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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:

    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    Today, in a vote nearly along party lines, the House of Representatives passed a series of amendments to the Department of Homeland Security’s budget that would not only undo President Obama’s administrative action providing relief from deportation for millions of workers and their families, but also end the highly successful Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which provides temporary legal status to the young people known as “DREAMers.” NCLR (National Council of La Raza) vehemently opposes these amendments and vows to fight these and similar proposals.

    “The House Republican leadership and Caucus may believe that they voted against the president today, but they actually voted against the millions of American families whose loved ones are working very hard to get right with the law. And they voted against millions more, including the majority of Americans who strongly support the substance of the president’s policy,” stated Janet Murguía, NCLR President and CEO.

    “Adding insult to injury, House Republicans voted to undo the one program in the last two decades that has done anything to help resolve our immigration issue, gratuitously harming hundreds of thousands of young people who are now able to make stronger contributions to our economy and communities. Our country has seen the benefit of helping DREAMers, as it will see the myriad benefits of helping families through administrative relief. That is why these efforts to take away relief will not stand,” continued Murguía.

    “I cannot think of a more substantively offensive and politically disastrous step for Republicans to take at this moment in time. It is no secret that the GOP is in a severe deficit when it comes to the Latino community and the Hispanic vote; it is a well-known fact among the many Republicans who support a sensible and effective immigration solution, and polling confirms it. Our community will not forget that the first order of business for House Republican leadership in the 114th Congress was a political stunt to crush the hope given to all these families without offering a single plausible alternative in return,” concluded Murguía.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:                                                     Contact:
    January 15, 2015                                                                         Julian Teixeira
                                                                                                          jteixeira@nclr.org
                                                                                                          (202) 776-1812

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—The countdown to the 2015 NCLR Annual Conference and National Latino Family Expo® in Kansas City, Mo., is on. Join Janet Murguía, President and CEO of NCLR (National Council of La Raza), as she previews what to expect when the largest gathering of influential individuals, organizations, institutions and companies working with the Hispanic community join together in the Heart of America. This year’s conference, which will take place at the Kansas City Convention Center from July 11 through July 14, promises to highlight the area’s increasingly diverse community, as well as the tremendous accomplishments and growing influence Latinos have throughout America’s heartland.

    MEDIA ADVISORY

    WHAT:       Countdown to the 2015 NCLR Annual Conference and National Latino Family Expo

    WHO:        Janet Murguía, President and CEO, NCLR
                      Mayor Pro Tem Cindy Circo, Kansas City, Missouri
                      Mayor Mark Holland, Kansas City, Kansas

    WHEN:      Tuesday, January 20; Noon (CDT)

    WHERE:    Central Exchange
                      1020 Central Street
                       Kansas City, MO 64105

    If you plan to cover the event, please RSVP to Julian Teixeira, Director of Communications, at jteixeira@nclr.org or (202) 776-1812.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.
     


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    PARA DIVULGACIÓN INMEDIATA                                                     PARA MÁS INFORMACIÓN:
    15 de enero, 2015                                                                              Camila Gallardo
                                                                                                             cgallardo@nclr.org
                                                                                                             (305) 215-4259


    WASHINGTON, DC—El NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) urge a la comunidad latina que se informe sobre la elegibilidad y la ayuda financiera disponible para obtener seguro médico durante el segundo período de inscripción bajo la ley de Cuidado de Salud Asequible (ACA). La fecha límite es el domingo, 15 de febrero de 2015.

    Hay varias formas de obtener información gratuita sobre las opciones para un seguro médico. Organizaciones sin fines de lucro locales (por ejemplo: clínicas comunitarias, el departamento de salud, bibliotecas públicas, o ferias de salud) tienen información. También la comunidad puede llamar al 1-800-318-2596 donde les atenderán en su idioma y les ayudarán a llenar una aplicación o visitar al: www.CuidadodeSalud.gov para llenar una aplicación.

    Es obligatorio inscribirse en una cobertura de salud y las multas este año aumentarán para aquellos que no tengan un seguro médico. Para la cobertura en 2015, la inscripción abierta continuará hasta el 15 de febrero de 2015. Después de esta fecha, tendrán que esperar hasta el próximo período de inscripción. El Servicio Estadounidense de Ciudadanía e Inmigración (ICE) ha dicho que la información proporcionada en la aplicación bajo la ley de ACA se utilizará solamente para confirmar la elegibilidad de la persona para obtener cobertura de salud, y no se utilizará esta información para la aplicación de leyes migratorias.

    Los beneficios para las personas bajo la ley ACA incluyen 72 servicios preventivos que ahora ya no tienen costo. Entre estos servicios están: las visitas de rutina para niños, las evaluaciones de presión arterial y colesterol, el papanicolau y las mamografías, las vacunas contra la gripe para los niños y adultos.

    “La comunidad no debe perder la oportunidad de inscribirse y obtener un seguro médico. Es importante notar que ya no se les podrá negar cobertura a ninguna persona por tener una condición preexistente. Tener acceso a una cobertura de salud y cuidados médicos asequibles y de calidad, mejorará sus vidas”, dijo Delia Pompa, vicepresidenta de programas del NCLR.

    Para más información sobre los locales en su comunidad donde le pueden ayudar gratuitamente a revisar sus opciones e inscribirse, visite al: www.localhelp.healthcare.gov.

    NCLR–la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos– trabaja para mejorar las oportunidades de los hispanos. Para obtener más información sobre NCLR, por favor visite www.nclr.org, o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                     Contact:
    January 16, 2015                                                                                      Ricky Garza
                                                                                                                    (202) 776-1732
                                                                                                                    rgarza@nclr.org


    WASHINGTON, D.C.—NCLR (National Council of La Raza) will honor Martin Luther King, Jr. (MLK) Day with community service activities across the nation on Jan. 17–23. NCLR staff and AmeriCorps members will join local nonprofit organizations from the NCLR Affiliate Network in paying tribute to Dr. King through a variety of community service projects. Members of the public are invited to participate. Descriptions of each activity and contact information are listed below by state and community organization.

    CALIFORNIA
    AltaMed Health Services Corporation—Los Angeles
    Saturday, Jan. 17

    NCLR AmeriCorps members will participate in a beautification and teamwork -focused day at Warren Lane Elementary School. Members will paint a mural and retouch the school’s current artwork.
    Contact: Sergio Valenzuela, svalenzuela@la.altamed.org

    MAAC—San Diego
    Friday, Jan. 16 and Monday, Jan. 19

    NCLR AmeriCorps members will attend the YMCA MLK Human Dignity Award Breakfast on Jan. 16 honoring community members who have made a positive impact. AmeriCorps members will also join the 27th annual All Peoples Celebration on Jan. 19, during which local leaders will speak about the legacy of Dr. King.
    Contact: Willy Gloria, wgloria@maacproject.org

    The Unity Council—Oakland
    Monday, Jan. 19

    The public is invited to join The Unity Council in celebrating MLK Day with breakfast and a discussion on Dr. King’s legacy. All are invited to learn about community resources and how VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance) provides the community with vital assistance and works to diminish poverty with equal opportunity services available for everyone.
    Contact: Laura Espino, lespino@unitycouncil.org

    Youth Policy Institute—Los Angeles
    Saturday, Jan. 17

    Volunteers at this MLK event will collect and sort donated clothing, toiletries, and nonperishable items to be delivered to MEND (Meet Each Need with Dignity), which will distribute the items at 10641 N. San Fernando Road, Pacoima, CA 91331 to families in need.
    Contact: Jennifer Servin, jservin@ypiusa.org.

    ILLINOIS
    Gads Hill Center
    —Chicago
    Monday, Jan. 19 and Friday, Jan. 23

    Payless Cares is an initiative that provides up to $20 per child to shop at Payless. Members will set up in-store events on both days for 31 needy youth who are eligible to shop for shoes or other clothing. NCLR AmeriCorps members will be paired with students and assist them in the stores.
    Contact: Lisset Gonzalez, lgonzalez@gadshillcenter.org

    MARYLAND
    Maryland Multicultural Youth Center (MMYC)
    —Riverdale
    Monday, Jan. 19

    NCLR AmeriCorps members will lead education and enrichment activities for middle and high school students in Prince George’s County. The event seeks to inspire people to reflect on the importance of civil rights in their communities and work toward progress in equality. Keynote speaker Maryland Senator Victor R. Ramirez (District 47) and a presentation by AmeriCorps members will focus on Dr. King’s legacy of service, and past and modern civil right issues.

    At MMYC’s event, Buck Lodge Middle School will present an “I Have a Dream Mosaic,” inviting students to paint the changes they want to see in their communities. Nicholas Orem Middle School will present inspirational quotes. William Wirt Middle School will present a poem about race. Two schools will use performance to address discrimination: one with a skit (Northwestern High School) and one with a modern dance (Highpoint High School).
    Contact: Alyson Moore, Alyson@layc-dc.org

    TEXAS
    Southwest Key Programs
    —Austin
    Monday, Jan. 19

    NCLR AmeriCorps members will gather at the MLK statue on the grounds of University of Texas at Austin and march to celebrate Dr. King’s legacy. Prior to the march, they will coordinate a food drive at East Austin College Prep to support the Capital Area Food Bank.
    Contact: Kristan Silva, ksilva@swkey.org

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                    Contact:
    January 21, 2015                                                                                       Joseph Rendeiro
                                                                                                                       (202) 776-1566
                                                                                                                       jrendeiro@nclr.org

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—In response to last night’s State of the Union address, in which President Obama highlighted the progress American families have made over the past two years thanks to a recovering economy, Janet Murguía, President and CEO of NCLR (National Council of La Raza), has called on policymakers to continue expanding opportunities for hard-working families and protect programs that have improved the lives of millions of Latinos.

    “The U.S. economy continues on the path to recovery and as a result, Latino unemployment rates are the lowest they’ve been since 2008. While our community has seen marked improvements, many Latino families are still not feeling the full benefit of that recovery when it comes to their personal finances,” said Murguía. “We implore lawmakers to pursue a legislative agenda that will continue to secure the economic futures of all Americans, including Latinos, by promoting policies that help create quality jobs, ensure our workforce has the necessary training and education available to compete in the 21st-century job market, protect vital tax credits for working families, and open up credit access to qualified home-buyers.”

    In the days leading up to the State of the Union, the president offered a number of policy proposals aimed at improving economic conditions for working families. NCLR applauds the president’s plan to extend much-needed tax credits to middle- and low-income communities, as well as his proposal to cut fees on Federal Housing Administration loans, enabling more first-time homebuyers to purchase a house. He also highlighted the need to make higher education more affordable for millions of hard-working students. Latinos have seen significant increases in graduation and college enrollment rates, but more must be done to guarantee that quality education, from kindergarten to college, remains affordable and accessible for all Americans.

    “Pursuing policies that open opportunities and provide Americans with the tools to achieve their dreams is not a Republican or Democratic ideal—it is an American ideal,” said Murguía. “We echo the president’s call for both parties to work together so they can find common ground to continue moving this country forward.”

    During his speech, President Obama emphasized the success his administration has had in encouraging more Americans to sign up for health care under the Affordable Care Act. Over the past year, nearly 7 million people have signed up for coverage, resulting in a significant drop in the rates of uninsured Hispanics.

    Meanwhile, on immigration, the president vowed to defend his administrative actions, which could bring some relief to approximately 5 million immigrants through the use of legitimate prosecutorial discretion. He urged Congress to work on a law that upholds our tradition as a nation of laws and a nation of immigrants.

    “We are pleased to hear the president reiterate his plans to defend administrative relief regardless of any attempts by Congress to backtrack on this issue. His executive action will make our economy stronger, our country safer, and millions of American families more stable,” concluded Murguía. “The new Congress now has a choice to make on immigration—improve the situation, or make it worse. We hope they’ll choose to be agents of progress by finally delivering sensible and effective immigration legislation.”

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:

    Camila Gallardo
    cgallardo@nclr.org
    (305) 215-4259

    Fifteen educators chosen for program that strengthens advocacy on behalf of Latino students

    NCLR (National Council of La Raza) is pleased to announce that 15 stellar educators from California, Colorado, Utah, Tennessee, Massachusetts, Missouri, Texas and Washington, D.C. were selected from a competitive pool of applicants as the 2015 Fellows and Master Fellows for the National Institute for Latino School Leaders (NILSL). NILSL, launched in 2011 by NCLR in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, is the only institute that trains school administrators to advocate for national- and state-level policies that strengthen the education of Latino students and English language learners (ELLs).

    Designed for mid- to senior-level education leaders who show high potential, this fellowship will equip the Fellows with the advocacy and communication skills needed to promote an equitable policy agenda and serve as spokespersons for NCLR. The 2015 NILSL fellowship is composed of two cohorts:

    NILSL Fellows, Cohort IV: These educators will be introduced to policymaking, advocacy and communication skills.

    Master Fellows: These NILSL alumni who successfully completed Cohort II or III will deepen their understanding of policymaking and lend their advocacy efforts to one of the following areas:

    • Parent engagement
    • Common Core State Standards
    • Accountability metrics
    •  School climate
    • Teacher effectiveness

    NILSL provides NCLR Affiliates with an opportunity to strengthen their collective voice by bringing together a national cohort of reform-minded educators who share a common vision, mission and purpose. The ultimate goal of this institute is to elevate the voices of school leaders advocating for reform measures, accountability systems and quality programs in the Latino community.

    “We are excited to welcome the educators who were selected as 2015 NILSL Fellows. Their commitment to Latino students and their families is evident through years of dedication to their communities, especially in urban public school settings,” said Margaret R. McLeod, Deputy Vice President, Education and Workforce Development, NCLR.

    Over the course of the year, the Fellows will receive training to serve as NCLR spokespersons and active agents in the policymaking process. They will join a policy group and explore a pressing policy topic affecting Latino and ELL students. As the fellowship’s signature project, each group will present a policy memo to a panel of national experts. The Master Fellows experience will culminate with a congressional briefing in Washington, D.C., and two additional state-level activities.

    “We are more than confident that the NILSL fellows will use their combined strengths and passions to serve as impeccable leaders. With their strong voices, they will improve the educational environment for Latino students not only in their local school systems, but also on a national level,” said McLeod.

    The NILSL Fellows are based at schools that belong to NCLR’s extensive Affiliate Network of community-based organizations throughout the U.S. The 2015 NILSL fellows are:

    • St. Claire Marlin Adriaan, Academia Avance (Los Angeles, Calif.)
    • Ryan Monroe, Carlos Rosario International Public Charter School (Washington, D.C.)
    • Jaime Rene Huerta, East Austin College Prep (Austin, Texas)
    • Kristin L. McGraner, STEM Preparatory Academy (Nashville, Tenn.)
    • Tommy Ramirez, MAAC (Calif.)
    • Alexandra Oliver-Davila, Sociedad Latina (Boston, Mass.)
    • Bianca Arriazola, AAMA George I. Sanchez Charter School (Houston, Texas)
    • Ed Mendez, Alta Vista Charter School (Kansas City, Mo.)
    • Heather McManus, Camino Nuevo Charter Academy, Harvard Campus (Los Angeles, Calif.)
    • Cheryl Anderson, GOAL Academy (Colorado Springs, Colo.)
    • Gini Pupo-Walker, Conexión Américas (Nashville, Tenn.)
    • Kevin Myers, Youth Policy Institute Charter Schools (Los Angeles, Calif.)
    • Crystal Gallegos, Chavez/Huerta K-12 Preparatory Academy (Pueblo, Colo.)
    • Jennifer Amador Mayer-Glenn, Mountain View Elementary School and Glendale Community Learning Center (Glendale, Utah)
    • Marisol Rerucha, MAAC Community Charter School (Chula Vista, Calif.)

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                            Contact:
    February 3, 2015                                                                               Joseph Rendeiro
                                                                                                               (202) 776-1566
                                                                                                               jrendeiro@nclr.org

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—Yesterday, President Obama laid out his proposed 2016 budget, which would effectively repeal sequestration while providing more funding for critical programs that help middle- and low-income families. NCLR (National Council of La Raza) supports the president’s proposal and encourages Congress to pass a budget that targets communities that have yet to feel the benefits of the economic recovery.

    “We hope that Congress can find common ground on key aspects of the president’s vision to invest in children, strengthen working families and grow the economy,” said Eric Rodriguez, vice president of the Office of Research, Advocacy, and Legislation at NCLR. “Latino families bore much of the brunt of sequestration, making it clear that we cannot cut our way to a better future. Ensuring better returns on hard work and greater investment in educational opportunities for all students, regardless of background or family income, are critical to the success of Latino families and the country as a whole.”

    The president’s budget includes $1 billion in additional funding for the Head Start Program and $1 billion more for Title I to support low-income schools. The president’s proposal also reaffirms the administration’s commitment to the Earned Income Tax Credit and Child Tax Credit, the refundable portions of which are set to expire in 2017. Unless Congress acts to make permanent policies from 2009 that targeted low-wage workers and larger families, 16 million Americans—including three million Latino children—could be pushed below the poverty line or further into poverty.

    “The president has provided a solid framework for Congress to work from. We implore our lawmakers to work together to pass a responsible budget that both grows our economy and invests in working families,” concluded Rodriguez.

    For NCLR’s analysis of the president’s 2016 budget, visit http://www.nclr.org/index.php/publications/nclr_analysis_of_the_presidents_2016_budget/.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                         Contact:
    February 9, 2015                                                                             Camila Gallardo
                                                                                                             (305) 215-4259
                                                                                                             cgallardo@nclr.org

    MIAMI—A free community event yesterday sponsored by NCLR (National Council of La Raza), Hispanic Unity of Florida and the National Hispanic Council on Aging offered Miami residents information and assistance for health care enrollment. Participants learned about the health insurance options available through the Affordable Care Act (ACA); navigators were available to assist with online enrollment and to help review plans and costs. NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía stopped by the enrollment event, which was held at the NCLR Florida Regional Office in Miami just days before the national February 15 enrollment deadline.

    “Given the large number of Latinos who lack health insurance and the need to provide culturally and linguistically appropriate in-person assistance, enrollment events like this one are helping to make a difference in families’ lives. It’s important for the community to know financial help is available and that health insurance is more affordable than they may think. In fact, 93 percent of Florida’s potential Latino applicants qualify for some type of subsidy,” said Steven Lopez, Manager, NCLR Health Policy Project.

    Hispanics make up the nation’s largest uninsured population; in Florida alone, estimates have shown that nearly one-quarter of a million Latinos lack health coverage. Community events such as these are helping to bridge the gap by providing free information and enrollment assistance. In addition to getting help to enroll, attendees received additional information about ACA benefits.

    Under the Affordable Care Act, 72 preventive services are now covered free of charge (including mammograms and diabetes screenings), insurance providers can no longer deny coverage based on a pre-existing condition, and young adults can stay on their parents’ health insurance plans until the age of 26. Also important to note for ineligible spouses or parents applying for an eligible minor: the information provided on the application will not be shared for civil immigration enforcement purposes.

    “We urge the community to not delay. There are only a few days left to obtain quality and affordable coverage through the marketplace and avoid facing a penalty if not enrolled by the February 15 deadline,” concluded Lopez.

    All those eligible for health coverage under the ACA can visit www.HealthCare.gov and www.CuidadodeSalud.gov or call (800) 318-2596 for information in English or Spanish.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                      Contact:
    February 11, 2015                                                                       Julian Teixeira
                                                                                                          jteixeira@nclr.org
                                                                                                         (202) 776-1812

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—Thousands of people participated yesterday in a tele-town hall hosted by NCLR (National Council of La Raza) and learned about enrolling in health coverage available under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The tele-town hall was held to encourage everyone eligible to sign up for a health plan before the ACA open enrollment deadline on Sunday, February 15.

    The event speakers—Delia Pompa, Senior Vice President, Programs, NCLR; and Mayra Alvarez, Director, State Exchange Group, Center for Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services—emphasized that financial assistance is available to purchase an affordable plan, and free local support is available throughout the United States to help people understand their options and enroll. They urged people to visit www.HealthCare.gov and www.CuidadoDeSalud.gov or call (800) 318-2596 for information in English and Spanish.

    “As an organization that represents the most uninsured community in the nation, NCLR has long advocated for quality, affordable and accessible health insurance and care for all Americans,” said Pompa. “My message to the community is don’t delay. Get covered by the February 15 deadline! The ACA holds great promise for Latinos, and we cannot miss out on this opportunity to take care of ourselves and our loved ones.”

    Latinos stand to benefit significantly from new opportunities for quality, affordable health insurance. The speakers emphasized that with time running out to sign up for health plans by the February 15 deadline, it is critical that eligible individuals obtain information to understand their options and enroll.

    The town hall was open to callers from across the country with questions about the enrollment process; a special effort was made to reach residents of Florida and Texas, states with two of the highest rates of uninsured Latinos. In addition, several of the evening’s questions focused on the Medicaid coverage gap due to the fact that many town hall participants reside in Florida and Texas—both of which have refused to expand Medicaid eligibility.

    NCLR’s website has key enrollment resources and information available for those who have questions about the benefits and process of signing up for a health plan under the ACA. NCLR also will continue its work to advance Medicaid expansion, especially in Florida and Texas, where nearly one million Latinos are shut out of an opportunity for meaningful coverage.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                Contact:
    July 15, 2014                                                                                                       Kathy Mimberg
                                                                                                                               (202) 776-1714
                                                                                                                               kmimberg@nclr.org

     

    NCLR STUDY NOTES BARRIERS TO LATINO HEALTH AND
    CALLS FOR BETTER OUTREACH AND PREVENTION

    Increasing prevalence of chronic conditions, high cost of health care and projected aging present challenges to healthier Latino population and workforce

    WASHINGTON, D.C. and RIDGEFIELD, CONN.—In a report released today, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) examines the challenges faced by millions of Latinos who live with one or more chronic conditions that affect their daily lives. “An Inside Look at Chronic Disease and Health Care among Hispanics in the United States” documents a high rate of chronic disease and obesity among the Latinos surveyed, with nearly half of those with a chronic condition reporting their health as poor to fair. The study found that even though Latinos are accessing health care, they still confront many barriers—including affordability, immigration status and language—to maintaining their health and managing their chronic diseases. Of those surveyed, 25 percent had visited a hospital emergency room in the past 12 months, which is costly and cannot take the place of regular access to medical care for those with chronic conditions.

    “Latinos are among the fastest-growing segment of the American population and will represent nearly one-third of all U.S. workers by 2050. The ability of our nation to meet the economic demands of the future is closely tied to the health of this community. Affordable health insurance and access to high-quality medical care and information is vital to improving their lives,” said Delia Pompa, Senior Vice President, Programs, NCLR.

    The report was produced by NCLR with support from Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and in partnership with public health consulting firm John Snow, Inc. (JSI). Written surveys and focus groups were held with patients at Latino-serving community-based health centers across the U.S. that belong to the NCLR Affiliate Network. Key findings of this research include:

    A high rate of chronic disease and poor health. Sixty percent of survey respondents were told by a doctor that they have a chronic disease, and comorbidities were highly prevalent.

    Extreme rates of overweight/obesity, a key risk factor for chronic conditions. About 75 percent of survey respondents were either overweight or obese, but among them only about two-thirds (64.3 percent) had been told by a doctor that they were overweight. Three of the four major chronic diseases experienced by respondents—hypertension, diabetes, and arthritis-related conditions — are affected by weight.

    A disconnect with the health care system. Barriers posed by poverty, discrimination and low rates of health insurance were compounded by additional factors that Latinos face: immigration status, a lack of trust in the health system and language/cultural issues. About one-third of respondents reported difficulty in getting health information in Spanish, the preferred language among 74 percent of those surveyed. In nearly all of the focus groups, participants perceived that the fear of unintended immigration consequences is a deterrent for health care access in their communities.

    In the report, NCLR calls for the design and implementation of a large-scale, sustained public health initiative that focuses on linguistically and culturally appropriate obesity and chronic disease prevention and management via communications and community-based health education tailored to Latino families. Additional recommendations include improved bilingual health materials, investments in community health organizations that serve Latinos, an increase in culturally competent training for health care providers and stronger peer support programs within the Hispanic community. NCLR is also interested in expanded efforts to enroll Latinos in affordable health insurance. An infographic on Latino health was released with the report.

    “The research clearly underscores the need to expand programs such as NCLR’s promotores de salud, community health workers who are trusted sources of information and who provide culturally and linguistically appropriate education and support. Increased outreach through these types of programs is critical if we are to take on these real health challenges,” said Manuela McDonough, Associate Director, Institute for Hispanic Health, NCLR.

    The researchers note that as the Latino population ages, the prevalence of the chronic conditions they suffer from and the resulting proportion of medical costs are expected to increase. In 2060, Hispanics are expected to make up 38 percent of the nation’s population age 65 and older and to require more health care services. “More attention needs to be devoted to the consequences of aging on the health of the Latino population. Efforts must be rapidly expanded to prevent and more effectively manage common chronic diseases among the Latino community—diabetes, heart disease and obesity,” said James Maxwell, PhD, Director of Research and Policy, JSI.

    Health disparities make chronic disease management in the Latino community especially important. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 14 percent of Hispanics had two or more concurrent chronic diseases in 2010, a nearly 2 percent increase since 2000.

    “We are proud to support this critical research to better understand the health needs of the Latino community,” said Keri Yale, Director, Patient Advocacy and Professional Relations, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. “By identifying the barriers to prevention and care, we can design programs to address these issues and help the Latino community work with their health care providers to lead healthier lives.”

    Latino health will be a key agenda item at the 2014 NCLR Annual Conference on July 19–22 in Los Angeles. In addition to free screenings available to the public for vision, lung health, diabetes risk, blood pressure and more, almost a dozen workshops and a town hall will feature panel discussions on chronic disease, the promotores de salud community outreach model, campaigns to enroll Latinos in health insurance through the Affordable Care Act and other topics. To learn more, please review the events schedule or contact Kathy Mimberg at (202) 776-1714 or kmimberg@nclr.org. Reporters with press credentials can register to attend for free at http://nclr.emsreg.com/nclr14/public/mediaregistration.aspx.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                         Contact:
    February 17, 2015                                                        Camila Gallardo
                                                                                        (305) 215-4259
                                                                                        cgallardo@nclr.org

    Temporary delay will be used to continue preparing the Hispanic community for the imminent start of immigration relief programs

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—Yesterday, a federal district judge in Texas granted a preliminary injunction temporarily blocking the implementation of immigration relief programs created through executive action. The injunction is the result of a politically motivated lawsuit against the policies advanced through the use of prosecutorial discretion—the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) program and the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program—will provide millions of American families with much-needed relief from the deportation of a loved one. Despite yesterday’s decision, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) is confident that this ruling will not stand and encourages all eligible candidates for DACA expansion and for DAPA to continue preparing to submit their applications. In addition, the original DACA program, for immigrants who came to the U.S. as children and teenagers, and are under 30 years old, remains in place and those eligible should continue to apply or renew their applications.

    “We disagree with the court’s decision and believe a higher court will reaffirm the legitimacy of administrative relief, siding with countless legal scholars that the president was well within his authority to act,” said Janet Murguía, President and CEO of NCLR.

    “DACA and DAPA are among the only commonsense solutions on immigration that have emerged in the last two decades. Detractors of these programs may try to paint this as a fight with the president, but make no mistake: attempts to dismantle these programs are attacks on American families. They are attacks on U.S. citizen spouses and children who are seeing their families torn apart because some of our lawmakers refuse to do what is necessary to fix our immigration system,” said Murguía. “Those behind this lawsuit would do a much greater service to their states if they devoted this level of energy to getting their congressional delegations to act on immigration reform, rather than putting targets on the backs of families to settle a score with the president.”

    “Yesterday’s decision is only a delay. We are very confident that both DACA and DAPA will move forward. In the meantime, it is of the utmost importance that those who are eligible continue gathering all necessary materials and prepare to submit their applications as soon as the program starts.”

    For information about how to apply for administrative relief, please visit www.nclr.org. For the most up-to-date information about changing immigration laws, policies and news, download Immigo, a free app designed for anyone helping and working with immigrants. The app, which works with iPhone and Android devices, can be downloaded from the Apple iTunes and Google Play stores.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                       Contact:
    February 19, 2015                                                         Camila Gallardo
                                                                                           cgallardo@nclr.org
                                                                                           (305) 215-4259


    New brief cites improvements in educational achievement and persistent disparities among Latinos

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—As Congress continues to debate reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), NCLR (National Council of La Raza) today released Latinos in New Spaces: Emerging Trends and Implications for Federal Education Policy, a statistical brief providing insight into the state of Latino education. Latinos represent the fastest-growing segment of the nation’s student body population; by 2023 they will represent almost 30 percent of all students enrolled in U.S. schools. 

    Among the gains cited in the brief are significantly lower dropout rates and increased high school completion. A steady decline in the Latino dropout rate over the last two decades has resulted in an all-time low of 12.7 percent among 16- to 24-year-olds—less than half the 1993 rate of 27 percent. In 2012, Latino students had a high school completion rate of 73 percent, up from 61 percent in 1993. Between 2000 and 2013, the percentage of eighth-grade Hispanic students who achieved or surpassed proficiency levels in mathematics more than doubled. College attendance has also reached a record high: Hispanics enrolled in postsecondary education increased from 13.4 percent in 1972 to 37.5 percent in 2012.

    “Latino children have made important strides in our schools, and their educational achievement is attributed to their own hard work, along with rising academic expectations and standards by school districts, administrators, teachers and parents. The data show why the civil rights community has supported increased accountability and standards-based education reforms for the last two decades,” said Eric Rodriguez, Vice President, Office of Research, Advocacy and Legislation, NCLR.

    These gains represent significant improvements and are to be commended; however, more improvements are needed if Latino students are to reach parity with their peers. Hispanic students still lag behind their White counterparts in reading proficiency, with only 22 percent of Latinos scoring at or above proficiency, compared to 46 percent of Whites. Latino children are also less likely to be enrolled in preschool; in fact, only 57.6 percent of Latino three- to five-year-olds were enrolled in school, compared to 66.7 percent of Whites and 65.8 percent of Blacks. Early childhood education is critical to ensuring that students don’t begin kindergarten lagging in learning benchmarks.

    “The gains that Latino schoolchildren have made are impressive, and it’s important that we continue to build on this success. That is why we must ensure that Congress passes a robust ESEA that maintains a commitment to equity in our schools and vital civil rights protections. A decade ago, national education policy put a spotlight on Latinos and English language learners, which led to increased accountability and standards that have produced results. Reforms should make our schools better and ensure that all children have an equal chance at getting a good education,” said Rodriguez.

    Measuring progress and achievement is essential. Breaking down data by groups and reporting it broadly has already made a marked impact on student achievement. Thus, ESEA reauthorization must maintain the critical provisions of accountability and data transparency. Continued access to college- and career-ready standards, effective teachers, adequate funding of programs such as Head Start, GEAR UP and TRIO and effective implementation of supports are likewise necessary. Such proactive, targeted attention and investments provide Latino students with opportunities and the preparation to succeed in education and beyond.

    “Today’s Hispanic students represent 20 percent of America’s future labor force, and their educational success is tied to the nation’s future economic growth and prosperity. Policymakers and advocates must focus attention on raising academic achievement and improved learning for English language learner and minority children in schools. Our future depends on it,” concluded Rodriguez.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:

    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    Earlier today, the Department of Justice (DOJ) asked for an emergency stay of the preliminary injunction blocking implementation of immigration deferred action policies by the Department of Homeland Security. If granted, the stay could allow both the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) program and the expansion of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program to move forward as planned (the existing DACA program remains active and intact). DOJ also filed a notice of appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.

    “We stand solidly behind DOJ’s actions to allow the implementation of prosecutorial discretion and immigration relief policies to proceed. Blocking these programs will cause irreparable harm to millions of American families who live in fear of losing a loved one to deportation policies that are out of sync with our country’s security and economic interests,” said Janet Murguía, President and CEO of NCLR (National Council of La Raza). “Congress remains responsible for bringing some sanity to our immigration system. But in the meantime, our country should not be denied the benefits of these legitimate actions, which will improve our national security by having people go through background checks; will strengthen our economy by having those working do so legally, contributing more taxes and preventing bad employers from gaming the system; and will improve our social fabric by bringing stability to millions of families. We are confident that a higher court will ultimately reaffirm the constitutionality of both programs, and we encourage all eligible candidates to prepare their applications.”

    For information about how to apply for administrative relief, please visit www.nclr.org. For the most up-to-date information about changing immigration laws, policies and news, download Immigo, a free app designed for anyone helping and working with immigrants. The app, which works with iPhone and Android devices, can be downloaded from the Apple iTunes and Google Play stores.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                               Contact:
    February 26, 2015                                                                                 Julian Teixeira
                                                                                                               (202) 776-1812
                                                                                                               jteixeira@nclr.org

     

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—The 28th annual NCLR (National Council of La Raza) Capital Awards gala, which recognizes elected officials who promote legislation and public policies that benefit Hispanic Americans, will honor Sen. Cory Booker (D–N.J.) for his work to reform the nation’s juvenile justice system. 

    This year, Sen. Booker is expected to reintroduce bipartisan legislation, the “REDEEM Act,” which will help end the school-to-prison pipeline for young Latinos and give nonviolent criminals a better chance to find employment after they have served their sentences. NCLR has long fought at both the national and state levels to overhaul outdated “tough-on-crime” policies that have led to a disproportionate number of Latino youth being ensnared in the juvenile justice system. The organization is proud to recognize the efforts of Sen. Booker to work across party lines to find a commonsense solution.

    NCLR will also honor Frank Sharry, Founder and Executive Director of America’s Voice, with the NCLR Capital Award for Public Service. Under Sharry’s leadership, America’s Voice has spearheaded advocacy efforts to push for comprehensive immigration reform and administrative action from the president, often working hand-in-hand with NCLR. Sharry has been a critical ally in this debate and a champion for all American families threatened by deportation.

    More than 750 corporate, legislative and community leaders will be in attendance as NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía presents the awards to the 2015 recipients.

    Erika Gonzalez, Consumer Reporter/Anchor for NBC4 Washington, will serve as master of ceremonies at the event. Hyundai Motor America and Wells Fargo are event co-chairs. Additional sponsorship is provided by BP America Inc., Univision Communications Inc. and UPS as vice chairs, along with Bank of America, Comcast/NBCUniversal/Telemundo, Ford Motor Company and PepsiCo, Inc., among others. Last year’s award recipients included the Senate “Gang of Eight” and Fast for Families.

    MEDIA ADVISORY

    WHO:           Janet Murguía, President and CEO, NCLR
                        Sen. Cory Booker (D–N.J.)
                        Frank Sharry, Founder and Executive Director, America’s Voice

    WHAT:        2015 NCLR Capital Awards Gala

    WHEN:        Tuesday, March 3, 2015, 6:30–9:00 p.m.

    WHERE:      National Building Museum
                         401 F Street, NW
                         Washington, D.C. 20001

    To attend and cover, please contact Julian Teixeira, Director of Communications, at jteixeira@nclr.org or (202) 776-1812.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                      Contact:
    February 26, 2015                                                                                        Ricky Garza
                                                                                                                         (202) 776-1732
                                                                                                                         rgarza@nclr.org

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—Today, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) announced the addition of six community-based organizations to its Affiliate Network. The new members joining the existing network of nonprofit providers that work with the Latino community throughout the nation include Con Mi MADRE in Austin, Texas; ConnectFamilias in Miami, Fla.; Esperanza Health Centers in Chicago, Ill.; Neighborhood Housing Services of San Antonio, Inc. in San Antonio, Texas; Voces in Battle Creek, Mich.; and Youth Policy Institute Charter Schools (YPICS) in Los Angeles, Calif. These new members raise the number of NCLR affiliated organizations to 266 nationwide.

    “For more than 40 years, NCLR has partnered with community organizations across the country that provide vital services to help Latinos gain a good education, high-wage jobs and access to health care and homeownership opportunities,” said Sonia Pérez, NCLR Senior Vice President, Strategic Initiatives. “The NCLR Affiliate Network is the backbone of our organization, allowing us to disseminate information, learn about issues facing Latinos throughout the nation and collaborate with partners who generate opportunities that strengthen families and communities. We welcome these six organizations to our national network and look forward to collaborating with them to advance our work on behalf of Latinos.”

    For more information about NCLR’s new Affiliate organizations:
    • Con Mi MADRE (www.conmimadre.org)
    • ConnectFamilias (www.ConnectFamilias.org)
    • Esperanza Health Centers (www.esperanzachicago.org)
    • Neighborhood Housing Services of San Antonio, Inc. (www.nhsofsa.org)
    • Voces (www.vocesbc.org)
    • Youth Policy Institute Charter Schools (www.ypics.org)

    NCLR’s Affiliates include 266 community organizations that provide programs and services to millions of Hispanic Americans and use their expertise to give voice to issues facing Latinos. Through their work, these nonprofits provide educational tools for children and adults, prepare workers to enter the labor force, facilitate the integration of immigrants into schools and the workforce, register people to vote, provide health services and help families purchase and stay in their homes.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org, or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.


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    PARA DIVULGACIÓN INMEDIATA                                         PARA MÁS INFORMACIÓN:
    27 de febrero, 2015                                                                   Ricky Garza
                                                                                                      (202) 776-1732
                                                                                                       rgarza@nclr.org

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—Hoy, el NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) anunció que seis organizaciones comunitarias se han unido a la red de afiliados del NCLR cuyos miembros trabajan con la comunidad latina en todo el país; las organizaciones son: Con Mi Madre en Austin, Tex.; Connect Familias en Miami, Fla.; Esperanza Health Centers en Chicago, Ill.; Neighborhood Housing Services of San Antonio, Inc. en San Antonio, Tex.; VOCES en Battle Creek, Mich.; y Youth Policy Institute Charter Schools (YPICS) en Los Angeles, Calif. Ahora, el NCLR cuenta con 266 organizaciones como miembros afiliados en los EEUU.

    “Por más de cuarenta años, el NCLR ha trabajado con grupos comunitarios a través de los EEUU que proveen servicios vitales, que ayudan a los latinos obtener una buena educación, trabajos de alto ingreso, acceso al cuidado de salud y oportunidades de ser dueño de vivienda,” dijo Sonia Pérez, vicepresidente de iniciativas estratégicas del NCLR. “La red de Afiliados del NCLR es la esencia y el corazón el de nuestra organización. Nos permite diseminar información, aprender sobre los retos que enfrenta la comunidad latina y colaborar con grupos hermanos que generan oportunidades para fortalecer nuestras familias y comunidades. Les damos la bienvenida a estas seis organizaciones que ahora se unen a nuestra red nacional y nos entusiasma poder trabajar juntos para avanzar nuestras causas comunes.

    Para más información sobre las organizaciones nuevamente afiliadas del NCLR, visite su página de internet:
    • Con Mi Madre (www.conmimadre.org)
    • Connect Familias (www.ConnectFamilias.org)
    • Esperanza Health Centers (www.esperanzachicago.org)
    • Neighborhood Housing Services of San Antonio (www.nhsofsa.org)
    • VOCES (www.vocesbc.org)
    • Youth Policy Institute Charter Schools (YPICS) (www.ypics.org)

    Los afiliados del NCLR incluyen a 266 organizaciones comunitarias que proveen programas y servicios a millones de hispanos estadounidenses. A través de sus esfuerzos, educan a niños y adultos, ayudan a los trabajadores a prepararse para el empleo, enseñan inglés a los inmigrantes, inscriben a nuevos votantes elegibles, ayudan a las familias a comprar y conservar sus casas, y proporcionan servicios de salud.

    NCLR–la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos– trabaja para mejorar las oportunidades de los hispanos. Para obtener más información sobre NCLR, por favor visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:

    Ricky Garza
    (202) 776-1732; rgarza@nclr.org
    NCLR Press Office in Los Angeles
    (213) 743-6462 (Open July 18)

    LOS ANGELES—Attendees at the 2014 NCLR (National Council of La Raza) Annual Conference are invited to participate in A Night OUT with NCLR: Celebrating LGBT Champions and Allies, the annual LGBT reception honoring leading advocates and organizations within the LGBT Hispanic community. This year’s reception, presented by Prudential and sponsored by AT&T, Hilton and American Airlines, will honor award-winning actor, producer and activist Dan Guerrero, son of Chicano music legend Lalo Guerrero. Throughout his accomplished career, Guerrero has fiercely worked to bring more positive Latino images to the screen as a casting director, writer and, for the past 15 years, as a producer of diverse network and cable television programming. He has also been an outspoken supporter for LGBT rights, personally sharing his own experiences examining his identities as member of both the LGBT and Latino communities in his critically acclaimed autobiographical play “¡Gaytino!”

    MEDIA ADVISORY

    WHO:        Dan Guerrero, actor, producer, activist
                       Catherine Pino, Board member, NCLR

    WHAT:       A Night OUT with NCLR: Celebrating LGBT Champions and Allies

    WHEN:      Sunday, July 20, 2014, 5:30–7:30 p.m. PDT

    WHERE:    JW Marriott L.A. LIVE
                        Platinum Ballroom, Salon A-C
                        900 W Olympic Blvd.
                        Los Angeles, CA 90015

    TO RSVP: Please contact Joseph Rendeiro via email at jrendeiro@nclr.org.

    Reporters with current press credentials can register to attend for free at http://nclr.emsreg.com/nclr14/public/mediaregistration.aspx. 

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:

    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    Today, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) and the National Hispanic Leadership Agenda (NHLA) joined civil rights and women’s rights groups to file an amicus brief in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit supporting the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) regulation to extend federal minimum wage and overtime protections to home care workers. When the rule was finalized in September 2013, NCLR and its allies declared it a long-overdue victory for two million home care workers, 21 percent of whom are Latino. In a case brought by the Home Care Association of America against DOL, Judge Richard Leon of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia blocked the home care rule, which was set to be implemented in January. The amicus brief filed today supports DOL’s appeal of Judge Leon’s decision.

    “The Supreme Court has already decided that DOL was well within its authority to grant these much-needed protections to Latino home care workers. These are basic labor protections that home care workers have been excluded from for 40 years. To continue to stall implementation of these rules is not only unjust, it is blatantly disrespectful to those who we rely on to care for our loved ones,” said Eric Rodriguez, Vice President of the Office of Research, Advocacy and Legislation at NCLR. “Home care workers have waited long enough for fair pay. Further delay of these regulations is unacceptable.”

    “We cannot allow the unjust exploitation of home care workers to continue,” added Hector E. Sanchez, Executive Director of the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) and Chair of NHLA. “Attempts to further undercut and block pay equity for their hard work are fundamentally wrong and shameful. These caretakers, more than one in five of whom are Latinas, deserve to be treated with respect and rewarded fairly for their labor.”

    NCLR and NHLA are confident that DOL has strong legal standing in its appeal. In the meantime, they will continue to work with states to build on the groundwork laid to implement these rules.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:

    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    The U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee has begun a two-day markup of four immigration-related bills designed to attack immigrant and Latino families and deny due process to child refugees. Legislation under consideration would nationalize the widely discredited Arizona SB 1070 racial profiling law, escalate a wasteful and destructive enforcement-only approach to immigration, remove protections for children fleeing violence and block the president’s 2012 and 2014 immigration actions. NCLR (National Council of La Raza) stands in firm opposition to these bills, which do not bring this nation any closer to the comprehensive solution that we need.

    “These bills are a conscious, premeditated attack against millions of American families and a direct blow at the heart of the Latino community. They are representative of the backward thinking that has replaced a solution-driven approach to immigration in Washington, and they show a disregard for the civil rights of all Americans,” said Clarissa Martínez-De-Castro, Deputy Vice President of the Office of Research, Advocacy and Legislation at NCLR. “These bills seek to divide our country, spread fear in our communities and divert us from the sensible solutions that the vast majority of Americans support. By pursuing this legislation, House Republican leadership is sending a clear message that they intend to double down on extremist policies rather than govern responsibly. Latinos see these bills for what they are: not viable solutions, but blatant attempts to vilify our community and tear our families apart. And we will not forget.”

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:

    Julian Teixeira
    (202) 776-1812
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    Hundreds of leaders in the corporate, legislative and advocacy communities joined together at the 28th annual NCLR (National Council of La Raza) Capital Awards gala to honor Sen. Cory Booker (D–N.J.) and America’s Voice Founder and Executive Director Frank Sharry for their work in improving the lives of Latinos. Every year, the Capital Awards gala recognizes elected officials who promote legislation and public policies that benefit Hispanic Americans.

    “In his short time on Capitol Hill, Sen. Booker has worked with Republican colleagues to reform the nation’s juvenile justice system and end the school-to-prison pipeline for young Latinos,” said NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía. “Sen. Booker is the force behind the ‘REDEEM Act,’ which will overhaul outdated ‘tough-on-crime’ policies and give young Latinos ensnared in the juvenile justice system, as well as nonviolent criminals, a better chance to rebuild their lives. NCLR applauds the efforts of Sen. Booker and his colleagues to tackle this incredibly complicated issue, and we hope that other lawmakers will see the value of giving young people a second chance.”

    This year, NCLR also presented the 2015 Capital Award for Public Service to Frank Sharry for his unyielding commitment to fighting for immigrant families and comprehensive immigration reform. Sharry has been a consistently outspoken leader calling on lawmakers across the country to deliver a permanent solution to fix the nation’s broken immigration system. He has worked side by side with NCLR for decades to organize and rally support for reform.

    “We have deferred action, a bipartisan immigration bill in the Senate and the president’s executive actions thanks in large part to the work of Frank Sharry and America’s Voice,” Murguía added. “Frank has been a tremendous ally throughout this fight, always at the frontlines, willing to put his neck out for the sake of doing what’s right and fair for immigrant families. We have not won immigration reform yet, but our movement is certainly stronger because Frank Sharry is on our side.”

    Erika Gonzalez, Consumer Reporter/Anchor for NBC4 Washington, served as master of ceremonies at the event, which was held at the National Building Museum. Event co-chairs included Hyundai Motor America and Wells Fargo. Additional support was provided by BP America Inc., Univision Communications Inc. and UPS as vice chairs, along with Bank of America, Comcast/NBCUniversal/Telemundo, Ford Motor Company and PepsiCo, Inc., among others.

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