Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


older | 1 | .... | 50 | 51 | (Page 52) | 53 | 54 | .... | 79 | newer

    0 0

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Camila Gallardo
    (305)573-7329
    cgallardo@nclr.org

    Law would have created additional obstacles to voting for Latinos and other minorities 

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—Today, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) applauded the Supreme Court’s decision on Gonzalez v. Arizona, a voter ID law that would have required potential eligible voters to prove citizenship in order to register to vote. Tennessee, Kansas, Georgia and Alabama had passed similar laws in the year leading up to the 2012 election. In a 7-2 decision, the Court ruled that Arizona’s law is preempted by the National Voter Registration Act, also known as the Motor Voter Act. Justice Scalia, in the majority opinion, explained that federal law “forbids states to demand an applicant submit additional information beyond that required by the federal form.”

    The Arizona voter ID law would have placed an additional burden on eligible Latino and other minority voters by requiring many of them to register in person, given that photocopying a naturalization document is prohibited by federal law.

    “We applaud the Supreme Court for today’s ruling, which ensures that all eligible potential voters have equitable access to the voting process. Minorities, the young and the elderly would have been disproportionately impacted if the law were allowed to stand. This is precisely why the Motor Voter Act was enacted over two decades ago to prevent such inequities,” said Clarissa Martínez-De-Castro, Director of Immigration and Civic Engagement, NCLR.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

    ###

                                             


    0 0



    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:

    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    In an ill-advised attempt to delegate immigration enforcement to state and local authorities and criminalize aspiring Americans, the House of Representatives Committee on the Judiciary yesterday passed HR 2278, the “Strengthen and Fortify Enforcement Act.” NCLR (National Council of La Raza) is appalled that the House Judiciary Committee would pursue legislation that aims to expand many of the wasteful and misguided interior enforcement policies, such as the failed Arizona SB 1070, that have caused fear and insecurity in communities across the country.

    “At a time when the Senate is debating a commonsense, comprehensive approach to immigration reform that would restore law and order to this system, it is disheartening that a select group of House members would take the opposite approach by giving states the authority to create a chaotic patchwork of immigration laws,” said Janet Murguía, President and CEO of NCLR. “We have clearly seen that laws like Arizona SB 1070 and Alabama HB 56 not only fail to solve our immigration problems, but also inherently threaten the civil rights of Americans by legalizing racial profiling and discrimination. Why would we essentially nationalize these failed laws that fly directly in the face of this country’s core values?”

    “The majority of Americans have made it crystal clear that they want to see immigration reform passed and that they expect Congress to deliver a commonsense solution,” added Murguía. “Instead of looking back to failed policies, we encourage members of the House of Representatives to work toward a solution that promotes economic growth and family unity and reflects our nation’s values.”

    ###


    0 0



    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Julian Teixeira
    (202) 776-1812
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    Today, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) lauded the release of the CBO (Congressional Budget Office) score of the Senate’s immigration reform bill, “The Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act of 2013” (S. 744). The nonpartisan arm of Congress charged with estimating the cost of legislation very clearly outlined that the benefits of passing immigration reform far outweigh the costs related to the bill.

    The score revealed that passing immigration reform would reduce the federal budget deficit by almost $900 billion within 20 years and would grow the economy by 5.4 percent, addressing some of our nation’s most vexing problems when we need it most.

    “We have been saying for years that passing immigration reform would be beneficial to our economy and now the CBO score has confirmed it,” said Janet Murguía, President and CEO, NCLR. “Our economy will grow, the deficit will shrink, jobs will be created and our taxpaying labor force will expand so that we have more workers contributing to our tax system. All of these positives should demonstrate to lawmakers working on reform that we shouldn’t delay passage of an immigration bill which will provide our nation with additional economic benefits.”

    ###
     


    0 0

    PARA DIVULGACIÓN INMEDIATA                                                                                              PARA MÁS INFORMACIÓN:
    20 de junio, 2013                                                                                                                         Ricky Garza
                                                                                                                                                      (202) 776-1732
                                                                                                                                                      rgarza@nclr.org


    SIETE ORGANIZACIONES COMUNITARIAS SE UNEN A LA RED DE AFILIADOS DEL NCLR

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—Siete miembros nuevos se han unido a la Red de Afiliados del NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) de organizaciones locales que trabajan con la comunidad latina en todo el país: American Latino Center for Research, Education & Justice (ALCREJ) en Houston, Tex.; Familias en Acción en Portland, Ore.; FINATA en Philadelphia, Pa.; The Latino Alzheimer’s and Memory Disorders Alliance (LAMDA) en Norridge, Ill.; Northwest Side Housing Center en Chicago, Ill.; ¿Oíste? The Civic Education Initiative in Boston, Mass.; y Valley Initiative for Development Advancement (VIDA) en Weslaco, Tex. Actualmente, el NCLR cuenta con 276 organizaciones como miembros afiliados en todo el país.

    “Estamos en un momento de gran crecimiento para la comunidad latina y las organizaciones afiliadas del NCLR están trabajando en la vanguardia, ayudando a las familias latinas quienes buscan oportunidades en el campo del adiestramiento laboral, la educación, la salud, la vivienda asequible y en otros sectores que los ayudarán a contribuir al futuro de la nación y obtener el éxito. Extendemos un bienvenido caluroso a los nuevos miembros de la Red de Afiliados del NCLR y estamos entusiasmados de trabajar muy de acerca con ellos,” dijo Sonia Pérez, vicepresidenta de iniciativas estratégicas del NCLR.

    Para más información sobre las organizaciones afiliadas del NCLR, visite su página de internet:

    Los afiliados del NCLR incluyen a 276 organizaciones comunitarias que proveen programas y servicios a millones de hispanos estadounidenses. A través de sus esfuerzos, educan a niños y adultos, ayudan a los trabajadores a prepararse para el empleo, enseñan inglés a los inmigrantes, inscriben a nuevos votantes, ayudan a las familias a comprar y conservar sus casas y proporcionan servicios de salud.

    El NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) es la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos y trabaja para mejorar sus oportunidades. Para más información sobre el NCLR, por favor visite http://www.nclr.org/ o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

    ###


    0 0

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                      Contact:
    June 20, 2013                                                                                                            Ricky Garza
                                                                                                                                    (202) 776-1732
                                                                                                                                    rgarza@nclr.org

     

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—Seven new Affiliate members have recently joined the NCLR (National Council of La Raza) Affiliate Network of local organizations that work with the Latino community throughout the nation: American Latino Center for Research, Education & Justice (ALCREJ) in Houston, Texas; Familias en Acción in Portland, Ore.; FINATA in Philadelphia, Pa.; the Latino Alzheimer’s and Memory Disorders Alliance (LAMDA) in Norridge, Ill.; Northwest Side Housing Center in Chicago, Ill.; ¿Oíste? The Civic Education Initiative in Boston, Mass.; and Valley Initiative for Development and Advancement (VIDA) in Weslaco, Texas. With these additions, NCLR now counts 276 organizations across the United States as Affiliate members.

    “This is a time of tremendous growth for the Latino community. The organizations in NCLR’s Affiliate Network are on the front lines, helping Latino families who seek opportunities for job training, education, health care, affordable housing and much more advance in life and contribute to the future of our nation. We extend a warm welcome to these new members of the NCLR Affiliate Network and look forward to working closely with them for years to come,” said Sonia Pérez, NCLR Senior Vice President, Strategic Initiatives.

    For more information about NCLR’s new Affiliate organizations:

    NCLR’s Affiliates include 276 community organizations that provide programs and services to millions of Hispanic Americans. Through their work, they educate children and adults, help workers prepare for jobs, teach immigrants English, register people to vote, provide health services and help families buy and keep their homes.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org, or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

    ###


    0 0

     

     

    PARA DIFUSIÓN INMEDIATA Contacto:
    20 de junio de 2013 Nayda Rivera-Hernández
      (787) 649-9501; nrivera@nclr.org
      Elaine Martinez, Fundación Banco Popular
      (787) 460-3560; elamartinez@bppr.com

     

    NCLR PUBLICA UN LIBRO DE DATOS PARA EXPONER LA SITUACIÓN DE LA NIÑEZ EN PUERTO RICO

    El informe NUESTROS NIÑOS CUENTAN – Puerto Rico Libro de Datos 2012 proporciona una muestra estadística de los 78 municipios


    SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO—El lunes 24 de junio, el NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) publicará los hallazgos de un nuevo estudio sobre la situación de la niñez en los 78 municipios de Puerto Rico en áreas como pobreza, salud y educación. El NCLR analizará los datos del informe NUESTROS NIÑOS CUENTAN – Puerto Rico Libro de Datos 2012 durante la conferencia para organizaciones sin fines de lucro Fomentando Alianzas coordinada por la Fundación Banco Popular. La presentación comenzará a la 1:30 p.m. en el Centro de Desarrollo de Banco Popular, ubicado en el tercer piso de Centro Europa, en la Avenida Juan Ponce De León #1492 en Santurce, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

    El libro de datos documenta medidas claves de bienestar de la niñez y sus perspectivas de futuro a nivel local en Puerto Rico. Durante la presentación, Nayda Rivera-Hernández, Analista Sénior de Investigación del NCLR, examinará los datos más relevantes de los 78 municipios y proveerá un análisis del significado de los números tanto para Puerto Rico como para sus familias.

    El libro, que incluye información demográfica, socioeconómica, sobre la salud y la educación de los niños de la isla, demuestra que mientras los indicadores de salud han mejorado, muchos jóvenes no son capaces de alcanzar su pleno potencial debido a la difícil situación económica que enfrentan sus familias o a su propio comportamiento arriesgado. Se recolectaron datos que describen desde los primeros 18 años de vida, comenzando con las estadísticas de bajo peso al nacer, nacimiento prematuro y mortalidad infantil, abarcando desde la infancia hasta los años escolares, y continuando hasta los últimos años de la adolescencia para considerar problemas como los nacimientos a adolescentes y la ociosidad juvenil. El informe NUESTROS NIÑOS CUENTAN – Puerto Rico Libro de Datos 2012 está diseñado para que las organizaciones, comunidades, ciudadanos y funcionarios del gobierno lo utilicen como un recurso para la investigación, educación, abogacía y creación de políticas.

    QUÉ: Presentación para hacer público el NUESTROS NIÑOS CUENTAN – Puerto Rico Libro de Datos 2012 sobre el bienestar de la niñez en los 78 municipios de Puerto Rico.
       
    CUÁNDO: Lunes, 24 de junio a la 1:30 p.m.
       
    DÓNDE: Centro Europa, Tercer piso
    Avenida Juan Ponce De León #1492
    Santurce, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

    El NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) es la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos y trabaja para mejorar sus oportunidades. Para más información sobre el NCLR, por favor visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

     

    ###


    0 0



    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:

    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    Protecting millions of vulnerable families from losing food assistance, the House of Representatives today voted down the “Federal Agriculture Reform and Risk Management Act of 2013” (H.R. 1947), known as the farm bill, which included provisions that would have cut more than $20 billion from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) over ten years. The House had also added a number of harmful amendments to the bill that would, among other restrictions, eliminate SNAP benefits that are unused after 60 days, allow states to require drug tests for food stamp beneficiaries and prevent certain convicted felons from ever receiving benefits. NCLR (National Council of La Raza) applauds the bipartisan vote to defeat this bill and prevent drastic cuts to a program that helps millions of Latinos overcome poverty and access sufficient food.

    “This bill was not only bad policy, but also downright cruel,” said Janet Murguía, President and CEO of NCLR. “The bill in question would have been perhaps one of the biggest attacks on vulnerable Latino families, children and workers in recent decades. For many Latinos, who have been hit the hardest by the economic downturn, SNAP is a lifeline that they rely on to put food on the table every night, and they cannot afford to lose those critical benefits.”

    Approximately one in six Americans relies on SNAP, and almost 17 percent of those participants are Latino. In fact, Latino children make up almost two-fifths of all children living with hunger in this nation. The proposed cuts would have eliminated access to SNAP for approximately 2.5 million families.

    “No child in this country should have to go to bed hungry,” added Murguía. “We encourage the House leadership to reconsider the misguided approach that they took with this bill and come back to the table with a farm bill that restores the cuts to SNAP and keeps America’s best interests in mind.”

    ###
     


    0 0

              

     

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Contact:
    June 21, 2013 Nayda Rivera-Hernández, NCLR
      (787) 649-9501; nrivera@nclr.org
      Elaine Martinez, Fundación Banco Popular
      (787) 460-3560; elamartinez@bppr.com

     

    "2012 KIDS COUNT – Puerto Rico Data Book” provides statistical snapshot of the 78 municipios


    SAN JUAN, P.R.—On Monday, June 24, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) will release findings from a new publication about how children in Puerto Rico’s 78 municipios are faring in areas such as poverty, health and education.  NCLR will present findings from its “2012 KIDS COUNT – Puerto Rico Data Book” at the Fomentando Alianzas nonprofit conference hosted by Fundación Banco Popular.  The briefing will begin at 1:30 p.m. at the Centro de Desarrollo de Banco Popular, located on the third floor of Centro Europa at 1492 Avenida Juan Ponce De León in Santurce, San Juan, P.R.

    The data book documents key measures of children’s well-being at the local level in Puerto Rico and their prospects for the future.  At the briefing, Nayda Rivera-Hernández, Senior Research Analyst at NCLR, will review highlights of data from the 78 municipios and provide analysis of what these numbers mean for Puerto Rico and its families.

    The book, which includes demographic, health, education and socioeconomic information about children on the island, demonstrates that while health indicators are improving, many youth are unable to fulfill their potential because of their families’ difficult economic situations or their own risky behavior.  The data were collected from the first 18 years of their lives, beginning with low birth weight, premature birth and infant mortality statistics, spanning their infant, toddler and school years and continuing through late adolescence to address issues such as teen births and teen idleness.  The “2012 KIDS COUNT – Puerto Rico Data Book” is designed for use by organizations, communities, citizens and government officials as a resource for research, education, advocacy and policy development.  A copy will be available online at www.nclr.org after the event.

    MEDIA ADVISORY

    WHAT: Press briefing to release the “2012 KIDS COUNT – Puerto Rico Data Book” on the well-being of children in Puerto Rico’s 78 municipios
    WHEN:   Monday, June 24, 1:30 p.m.
    WHERE: Centro Europa, Third Floor
    1492 Avenida Juan Ponce De León
    Santurce, San Juan, Puerto Rico
    WHO: Nayda Rivera-Hernández, Senior Research Analyst, NCLR  

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans.  For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org, or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

    ###
     


    0 0



    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:

    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    Today, the Senate’s bipartisan “Gang of Eight” announced an agreement on a border security amendment that has thus far been a sticking point in negotiations on the passage of S. 744 the “Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act.”

    “We want to acknowledge and thank the members of the bipartisan “Gang of Eight” for their tireless efforts, their statesmanship and their unwavering commitment to a balanced and fair approach to immigration reform. They have bent over backwards to accommodate some of their enforcement-first colleagues, and this compromise represents a huge concession on their part,” said Janet Murguía, President and CEO of NCLR (National Council of La Raza).

    “While we believe that this compromise is unnecessary policywise, it is clearly politically necessary both to ensure a solid bipartisan Senate vote and to send a strong signal to the House that they must act to support a fair and effective bipartisan solution. By agreeing to this deal, the bipartisan group of senators has overcome the bill’s biggest hurdle without undermining the path to legality and citizenship, which is at the heart of the legislation,” added Murguía.

    “Like all hard-fought compromises, this one is painful. It is also excessive since the current bill already has sufficient resources dedicated to improving security. Specifically, by doubling the number of Customs and Border Patrol agents, the amendment will drum up unnecessary costs and raise concerns about civil rights violations for people living in border communities. It is essential that the final bill includes provisions to prevent civil rights abuse and racial profiling and to ensure that Customs and Border Patrol agents are properly trained and held accountable,” continued Murguía.

    “We urge the Senate to move forward as quickly as possible with a vote on final passage,” concluded Murguía.

    ###
     


    0 0

    PARA DIFUSIÓN INMMEDIATA                                                              Para más información:
    24 de junio de 2013                                                                                 Nayda I. Rivera-Hernández
                                                                                                                 (787) 649-9501; nrivera@nclr.org
                                                                                                                

    PANORAMA MIXTO SOBRE EL BIENESTAR DE LA NIÑEZ DE PUERTO RICO EN El LIBRO DE DATOS KIDS COUNT 2013

    Mejoran las tasas de bajo peso al nacer y de asistencia a la escuela preescolar pero Puerto Rico aún mantiene las tasas más altas en EE.UU. de pobreza infantil, desempleo de los padres y participación juvenil en la escuela y la fuerza laboral

    SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico—Las tendencias en educación y salud que aparecen en el Libro de Datos KIDS COUNT 2013, publicado hoy por la Fundación Annie E. Casey, son indicios positivos que muestran una disminución en las tasas de niños sin seguro médico y de nacimientos a adolescentes a nivel nacional. En Puerto Rico, la mejoría en estas áreas también incluye tendencias positivas en las tasas de niños que nacen con bajo peso, en una mayor asistencia a la escuela preescolar y en un mayor número de jefes de hogar graduados de la escuela superior. No obstante, los indicadores económicos de Puerto Rico son inferiores a los de cualquier otra jurisdicción estatal de los EE.UU.: el 84 % de los niños puertorriqueños viven en zonas de alta pobreza, siete veces la tasa a nivel nacional (12 %).

    “El pronóstico económico para los niños y niñas de Puerto Rico continúa siendo preocupante, pero nos alienta ver que en las áreas de salud y educación más niños tienen un buen comienzo en la vida”, dijo Nayda Rivera-Hernández, Analista Sénior de Investigación del NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza por sus siglas en ingles), la organización que administra y maneja el proyecto de Puerto Rico en la red de proyectos KIDS COUNT de la Fundación Annie E. Casey.

    “Estamos orgullosos de que el porciento de asistencia a la escuela preescolar de Puerto Rico se encuentre entre las más altas de EE.UU. y estamos encantados con el descenso en la tasa de niños sin seguro”, continuó Rivera-Hernández. “Pero no podemos perder de vista las circunstancias económicas adversas de sus familias; es alarmante que el 84% de los niños en la isla viven en áreas de alta pobreza y que más de la mitad de nuestros niños viven en familias monoparentales y con padres que no tienen un empleo seguro. Esto tiene un impacto enorme en sus expectativas y en el futuro de la isla”.

    Los datos indican que la población adolescente de Puerto Rico está atrapada en una desolada tierra de nadie, donde una alta proporción de jóvenes se encuentra sin estudiar ni trabajar. Algunos de los hallazgos clave indican que:

    • 16 % de los estudiantes de la escuela superior han abandonado la escuela y están desempleados, el doble de la tasa a nivel nacional (8 %).
    • 40 % no llega a graduarse de escuela superior en cuatro años —un aumento del 33 % informado en el Libro de Datos del año pasado— lo que coloca a Puerto Rico en el último lugar entre las jurisdicciones de EE.UU. en cuanto a la tasa de graduación a tiempo, junto con el Distrito de Columbia y casi el doble de la tasa a nivel nacional (22 %); y
    • la tasa de nacimientos a adolescentes de 51 de cada 1,000 adolescentes mujeres, está muy por arriba de la tasa general de EE.UU.

    A pesar de las circunstancias económicas desconcertantes de los niños de Puerto Rico, existen algunas tendencias positivas. En el Libro de Datos KIDS COUNT 2013 se documentan las mejoras en 3 de los 4 indicadores de salud de Puerto Rico: el porciento de bebés que nacen con bajo peso sigue siendo alto pero disminuyó ligeramente al 12.6 %; el porciento de niños sin seguro médico pasó del 5 al 4 %; y la tasa de mortalidad de niños y adolescentes cayó en los últimos años también. El porciento de niños que no asisten a la escuela preescolar disminuyó del 51 al 47 %.

    “Los niños deben crecer sanos y tener una buena educación si van a ser los ciudadanos, trabajadores y líderes fuertes que nuestro país necesita. Puerto Rico está avanzando en estas áreas y esperamos que estos avances continúen. Sin embargo, la información publicada hoy justifica los esfuerzos para ayudar a las familias a mejorar su seguridad económica e involucrar a los jóvenes y guiarlos en el camino hacia un futuro productivo. Dada la limitación de los recursos disponibles hoy en día, estos datos pueden ayudar a los formuladores de políticas a evaluar dónde invertir los recursos para tener mayor impacto sobre el bienestar de los niños", dijo Rivera-Hernández.

    El Libro de Datos KIDS COUNT presenta los últimos datos sobre el bienestar de la niñez de cada estado, el Distrito de Columbia y el país. Esta información está disponible en el recién rediseñado Centro de Datos de KIDS COUNT, que también contiene los datos más recientes a nivel nacional, estatal y local de cientos de medidas de bienestar de la niñez. Los usuarios del Centro de Datos pueden crear clasificaciones, mapas, y gráficas para utilizarlos en publicaciones y sitios web, y ver información en tiempo real en dispositivos móviles. El NCLR publicará esta semana información local específica de los 78 municipios de Puerto Rico y trabajará para conseguir que los formuladores de políticas y agencias gubernamentales en estas áreas tengan acceso a estas estadísticas.

    Para más información o para coordinar una entrevista sobre el bienestar de la niñez en Puerto Rico, por favor comuníquese con Nayda Rivera-Hernández al (787) 649-9501 o nrivera@nclr.org, o con Kathy Mimberg al (202) 776-1714 o kmimberg@nclr.org. Además, puede encontrar información vía Twitter en las cuentas @NCLR y @nayda4prkids.

    El NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) es la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos y trabaja para mejorar sus oportunidades. Para más información sobre el NCLR, por favor visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

    ###

    La Fundación Annie E. Casey es una institución filantrópica privada y nacional que crea un mejor futuro para los niños del país por medio del fortalecimiento de las familias, el desarrollo de oportunidades económicas y la transformación de los barrios en lugares más seguros y sanos para vivir, trabajar y crecer. Si desea más información, visite http://www.aecf.org. KIDS COUNT® es una marca registrada de la Fundación Annie E. Casey.
     


    0 0

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                           Contact:                  Nayda I. Rivera-Hernández
    June 24, 2013                                                                                                (787) 649-9501; nrivera@nclr.org
                                                                                                                        Kathy Mimberg
                                                                                                                        (202) 776-1714; kmimberg@nclr.org


    Low-birth-weight rates and preschool attendance improve, but Puerto Rico still has highest rates in U.S. of child poverty, parental unemployment and teen participation in school and workforce

    SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico—Education and health trends are bright spots in the 2013 KIDS COUNT Data Book released today by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, which shows welcomed decreases in uninsured children and teen birthrates nationwide. Puerto Rico’s improved outlook in these areas also include positive trends in low-birth-weight rates, stronger preschool attendance, and a larger number of heads of household who have a high school degree. Yet, the economic indicators for Puerto Rico are worse than for any other U.S. jurisdiction: 84 percent of children here live in high-poverty areas, which is seven times the national rate (12 percent).

    “The economic outlook for Puerto Rico’s children continues to be of great concern, but we are encouraged to see that more children are getting a good start in life in terms of health and education,” said Nayda Rivera-Hernández, Senior Research Analyst at NCLR (National Council of La Raza), the Puerto Rico grantee in the foundation’s KIDS COUNT network.

    “We are proud that Puerto Rico’s rate of preschool attendance is among the highest in the U.S. and are thrilled with the drop in uninsured children,” continued Rivera-Hernández. “But we cannot lose sight of the dire financial circumstances of their families; it is astounding to consider that 84 percent of children here live in high-poverty areas and that more than half of our children live in single-parent families and have parents who are not securely employed. This has an enormous impact on their prospects and the island’s future.”

    A snapshot of Puerto Rico’s teen population shows they are stuck in a bleak no-man’s land, with a higher proportion of them neither in school nor at work. Key findings show:

    • 16 percent of high school students have dropped out of school and are unemployed, which is double the rate nationwide (8 percent).
    • 40 percent fail to graduate from high school in four years—up from 33 percent in last year’s Data Book—which places Puerto Rico in a last-place tie with the District of Columbia for on-time graduation rates among U.S. jurisdictions and is nearly double the national rate of 22 percent.
    • A teen birth rate of 51 per 1,000 female teenagers, well above the rate of 34 per 1,000 female teenagers for the U.S. overall.

    Despite the troubling economic circumstances of Puerto Rico’s children, there were some positive trends. The 2013 KIDS COUNT Data Book documented improvements in three out of four health indicators for Puerto Rico: the percent of low-birth-weight babies is still higher here but declined slightly to 12.6 percent; the percent of children without health insurance went from 5 to 4 percent; and the rate of child and teen deaths fell in recent years, too. The portion of children not attending preschool dropped from 51 percent to 47 percent.

    “Children must grow up healthy and have a good education if they are to be the resilient citizens, workers and leaders our nation needs. Puerto Rico is making gains in these areas that we hope will continue; however, the data released today certainly make the case for helping families improve their financial security and engaging teenagers to put them on the path to a productive future. Given the limited resources available today, these data can help policymakers consider where funding can most have an impact on children,” said Rivera-Hernández.

    The KIDS COUNT Data Book features the latest data on child well-being for every state, the District of Columbia and the nation. This information is available in the newly redesigned KIDS COUNT Data Center, which also contains the most recent national, state, and local data on hundreds of measures of child well-being. Data Center users can create rankings, maps and graphs for use in publications and on websites, and view real-time information on mobile devices. NCLR will release local data specific to the 78 municipios in Puerto Rico later this week and will work to ensure that policymakers and government agencies in these areas have access to these statistics.

    For further information or to schedule an interview about children’s well-being in Puerto Rico, please contact Nayda Rivera-Hernández at (787) 649-9501 or nrivera@nclr.org, or Kathy Mimberg at (202) 776-1714 or kmimberg@nclr.org. Also, updates on this issue are available via Twitter at @NCLR and @nayda4prkids.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

    The Annie E. Casey Foundation creates a brighter future for the nation’s children by developing solutions to strengthen families, build paths to economic opportunity and transform struggling communities into safer and healthier places to live, work and grow. For more information, visit www.aecf.org. KIDS COUNT® is a registered trademark of the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

    ###


    0 0

    PARA DIFUSIÓN INMEDIATA Contacto:
    24 de junio de 2013 Nayda I. Rivera-Hernández
      (787) 649-9501
      nrivera@nclr.org

     


    Un nuevo informe del NCLR documenta los riesgos y oportunidades en cada uno de los 78 municipios de Puerto Rico

    SAN JUAN, P.R.—El informe NUESTROS NIÑOS CUENTAN – Puerto Rico Libro de Datos 2012, publicado hoy por el NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza por sus siglas en inglés), muestra un panorama estadístico mixto de la niñez y juventud en Puerto Rico debido al alto porcentaje de niños que viven en pobreza y la tendencia positiva en indicadores de salud clave.  El informe fue publicado durante el segundo encuentro de organizaciones sin fines de lucro Fomentando Alianzas convocado por la Fundación Banco Popular, y que agrupa a líderes de organizaciones de diferentes municipios para atender asuntos vitales que enfrentan las comunidades en Puerto Rico

    El informe contiene datos exhaustivos sobre la población de personas menores de 18 años que viven en Puerto Rico y mide las tendencias en el bienestar demográfico, socioeconómico, de salud y educación.  Este informe documenta que, mientras las circunstancias económicas que impactan directamente el bienestar de la niñez continúan empeorando, hay mejoras en las tasas de nacimientos a adolescentes, el por ciento de nacimientos prematuros y las tasas de mortalidad infantil.

    “Este informe del NCLR muestra que la mayoría de los niños en Puerto Rico vive en familias que enfrentan circunstancias financieras nefastas que tienen un impacto enorme en su bienestar," dijo Nayda Rivera-Hernández, Analista Sénior del NCLR, “Necesitamos tener una discusión seria entre los desarrolladores de políticas, líderes de negocios y padres de cómo cambiar este panorama a nivel municipal para que todos los  niños de la isla disfruten de una niñez segura y puedan convertirse en adultos productivos y exitosos”.

    Las medidas económicas evaluadas en este estudio sobre los 78 municipios de Puerto Rico son peores que en cualquier otra jurisdicción estadounidense, particularmente el hecho de que el 84% de los niños viven en zonas de alta pobreza, siete veces la cifra promedio en los Estados Unidos (12%).  Otros hallazgos clave del informe NUESTROS NIÑOS CUENTAN – Puerto Rico Libro de Datos 2012 incluyen:

    •    La mediana de ingreso familiar para una familia de dos adultos y dos niños en Puerto Rico fue de $19,658 durante el período de 2008–2010, fluctuando entre $10,411 en Guayanilla y $38,602 en Guaynabo.

    •    Más de la mitad de los niños de la isla viven en familias monoparentales—fluctuando entre 37.8% en Patillas y 73.8% en Cataño—y tiene padres sin un empleo seguro.

    •    La tasa de mortalidad en niños entre las edades de uno y 14 años empeoró un 30% entre el 2008 y el 2009, cuando las muertes aumentaron de 13.3 a un 17.2 muertes por cada 100,000 niños en ese rango de edad.  De los municipios que informaron muertes de niños, San Sebastián tiene la tasa más alta de 63 por cada 100,000 y Aguadilla tiene la tasa más baja de 8.9 por cada 100,000.

    •    La tasa de adolescentes en la isla que no van a la escuela y están desempleados mantiene una tendencia ascendente, en un 16% esta tasa es el doble de la tasa a nivel de EE.UU. y se manifiesta más en Humacao, Juana Díaz,, Ponce y Río Grande.

    “En Fundación Banco Popular estamos convencidos de que la única forma de adelantar misiones independientes y comunes de las organizaciones que apoyamos es a través de alianzas sólidas y solidarias.  Por eso colaboramos con el Consejo Nacional de La Raza.  El informe Nuestros niños cuentan – Puerto Rico Libro de Datos 2012 presenta información confiable y necesaria para que las organizaciones sin fines de lucro, entidades gubernamentales y privadas puedan desarrollar soluciones a retos existentes con base en indicadores claves de bienestar de nuestra niñez y juventud”, dijo Beatriz Polhamus, Directora Ejecutiva de la Fundación Banco Popular.

    El NCLR es la organización beneficiaria en Puerto Rico de la red de proyectos KIDS COUNT de la Fundación Annie E. Casey, que publicó hoy el 2013 KIDS COUNT Data Book que contiene los datos más recientes del bienestar de la niñez para EE.UU., para cada estado, para el Distrito de Columbia y para Puerto Rico.  El NCLR ha administrado el proyecto KIDS COUNT – Puerto Rico por los últimos 10 años y ha contribuido a reforzar la información sobre el bienestar de la niñez y la juventud a través de publicar informes, mantener en línea y como recurso gratuito, la base de datos del Centro de Datos KIDS COUNT y participar en múltiples iniciativas para defender y apoyar a los niños de la isla.

    El NCLR ha hecho un llamado para mejorar la recopilación de datos y el acceso a la información sobre la niñez y juventud en Puerto Rico y ha recomendado que los niños y las niñas de la isla sean incluidos en los estudios que incluyen a las demás jurisdicciones de EE.UU.  Además, el NCLR ha exhortado a las agencias de Puerto Rico que recopilan información a que la analicen por edades sencillas o en categorías agrupadas más pequeñas, en lugar de agrupar a todos los niños en la categoría de “menores de 18 años” y ha abogado para que regularmente se publique en línea la información sobre el bienestar de la niñez a nivel municipal.  El informe NUESTROS NIÑOS CUENTAN – Puerto Rico Libro de datos 2012 está disponible en línea.

    Esta investigación fue subvencionada en parte por la Fundación Annie E. Casey y la Fundación Banco Popular, a través de su apoyo al proyecto KIDS COUNT – Puerto Rico del NCLR.

    NCLR –la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos– trabaja para mejorar las oportunidades para los hispanoamericanos.  Para más información sobre el NCLR, visite www.nclr.org, o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

    ###
     


    0 0

     

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact:
    June 24, 2013 Nayda I. Rivera-Hernández
      (787) 649-9501
      nrivera@nclr.org

     

    New NCLR report documents risks and opportunities in each of Puerto Rico’s 78 municipios

    SAN JUAN, P.R.—The “2012 KIDS COUNT – Puerto Rico Data Book,” released today by NCLR (National Council of La Raza), provides a mixed portrait of children and youth in Puerto Rico’s 78 municipios, noting the high percentage of children living in poverty yet demonstrating positive changes in key health indicators.  The book was released at a briefing hosted by Fundación Banco Popular as part of its Fomentando Alianzas conference, which brought together nonprofit leaders from different municipios to address vital issues in Puerto Rico’s communities.

    The report contains extensive data about Puerto Rico’s youth under 18 and measures trends in demography, health, education and socioeconomic well-being.  The report shows that while economic circumstances that directly impact child well-being continue to worsen in Puerto Rico, there are improvements in the teen birth rate, the percent of premature births and the infant mortality rate.

    “NCLR’s report shows that the majority of children in Puerto Rico live in families facing dire financial circumstances, which has an enormous impact on their well-being,” said Nayda Rivera-Hernández, Senior Research Analyst at NCLR.  “We need a critical discussion among policymakers, business leaders and parents about how to change this outlook at the municipio level so that all children can enjoy a secure childhood and become productive, successful adults.”

    The economic indicators evaluated in this report for Puerto Rico’s 78 municipios are far worse than for any other U.S. jurisdiction; 84 percent of children here live in high-poverty areas, which is seven times the national rate (12%).  Other key findings include:

    •    The median income for a family of two adults and two children in Puerto Rico is $19,658, ranging from $10,411 in Guayanilla to $38,602 in Guaynabo.

    •    More than half of the children on the island live in single-parent families—ranging from 37.8% in Patillas to 73.8% in Cataño—and have parents who are not securely employed.

    •    The mortality rate for children ages 1 to 14 worsened by 30% between 2008 and 2009, when deaths rose from 13.3 to 17.2 per 100,000 in 2009.  Of the municipios that reported deaths of children, San Sebastián holds the highest rate of 63 per 100,000 and Aguadilla holds the lowest rate of 8.9 per 100,000. 

    •    The rate of teenagers on the island who do not attend school and are unemployed remains on an upward trend; it currently stands at 16%, double the U.S. national rate, and is particularly pronounced in Humacao, Juana Díaz, Ponce and Río Grande.

    “Fundación Banco Popular firmly believes that the only way to advance the individual and shared missions of the nonprofit organizations we support is through strong and solid alliances.  This is why we support the National Council of La Raza.  The ‘2012 KIDS COUNT – Puerto Rico Data Book’ presents reliable and necessary information so that private and government institutions can develop data- driven solutions to the existing challenges facing our youth,” said Beatriz Polhamus, Executive Director, Fundación Banco Popular.

    NCLR is the Puerto Rico grantee in the KIDS COUNT network of the Annie E. Casey Foundation, which today released the “2013 KIDS COUNT Data Book” featuring the latest data on child well-being for the U.S. as a whole, each state, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.  NCLR has called for improved collection and accessibility of data on children and youth in Puerto Rico, recommending that children on the island be included in national surveys and data be published regularly, online and at the municipio level.  The “2012 KIDS COUNT – Puerto Rico Data Book” is available online.

    This research was funded in part by the Annie E. Casey Foundation and Fundación Banco Popular through their support of NCLR’s KIDS COUNT – Puerto Rico project.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans.  For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

    ###
     


    0 0



    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:

    Camila Gallardo
    (305) 573-7329
    cgallardo@nclr.org

    This morning, in a 7-1 decision, the United States Supreme Court issued a ruling in Fisher v. University of Texas, a case that challenged the constitutionality of diversity programs in college admissions. The Supreme Court remanded the case back to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, citing the lower court’s failure to use correct standards to accurately evaluate the University of Texas’s admission policy.

    “We welcome today’s decision by the Supreme Court to preserve the critical programs that promote greater diversity at our colleges and universities. It is certainly in our collective interest as a nation to ensure that the next generation of leaders and our future workforce have access to our institutions of higher learning and are able to enhance that learning experience by sharing a classroom with students who have a variety of talents, backgrounds and life experiences,” said Janet Murguía, President and CEO of NCLR (National Council of La Raza).

    While today’s ruling does not represent final deliberation on the issue of inclusive admissions programs, it has made clear that the highest court in the nation continues to support the importance of diverse learning environments. In the majority opinion, Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote, "The attainment of a diverse student body serves values beyond race alone, including enhanced classroom dialogue and the lessening of racial isolation and stereotypes.”

    The University of Texas, like many other institutions of higher learning committed to diversity, had crafted an admissions policy that takes a comprehensive approach to evaluating students for entrance to the school. Race, community service and test scores are a few of the factors considered.

    “The University of Texas has developed an admissions policy that is inclusive, fosters educational diversity and has received widespread support from coalitions as diverse as the defense and the business communities, 73 of which filed amici briefs supporting UT. We are hopeful that the lower court will rule in its favor and reaffirm our nation’s commitment to inclusion and equal opportunity,” concluded Murguía.

    ###
     


    0 0



    PARA DIVULGACIÓN INMEDIATA

    Contacto:

    Camila Gallardo
    (305) 573-7329
    cgallardo@nclr.org

    Esta mañana, en un voto de 7 a 1, la Corte Suprema de los estados unidos emitió una decisión en el caso de Fisher v. University of Texas, caso que reto la constitucionalidad de los programas de diversidad en el proceso de admisión universitaria. La Corte Suprema devolvió el caso a la Corte de Apelaciones del Quinto Circuito, citando la falta de la corte menor a utilizar estándares correctos para evaluar la póliza de admisión de la Universidad de Texas.

    “Le damos la bienvenida hoy a la decisión de la Corte Suprema a preservar estos programas tan críticos que promueven mas diversidad en nuestros colegios e universidades. Es cierto que nuestro interés colectivo como nación es asegurar que las próximas generaciones de líderes y trabajadores tengan acceso a las instituciones de alta enseñanza y que puedan acentuar esa experiencia compartiendo una aula con estudiantes de una diversidad de talentos, etnias, y experiencias de vida,” dijo Janet Murguía, Presidenta y Gerente General del NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza por sus siglas en ingles).

    Mientras que esta decisión no representa el argumento final sobre estos programas de diversidad en la admisión, está claro que la Corte más alta de la nación continua apoyando la importancia de ambientes de enseñanza diversos. En su opinión de hoy, el Juez Anthony Kennedy escribió: “El tener un grupo de estudiantes diversos sirve valores mas allá de los que tienen que ver con la raza, incluye acentuar el diálogo en las aulas y ayuda a disminuir el aislamiento racial y los estereotipos.”

    La Universidad de Texas como muchas instituciones de alta enseñanza que están comprometidos con la diversidad, han desarrollado una póliza de admisión que utiliza una estrategia comprensiva para evaluar a los estudiantes que incluye—raza, servicio comunitario, y grados en examines como algunos de los factores considerados.

    “La Universidad de Texas ha desarrollado una póliza de admisión que es inclusiva, promueve la diversidad educativa y ha recibido apoyo abrumador de un grupo de diversas coaliciones que incluyen aquellos en el campo de la defensa hasta la comunidad empresarial. Setenta y tres de estos grupos remitieron escritos amici apoyando a la Universidad de Texas. Estamos ansiosos que la corte menor vote a favor de la Universidad y con esa decisión reafirme el compromiso con la inclusión y la oportunidad para todos,” concluyo Murguía.

    ###
     


    0 0

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact:
    June 25, 2013 Julian Teixeira
      (202) 776-1812
      jteixeira@nclr.org


    Speakers at NCLR Conference include Rita Moreno, Marc Morial and Minnie Miñoso

    NEW ORLEANS—NCLR (National Council of La Raza) today announced highlights of its upcoming 2013 Annual Conference and National Latino Family Expo®, the premier events for Latinos across the nation, which will take place, for the first time, in New Orleans. The NCLR Annual Conference and National Latino Family Expo will run from Saturday, July 20 through Tuesday, July 23 at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center.

    NCLR’s Annual Conference and National Latino Family Expo have consistently been the gathering location for some of the most powerful, prominent and influential voices in and working with the Latino community, including community leaders, activists and volunteers; elected and appointed officials; and members of the corporate, philanthropic and academic communities. Attendees will have the ultimate opportunity to learn about current issues in immigration, education, civil rights, health, workforce development, youth leadership and other topics that impact not only Latinos, but all American communities.

    “Since we began working with the Latino community in New Orleans several years ago, NCLR has sought ways to bring national attention to the rapid growth of the Latino population in this city and, most of all, to highlight the contributions that Hispanic families and workers have made and continue to make to the entire Gulf South,” said Janet Murguía, NCLR President and CEO. “Bringing our Annual Conference, the largest national annual event in the Hispanic community, to this amazing city is one more step in raising awareness and connecting this emerging community with Latino leaders from all over the country.”

    The 2013 NCLR Annual Conference, themed “Rise as One,” title-sponsored by Toyota and Walmart, will feature more than 60 workshops, four town halls, five key meal events including the Latinas Brunch and the NCLR Awards Gala and multiple networking opportunities. This year’s Conference features a list of impressive speakers that was unveiled today, including legendary entertainer Rita Moreno, National Urban League President and CEO Marc Morial, W.K. Kellogg Foundation President and CEO Sterling Speirn, Telemundo news anchors José Díaz-Balart and María Celeste Arrarás, Girl Scouts of America CEO Anna Maria Chávez, baseball great Minnie Miñoso and many more.

    “Toyota is honored to serve as a title sponsor of this year’s NCLR Annual Conference, an important forum for issues that impact not only Latinos in our country, but all Americans,” said Bob Carter, senior vice president, Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A. Inc. “We believe this year’s conference will play a big role in supporting NCLR’s commitment to education and advocacy work and we’re excited to participate.”
    “As a title sponsor of this event, Walmart recognizes the importance of engaging with America’s growing Latino community," said Paul Gomez, Director of Corporate Affairs Constituent Relations, Walmart. "We are proud to play an important and prominent role at this year’s NCLR Annual Conference.

    Additionally, the 2013 NCLR Annual Conference brings some of the best entertainment in the Latino community to New Orleans, featuring bachata sensation Leslie Grace and pop singer Jon Secada.

    All attendees and the New Orleans community are invited to visit the National Latino Family Expo, title-sponsored by UPS, a free family fair open to the public, featuring various themed pavilions that offer exciting and cutting-edge games, prizes, live entertainment, product samples and more. The National Latino Family Expo, also taking place at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, will be open to the public from Saturday, July 20 through Monday, July 22.

    “UPS is proud to be the Title Sponsor of NCLR’s National Latino Family Expo since it’s inception. It has become a unifying point at the conference where families, businesses and other community stakeholders come together and address important issues that impact not only Latino families and communities, but all Americans” states Eduardo Martinez, President of The UPS Foundation.

    The NCLR National Latino Family Expo is one of the largest events in the country focused on resources and activities for the Latino family, with more than 200 exhibitors showcasing their products and services. From live entertainment and giveaways to free health screenings and informative demonstrations, everyone will discover something new in a fun and exciting environment that the entire family will enjoy. The Expo is open to all, and attendance is free of charge! Known figures in sports and entertainment will sign autographs for fans, costumed characters such as Dora the Explorer will entertain kids and all members of the family can learn something new through a healthy cooking demonstration. A highlight of the National Latino Family Expo is our Health and Fitness/Tu Salud Pavilion, where participants can receive a variety of free health screenings, including lung, dental, cholesterol and vision, just to name a few. The Science and Technology/El Futuro Pavilion will highlight opportunities and advances in science, technology, engineering and mathematics that make our everyday lives easier. It is a fun, interactive and informative experience in a safe and inviting family setting.

    Click here to learn more about or to register for the 2013 NCLR Annual Conference in New Orleans.

    To obtain media credentials for the 2013 NCLR Annual Conference, press may register at http://nclr.emsreg.com/nclr13/public/mediaregistration.aspx.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Latinos. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org, or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

    ###


    0 0

    PARA DIVULGACIÓN INMEDIATA                                                                Contacto:
    25 de junio de 2013                                                                                       Julián Teixeira
                                                                                                                        (202) 776-1812
                                                                                                                        jteixeira@nclr.org 


    Entre los ponentes de la Conferencia del NCLR estarán Rita Moreno, Marc Morial y Minnie Miñoso

    NEW ORLEANS, La.—Hoy, el Consejo Nacional de La Raza (NCLR, por sus siglas en inglés) anunció lo destacado de su próxima Conferencia Anual 2013 y Feria Nacional de la Familia Latina®, el principal evento para los latinos de todo el país que se llevará a cabo, por primera vez, en New Orleans del sábado 20 de julio al martes 23 de julio en el Centro de Convenciones Ernest N. Morial.

    La Conferencia Anual y la Feria Nacional de la Familia Latina del NCLR han sido el lugar de encuentro de algunas de las voces más poderosas, prominentes e influyentes de la comunidad latina incluyendo a líderes comunitarios; activistas y voluntarios; funcionarios electos y designados; miembros de corporaciones, instituciones filantrópicas y académicas. Los asistentes tendrán la gran oportunidad de actualizarse sobre temas de inmigración, educación, derechos civiles, salud, desarrollo personal, liderazgo juvenil y otros temas que afectan no sólo a los latinos, sino a todas las comunidades estadounidenses.

    “Desde que comenzamos a trabajar con la comunidad latina en New Orleans hace varios años, el NCLR ha buscado maneras de llamar la atención del país al rápido crecimiento de la población latina en esta ciudad y, principalmente, destacar las contribuciones que las familias y los trabajadores hispanos han hecho y continúan haciendo a la región del Golfo Sur”, dijo
    Janet Murguía, presidenta y directora general del NCLR . “Traer a esta increíble ciudad nuestra Conferencia Anual, el evento más grande a nivel nacional de la comunidad latina, es un paso más para concienciar y conectar a esta comunidad emergente con los líderes latinos de todo el país”.

    La temática de la Conferencia Anual 2013 del NCLR es “Levantémonos como uno” y estará patrocinada por Toyota y Walmart. La Conferencia contará con 60 talleres, cuatro reuniones municipales, cinco eventos alrededor de comida incluyendo Latinas Brunch y la Gala de los Premios NCLR, además de múltiples oportunidades para hacer contactos. La Conferencia de este año presenta una impresionante lista de ponentes revelada hoy, entre ellos están la artista legendaria Rita Moreno; el presidente y director general de La Liga Nacional Urbana Marc Morial; el presidente y director general de la Fundación W.K. Kellogg Sterling Speirn; los presentadores de Telemundo José Díaz-Balart y María Celeste Arrarás; la directora general de Girl Scouts of America Anna María Chávez; el gran beisbolista Minnie Miñoso y muchos más.

    Toyota está honrado en ser el patrocinador titular de la Conferencia Anual del NCLR de este año, un foro importante sobre temas que afectan no sólo a los latinos en nuestro país, sino a todos los estadounidenses”, dijo Bob Carter, vicepresidente sénior de Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A. Inc. “Creemos que la conferencia de este año jugará un papel muy importante en el apoyo al compromiso con la educación y el trabajo de defensa del NCLR y estamos muy emocionados por participar”.

    "Como patrocinador titular de este evento, Walmart reconoce la importancia de participar con la creciente comunidad latina de Estados Unidos”, dijo Paul Gómez, director de relaciones constitutivas de asuntos corporativos de Walmart. "Estamos orgullosos de jugar un papel importante en la Conferencia Anual del NCLR de este año".

    Además, la Conferencia Anual 2013 del NCLR traerá algunos de los mejores espectáculos de la comunidad latina a New Orleans, como la sensación de la bachata Leslie Grace y el cantante popular Jon Secada.

    Todos los asistentes y la comunidad de New Orleans está invitada a visitar la Feria Nacional de la Familia Latina, patrocinada por UPS. Es una feria familiar abierta al público, donde habrán varios pabellones temáticos ofreciendo emocionantes e innovadores juegos, premios, entretenimiento en vivo, muestras de productos y mucho más. La Feria Nacional de la Familia Latina, también tendrá lugar en el Centro de Convenciones Ernest N. Morial y estará abierta al público del sábado 20 de julio al lunes 22 de Julio.

    “UPS está orgulloso de ser el patrocinador oficial de la Feria Nacional de la Familia Latina del NCLR desde su comienzo. Ha llegado a ser un punto unificador en la conferencia donde familias, negocios y otras comunidades interesadas se reúnen y abordan temas importantes que afectan no sólo a las familias y comunidades latinas, sino a todos los estadounidenses”, afirma Eduardo Martínez, presidente de la Fundación UPS.

    La Feria Nacional de la Familia Latina es uno de los eventos más grandes en el país enfocado en recursos y actividades para la familia latina. Habrán más de 200 expositores que mostrarán sus productos y servicios. Desde entretenimiento en vivo y repartición de muestras hasta exámenes de salud, y demostraciones informativas. Todos encontrarán algo nuevo en un ambiente divertido y emocionante que toda la familia podrá disfrutar. La Feria está abierta a todos y la entrada es gratuita. Celebridades del deporte y el entretenimiento firmarán autógrafos a sus admiradores, personajes disfrazados tales como Dora la Exploradora entretendrán a los niños y todos los miembros de la familia podrán aprender algo nuevo en las demostraciones de cocina saludable. Algo sobresaliente de la Feria Nacional de la Familia Latina es nuestro Pabellón Tu Salud/ Salud y Bienestar, donde se ofrecerá a los participantes podrán recibir una variedad de exámenes gratuitos de pulmones, colesterol, visión y dental, por nombrar algunos.

    El Pabellón El Futuro/Ciencia y Tecnología destacará las posibilidades y los avances en ciencias, tecnología, ingeniería y matemáticas que facilitan nuestra vida diaria. Es una experiencia divertida, interactiva e informativa en un lugar seguro y familiar.

    Haga clic aquí para obtener más información o para registrarse para la Conferencia Anual 2013 del NCLR en New Orleans.

    Para obtener las credenciales de prensa para la Conferencia Anual 2013 del NCLR, se deberá registrar en http://nclr.emsreg.com/nclr13/public/mediaregistration.aspx.

    El Consejo Nacional de La Raza –la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos– trabaja para mejorar las oportunidades de la población latina. Para mayor información sobre el NCLR, por favor visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.


    ###


    0 0



    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:

    Camila Gallardo
    (305) 573-7329/(305) 215-4259
    cgallardo@nclr.org

    Today’s decision to strike this important provision will lead to erosion of progress in voter equality unless Congress acts quickly

    While the Supreme Court did not issue a ruling on Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act, today it struck down in a 5–4 decision Section 4(b), a provision of the law known as preclearance that provides a formula to identify areas that have prevalent histories of voting discrimination. Despite the fact that Congress overwhelmingly passed a 25-year extension of the Voting Rights Act just a few years ago, the Court placed the burden back on Congress to develop a new formula to determine which states or jurisdictions are subject to preclearance.

    “This decision does not kill the Voting Rights Act outright, but it does put it on life support. The Justices know full well that remanding this act to a deeply divided Congress puts the right to vote for millions of Americans in jeopardy,” said Janet Murguía, President and CEO of NCLR (National Council of La Raza). “We saw a slew of attempts to suppress the minority vote in the 2012 election, and the states in question have been at the forefront of these efforts, not to mention being ground zero for extreme anti-immigrant legislation such as HB 56 and SB 1070. While we should be very proud of the advancements that have been made since 1965, the need to protect the right to vote is not yet relegated to history—it is still at the very top of the civil rights agenda.”

    “As the late Latino icon Willie Velasquez said, ‘Su voto es su voz,’ and today the Supreme Court has endangered that voice since one in three Latinos live in areas covered under the Voting Rights Act. We urge Congress to act quickly to address this decision and continue safeguarding the rights of all Americans to vote. As an organization that registered tens of thousands of eligible Latino voters in states across the country in the last election, we know that any progress we have made would erode without a strong, intact Voting Rights Act,” concluded Murguía.

    ###
     


    0 0



    PARA DIVULGACIÓN INMEDIATA

    Contacto:

    Camila Gallardo
    (305) 573-7329
    cgallardo@nclr.org

    La decisión de hoy puede llegar a erosionar el progreso que se ha hecho en conseguir la igualdad en la votación si el Congreso no actúa rápidamente

    Mientras que la Corte Suprema no emitió una decisión sobre la Sección 5 del Acta de Derechos del Votante, hoy en un voto de 5 a 4, elimino la Sección 4(b), una provisión de la ley que da autorización conocido como ‘preclearance’. Esta provisión contiene la formula con la cual se identifica áreas geográficas que tiene historiales de discriminación en contra de votantes minoritarios. A pesar de que el Congreso abrumadoramente paso una extensión de 25 años al Acta de Derechos del Votante hace solo unos años, la Corte le devolvió la responsabilidad al Congreso para desarrollar una nueva fórmula para identificar los estados o municipalices que requieren este tipo de autorización.

    “Este decisión no elimina el Acta de Derechos del Votante, pero si la pone en peligro. Los jueces de la Corte Suprema saben muy bien que devolviéndole esta responsabilidad a un Congreso tan dividido pone en riesgo los derechos de millones de votantes en el pais,” dijo Janet Janet Murguía, Presidenta y Gerente General del NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza por sus siglas en ingles. “Vimos muchos intentos a oprimir los derechos de la voz minoritaria en las elecciones del 2012, y los estados identificados estában en la primera lienea de estos esfuerzos. Tambien fueron los estados donde se presentaron leyes anti-inmigrantes como la HB 56 y la SB 1070. Mientras que estamos orgullosos de los avanzes que se han hecho desde el 1965, la necesidad de proteger el derecho del voto sigue vigente y todavía sigue como prioridad en la agenda de los derechos civiles.”

    “Como decía el icono latino Willie Velasquez, ‘Su voto es su voz’ y hoy la Corte Suprema ha puesto en peligro a esa voz dado que uno de cada tres latinos viven en las áreas cubiertas por la Acta de Derechos del Votante. Instamos al Congreso que actué rápidamente para llegar a un acuerdo y seguir protegiendo los derechos de todos los americanos al voto. Como organización que inscribió a miles de votantes latinos elegibles a través del pais para las últimas elecciones, sabemos que cualquier progreso que se ha hecho en el tema corre en peligro sin una ley que este completa,” concluyo Murguía.

    ###
     


    0 0



    PARA DIVULGACIÓN INMEDIATA

    Contacto:

    Julián Teixeira
    (202) 776-1812
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    En un voto de 5-4 hoy, la Corte Suprema de los Estados Unidos anulo la Sección 3 del Acta de Defensa al Matrimonio (DOMA por sus siglas en ingles); esta sección prevenía a las parejas del mismo sexo reciban beneficios federales.

    “La decisión de hoy reconoce el matrimonio de las parejas de la comunidad LGBT como igual, es un paso monumental para este pais,” dijo Janet Murguía, Presidenta y CEO del NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza por sus siglas en ingles). “Con la eliminación de esta provisión, la Corte Suprema reafirmó el compromiso de este país con la igualdad, mandó un mensaje muy claro que nadie debe ser discriminado por quienes son o quienes quieren. Mientras que es indiscutible que queda mucho trabajo por hacer para asegurar que la igualdad matrimonial es la ley del país, hoy es un recuerdo que la arca de la historia siempre dobla al favor de la justicia y debemos de seguir luchando para que todos tengan los mismos derechos.”

    La decisión afectaría a más de 73,000 parejas del mismo sexo que incluye por lo menos un hispano entre la pareja, y miles más que son negados los beneficios que reciben otras parejas matrimoniales. Encuestas recientes indican que la mayoría de los americanos creen que el gobierno federal debe reconocer a matrimonios entre personas del mismo sexo, de acuerdo con un estudio hecho en el 2012 por el NCLR donde más de mitad de los latinos en el país apoyaban a la igualdad matrimonial.

    Una segunda decisión dada a conocer hoy sobre la Proposición 8—provision que prohibía el matrimonio de parejas del mismo sexo en California—también abra la puerta para que el estado más poblado del país comience de nuevo a reconocer y realizar matrimonios entre estas parejas. La Corte Suprema devolvió el caso a la corte menor que previamente había fallado en contra de la prohibición.

    “En despedir este caso, la Corte Suprema ha abierto el camino para que la igualdad matrimonial se reinstituye en California,” añadió Murguía. “Las cortes menores tuvieron la razón—el derecho al matrimonio debe ser protegido para todo Americano bajo la Constitución, incluyendo nuestros hermanos en la comunidad LGBT”.

    Para aprender más sobre el trabajo del NCLR sobre los temas LGBT, visite nuestra página de derechos civiles y justicia aquí.

    ###
     


older | 1 | .... | 50 | 51 | (Page 52) | 53 | 54 | .... | 79 | newer