our country’s continuing challenges, because this election also revealed much common ground among American voters.  The economy is the overwhelming concern of nearly every voter, and education and health care remain high priorities.  And finally, we agree with the voices in the Republican party who are saying that immigration needs to stop being a negative wedge issue for candidates and that the party should focus instead on a common-sense solution to our broken immigration system.  Latinos are ready to step up and work with Congress and the administration as soon as they reconvene to address these urgent concerns.”

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans.  For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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