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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                 Contact:
    March 4, 2015                                                                                         Camila Gallardo
                                                                                                                    cgallardo@nclr.org
                                                                                                                    (305) 215-4259

    March gathering unites Latino students from across the United States for a unique experiential learning opportunity

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—On March 4–6 at Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., NCLR (National Council of La Raza) will host visiting Escalera Program participants from throughout the country during the Escalera Summit and Líderes Congreso, a part of the 2015 NCLR National Latino Advocacy Days. Since its inception in 2001, the NCLR Escalera Program has worked to improve educational and career outcomes for Latinos. Conceived to address the lack of culturally relevant program models that meet the specific challenges faced by many Latino students, the program provides resources to boost high school graduation rates and postsecondary enrollments, ultimately assisting young Latinos in carving out a successful career path. By implementing a college and career readiness curriculum with a national network of community-based organizations and charter schools, the Escalera Program has helped hundreds of students throughout the country reach their academic and career goals.

    “Through participation in these events, Escalera students receive an introduction to basic advocacy skills, tour the Capitol, meet with legislative leaders and their staff and visit the national monuments. Many students have never travelled outside of their home cities or states before. We believe this is an outstanding learning opportunity that rewards hardworking, committed Escalera students and broadens their horizons,” said Margaret McLeod, Ed.D., Deputy Vice President of Education and Workforce Development, NCLR.

    Late last year, NCLR partnered with D.C.-based Affiliate organization Latin American Youth Center (LAYC)—whose mission is to empower youth to achieve a successful transition to adulthood through comprehensive, innovative programs that address their social, academic and career needs—to host 32 high school students visiting D.C. through the NCLR Escalera Program. Through the Monumental Scholars project, selected LAYC students learned public speaking skills, developed research techniques and were trained in customer service, planning, coordination and team-building. The program trained young participants to serve as tour guides for visiting Escalera participants during the March convening, and they will be paid an hourly stipend.

    “We are very fortunate to have been able to partner with NCLR to provide this unique experiential learning opportunity. Participants will have the opportunity to interact with a diverse group of peers, build their leadership and public speaking skills and acquire real-life work experience,” said Ana Hageage, Director of Workforce Investment, LAYC.

    Escalera participants include students from California, Colorado, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Texas, Louisiana, Illinois, Oregon, New Mexico, Tennessee and Florida.

    Press wishing to cover any portion of the event should contact Camila Gallardo at cgallardo@nclr.org or (305) 215-4259.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:
    Julian Teixeira
    (202) 776-1812
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    During the keynote address at the 2015 NCLR (National Council of La Raza) Capital Awards gala, NCLR President and CEO Janet Murguía warned the Republican Party about the political consequences of their rhetoric and policies that are adversely affecting not only the Latino community, but the entire nation’s best interests. Below are excerpts from her speech, which you can read in full here:

    “To Speaker Boehner I have this to say: You avoided catastrophe today, but we’ve been at this for over a decade. You keep saying ‘no.’ Any attempt to resolve our broken immigration system is always ‘dead on arrival.’ No matter how much the American public supports a solution, the answer is always ‘no.’ Even when the votes in Congress are there for passage, you block it. Where is your solution? Where is your bill?”

    “There is a malignancy in the Republican Party, and it is growing. There was a time when the extreme views surrounding the immigration debate came only from the party’s extremists. Today, the extreme has become the Republican Party mainstream, and their rhetoric falls too readily from the lips of candidates at the national, state and local levels.”

    “The Republican Party’s blockade of any type of progress on immigration—whether in a bipartisan bill or the president’s executive order—sends a brutal message to our community. Make no mistake. Our complaint is not partisan. It’s personal. The Republican blockade against reform is having a searing impact on our community.”

    “We have already demonstrated that we can shake up the road to the White House. Next year we will also be looking at how our vote can impact Senate races in states such as Illinois, Ohio, Florida, Wisconsin, North Carolina and Missouri. Candidates in those states and across the country have a choice. They can continue to follow the strategy that Pete Wilson used in California to marginalize our community—with predictable results—or they can step up to help us change the course of history.”

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:

    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    On Wednesday, leaders from NCLR (National Council of La Raza), its national Affiliate Network of community-based organizations and its youth Líderes Congreso joined together to denounce the continued pursuit of an anti-immigrant agenda and attacks on President Obama’s recent executive actions on immigration. Making nearly 100 congressional visits, the wide-reaching network of Hispanic leaders vowed to work with their communities to make administrative relief a success and ensure that voters back home are keenly aware of their representatives’ actions.

    “During its short time in session, the newly elected Republican majority was quick to cave to extremists within the party, attacking immigration relief for millions of American families and reintroducing vicious anti-immigrant legislation that takes the country backward. While the vast majority of Americans support sensible immigration reform, these members of Congress have dug in on proposals that favor the extreme instead of the mainstream in America,” said Clarissa Martínez-De-Castro, Deputy Vice President, Office of Research, Advocacy and Legislation, NCLR. “We were here in the nation’s capital to make sure they know that their actions will not go unnoticed by America’s fast-growing Latino electorate.”

    More than 300 Latino leaders from throughout the country participated in the 2015 NCLR National Latino Advocacy Days. Groups representing communities in 24 states and the District of Columbia, including California, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Tennessee, engaged in sessions on public policy, advocacy and strategy to prepare for the implementation of administrative relief through Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) and the expansion of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). Many advocates also met with congressional offices to deliver a statement urging Congress to cease the obstruction of measures aimed at providing relief for millions of hardworking American families.

    “We delivered a message to our elected officials saying that what happens in Washington doesn’t stay in Washington,” said Julián Lazalde, Policy Analyst at the Latino Policy Forum in Chicago. “Latinos are following the debates in Congress and will remember who stood with us to defend executive action on immigration. We will ensure that voters in our community are well aware of who worked in favor of a solution and who simply obstructed progress.”

    An average of 2,500 Latino U.S. citizens turn 18 each day, expanding the ranks of the growing Latino electorate, whose support is crucial to win the White House and numerous other races in 2016. Latinos are a treasure trove of potential voters that politicians can ill afford to ignore. Participants committed to ensuring that the Latino electorate continues to expand and the community increases its overall engagement in policy debates.

    “As we see proposals to block the implementation of DAPA and the expansion of DACA, we want to let members of Congress know that they are picking a fight with our families,” said Krista Bustamante, Organizing Director of the Idaho Community Action Network in Boise, Idaho. “When the nation’s agenda is surrendered to a few extreme voices, as it has been in the House of Representatives, the business of the people remains undone. That is something the American people shouldn’t have to tolerate. With 62 percent of Idaho's immigrant population potentially eligible for these programs, it's crucial that Congress stop playing politics with families' hopes and dreams.”

    “One of the main reasons why I am here is that this is personal. People who are my age, my friends, will benefit from administrative action programs, and by doing so they will be able to make greater contributions to the communities where we all live,” said Cindy Zavala, a young Virginian registered voter, graduate of American University and member of the NCLR Líderes Youth Advisory Committee representing the Southeast. “I registered to vote because I believe we need to hold our elected officials accountable. I know many voters in our community are frustrated, but I also believe the most important thing those of us with the privilege to vote can do is push to stop the separation of families and raise our voices at the voting booth for those who cannot do so just yet.”

    Download pictures from the 2015 NCLR National Latino Advocacy Days here.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:

    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    Earlier today, President Obama signed the “Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act” (WIOA), legislation that lays the framework for job training and adult education services nationwide. NCLR (National Council of La Raza) applauds the bipartisan effort to pass this legislation, the first reauthorization of the Workforce Investment Act in 11 years, which will expand opportunities for Latino youth and adults by helping them attain postsecondary education and careers. Modernized features of the bill are designed to improve access to workforce development training for low-skilled workers and individuals with limited English language proficiency, while also targeting services to out-of-school youth.

    “The prosperity of the American economy is tightly linked to the success of the Latino workforce,” said Delia Pompa, Senior Vice President of Programs at NCLR. “We are pleased to see lawmakers from both sides of the aisle come together to design a better workforce development system. Now it is incumbent upon Congress to fully fund WIOA so that Latinos and other struggling workers can earn the in-demand skills and education necessary to build stronger communities and a stronger economy.”

    According to a national survey by NCLR and Latino Decisions released in December, 86 percent of Latino voters are concerned about cuts in federal funding for job training. As part of a national campaign called Latinos United for a Fair Economy, NCLR is urging Congress to remove federally imposed budget caps and replace the planned spending cuts with renewed investments in working families.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                    Contact:
    March 11, 2015                                                                                        Camila Gallardo
                                                                                                                   cgallardo@nclr.org
                                                                                                                    (305) 215-4259

    New report highlights need for policies and programs that build on resilience of young Latinos

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—At a noon forum today focused on Latino youth, Dr. Patricia Foxen, Deputy Director of Research at NCLR (National Council of La Raza), introduced her recently authored study, “Resilient Latino Youth: In Their Own Words,” which focuses on the stories of young, second-generation American Latinos who struggled to cope with poverty, discrimination or disengagement but overcame those obstacles to become productive, contributing members of society. The discussion—led by NCLR experts in Latino youth, demography and community programs—emphasized the need for policies and programs that can help Latino youth achieve greater gains in education, careers and overall quality of life.

    “Anyone familiar with the Latino community knows how remarkably resilient Hispanics are, including young Latinos,” said Janet Murguía, President and CEO, NCLR. “What we learn from this report is that while resilience is a complex, often innate quality, there is no doubt that it can also be taught or nurtured. It is therefore critical for us as a country to look at, and invest in, community and school programs and public policies that foster resilience so that these young people can achieve their full potential.”

    The report follows recent research by various organizations highlighting the hardships faced by children whose parents are undocumented and those who live in poverty in the United States. According to Foxen, while she saw resiliency in the Latino youth she interviewed, the role of community organizations and adult mentors was critical to their well-being.

    “The young people I spoke with showed a remarkable ability to overcome challenges and turn their lives around, but they all emphasized that this would have been impossible without the adults who ran after-school programs and served as mentors to them. The guidance and support that adults can provide to young people at risk is literally lifesaving, and we must make sure that youth today have that after-school program or mentor looking out for them,” Foxen said.

    NCLR experts at today’s forum concluded that five points could serve as a starting point to concentrate resources and efforts on improving opportunities for this vital segment of our population.

    1. Tap into the natural resiliency of Latino youth. Resilience traits among second-generation Latino youth include individual attributes such as optimism, perseverance, social skills, empathy and a strong willingness to give back to their communities; family and cultural traits such as responsibility and solidarity toward the extended family; and community factors such as the presence of adults and mentors who can guide and support youth in difficult environments and through the challenging moments of adolescence.

    2. Help their families escape poverty. One-third of Latino children are in poverty today; poverty tends to continue for generations and is the basis of many other problems these children experience. Their families need living wages and affordable housing.

    3. Implement policies such the “REDEEM Act,” which promotes rehabilitation rather than criminalization of youth, and reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and the Common Core State Standards so that schools will better meet the needs of Latino students and improve the graduation rate of this critical group. Latinos are graduating from high school at higher rates than in past years (73 percent), have the lowest high school dropout rate in recent history (12.7 percent) and are enrolled in higher education in record numbers (37.5 percent). Only 51 percent of Latino college students, however, will earn a bachelor’s degree within six years.

    4. Fund culturally appropriate, holistic programs that support positive youth development and mental health, reinforce learning in school and workforce skills and introduce students to new interests and technologies. For youth and families living in poor immigrant neighborhoods, community-based interventions such as the NCLR Escalera Program provide critical support to youth and their parents. Through mentoring and other programs, Escalera promotes career exploration, skills and leadership development, personal development, academic support and overall well-being.

    5. Provide mentors who can help youth become ready for a successful, productive future. “Community-based organizations like Gads Hill Center in Chicago provide critical supports to help youth overcome adversity usually rooted in poverty, discrimination, inadequate education and violent neighborhoods,” said Maricela Garcia, Chief Executive Officer, Gads Hill Center, who spoke at today’s forum. “To increase chances to build resilience, children must develop a sense of hope that comes from caring adults. The role of mentors is very powerful in the life of a child. When youth develop strong self-esteem and socioemotional competencies, they do well in school and in life.”

    The new report, “Resilient Latino Youth: In Their Own Words,” can be found at www.nclr.org.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    PARA DIVULGACIÓN INMEDIATA                                                        Contacto:
    11 de marzo de 2015                                                                               Camila Gallardo
                                                                                                                      cgallardo@nclr.org
                                                                                                                      (305) 215-4259

    Un nuevo informe destaca la necesidad de políticas y programas que construyan sobre la resiliencia de los jóvenes latinos

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—En un foro dedicado a la juventud latina que se llevó a cabo al mediodía, la Dra. Patricia Foxen, directora adjunta de investigación del NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza), presentó su estudio más reciente titulado “Resilient Latino Youth: In Their Own Words” (La resiliencia de la juventud latina: en sus propias palabras). Este estudio se enfoca en las historias de esos jóvenes hispanos de segunda generación que lidiaron con la pobreza, discriminación o desvinculación y que superaron esos obstáculos para convertirse en seres productivos que contribuyen a la sociedad. En el debate –dirigido por expertos del NCLR sobre juventud latina, demografía y programas comunitarios– se enfatizó la necesidad de políticas y programas que puedan ayudar a que los jóvenes latinos alcancen mayores logros en su educación, profesión y en la calidad de vida en general.

    “Cualquiera que esté familiarizado con la comunidad latina sabe que la capacidad de sobreponerse a situaciones límite de los hispanos es extraordinaria, incluyendo los jóvenes”, dijo Janet Murguía, presidenta y directora general del NCLR. “Lo que hemos aprendido de este informe es que la resiliencia es una cualidad compleja y frecuentemente innata, no obstante, puede enseñarse y nutrirse. Por lo tanto, es fundamental que como país cuidemos e invirtamos en programas escolares y comunitarios, así como en políticas públicas que fomenten esta cualidad para que estos jóvenes puedan aprovechar todo su potencial”.

    El informe es una continuación de una investigación reciente realizada por varias organizaciones, para destacar las dificultades que enfrentan los niños cuyos padres son indocumentados y aquellos que viven en la pobreza en los Estados Unidos. Según Foxen, aunque percibió resiliencia en los jóvenes que entrevistó, el papel de las organizaciones comunitarias y de los mentores fue fundamental para su bienestar.

    “Los jóvenes con los que hablé mostraron una capacidad extraordinaria para superar obstáculos y cambiar sus vidas. No obstante, todos enfatizaron que esto hubiera sido imposible sino hubieran podido contar con los adultos a cargo de los programas para después de la escuela y los que fueron sus mentores. La guía y el apoyo que los adultos proporcionan a los jóvenes en riesgo es literalmente un salvavidas y debemos asegurarnos de que hoy tengan esos programas de después de la escuela o mentores cuidándolos”, dijo Foxen.

    En el foro de hoy se concluyó que hay cinco puntos que podrían servir como punto de partida para concentrar los recursos y esfuerzos que se necesitan para mejorar las oportunidades para este segmento vital de nuestra población

    1. Aprovechar la resiliencia natural de la juventud latina. Los rasgos de resiliencia entre los jóvenes latinos de segunda generación incluyen atributos individuales como el optimismo, la perseverancia, las habilidades sociales, la empatía y una voluntad fuerte para retribuir a sus comunidades; los rasgos familiares y culturales como la responsabilidad y la solidaridad hacia la familia; y los factores de la comunidad como la presencia de adultos y mentores que pueden guiar y apoyar a los jóvenes en entornos difíciles y en los momentos desafiantes de la adolescencia.

    2. Ayudar a sus familias a escapar de la pobreza. Un tercio de los niños latinos vive hoy en la pobreza; la pobreza tiende a continuar por generaciones y es la base de muchos otros problemas que viven estos niños. Sus familias necesitan salarios dignos y viviendas asequibles.

    3. Implementar políticas como la "ley REDEEM", que promueve la rehabilitación de los jóvenes en lugar de la criminalización, la reautorización de la Ley de Educación Primaria y Secundaria y los Estándares Comunes del Estado para que las escuelas satisfagan mejor las necesidades de los estudiantes latinos y mejoren los índices de graduación de este grupo crítico. Hay más latinos graduándose de la preparatoria ahora que en los últimos años (73 %), tienen el índice de abandono escolar más bajo de la historia reciente (12.7 %) y están matriculándose en la escuela superior en cifras récord (37.5 %). No obstante, sólo el 51 % de los estudiantes universitarios latinos obtendrá un título universitario dentro de seis años.

    4. Un fondo culturalmente apropiado, los programas integrales que apoyen el desarrollo positivo y la salud mental de los jóvenes, reforzar el aprendizaje escolar y las habilidades de la fuerza laboral así como presentar a los estudiantes nuevos intereses y tecnologías. Para los jóvenes y las familias que viven en los barrios de inmigrantes pobres, intervenciones comunitarias, tales como el Programa Escalera del NCLR proporcionan apoyo crucial a los jóvenes y a sus padres. A través de la tutoría y de otros programas, Escalera promueve la exploración de profesiones, desarrollo de habilidades y liderazgo, desarrollo personal, apoyo académico y el bienestar general.

    5. Proporcionar mentores que puedan ayudar a que los jóvenes se preparen para un futuro exitoso y productivo. "Las organizaciones comunitarias como Gads Hill Center de Chicago proporcionan apoyo crítico para ayudar a los jóvenes a superar el infortunio radicado en la pobreza, la discriminación, la falta de educación y la violencia en los barrios", dijo Maricela García, directora ejecutiva de Gads Hill Center, que habló en el foro de hoy . "Para aumentar la posibilidad de aumentar la resiliencia, los niños deben desarrollar un sentido de esperanza que proviene de los adultos que los cuidan. El papel que juegan los tutores es muy poderoso en la vida de un niño. Cuando los jóvenes desarrollan una autoestima fuerte y aptitudes socioemocionales, les va bien en la escuela y en la vida".

    El nuevo informe, “Resilient Latino Youth: In Their Own Words,” se puede encontrar en www.nclr.org.

    El NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) es la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos y trabaja para mejorar sus oportunidades. Para más información sobre el NCLR, por favor visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                   Contact:
    April 7, 2015                                                                             Joseph Rendeiro
                                                                                                      jrendeiro@nclr.org
                                                                                                      (202) 776-1566

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—NCLR (National Council of La Raza) joined 153 civil, labor and immigrant rights groups in an amicus brief in support of two Department of Homeland Security programs that will strengthen families, national security and the economy by allowing millions of immigrants to apply for relief from deportation. The brief was one among several supporting the expansion of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA), which are currently blocked by a federal district court. Other briefs include one by 73 cities and counties in 27 states, the National League of Cities and the U.S. Conference of Mayors, and another by 181 members of Congress.

    “It is time to allow common sense to prevail. The legitimate, precedent-based actions taken by the president will bring relief to millions of American families living in fear of losing a family member to deportation, and they will strengthen our economy by having those who are working do so legally, contributing more taxes and preventing bad employers from gaming the system,” said Clarissa Martínez-De-Castro, Deputy Vice President, Office of Research, Advocacy and Legislation, NCLR. “We urge the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit to let these programs proceed and let the country start taking sensible steps to address our outdated immigration system.”

    In the brief, the groups present evidence and cases illustrating how delaying the implementation of these programs harms the nation’s economy and communities. NCLR’s Affiliate Network of nearly 300 community-based organizations—operating in 41 states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia—serves millions of Americans and immigrants annually. Through their work, they are witnessing how blocking these programs damages families and communities.

    Today’s filings are the latest legal step in Texas et al. v. United States et al. On April 17, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals will hear oral arguments in a request for emergency stay of the lower court injunction. If granted, the emergency stay would allow the U.S. government to begin implementation of DAPA and DACA expansion.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                          Contact:
    April 9, 2015                                                                                                    Camila Gallardo
                                                                                                                             cgallardo@nclr.org
                                                                                                                             (305) 215-4259

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—This week Sens. Patty Murray (D–Wash.) and Lamar Alexander (R–Tenn.) unveiled the “Every Child Achieves Act,” a bipartisan bill aimed at overhauling the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). Since its passage in 1965, ESEA has played a key role in guiding educational resources and providing support for students in the nation’s most vulnerable communities. The new proposal aims to update the current iteration of ESEA, known as No Child Left Behind, which expired in 2007.

    “While many gains have been made as a result of ESEA, including increased graduation rates among minority and lower-income students, we still have not achieved educational parity. That is why we applaud this bipartisan effort to reauthorize ESEA and make much-needed improvements to the law,” said Delia Pompa, Senior Vice President of Programs, NCLR (National Council of La Raza).

    NCLR is particularly pleased with the bill’s provisions on English learners (ELs), which strengthen accountability requirements by setting high expectations for these students in statewide plans. Moreover, the “Every Child Achieves Act” emphasizes long-term ELs and ELs with a disability, a much-needed improvement to the law.

    While NCLR applauds the improvements in the EL provisions, more needs to be done overall to maintain a robust federal role with funding attached to ambitious demands for higher achievement for all students. Our policies should ensure that all students have the opportunity to obtain an excellent and equitable education and that there are timely interventions to ensure this is happening. NCLR looks forward to working with Congress on the reauthorization of a new ESEA that will help set all of our nation’s children on a smoother path to educational success.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                   Contact:
    April 15, 2015                                                                                            Camila Gallardo
                                                                                                                       (305) 215-4259
                                                                                                                       cgallardo@nclr.org

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—Yesterday, the Task Force on New Americans issued its first report to President Obama, recommending ways that the federal government can more effectively support the successful integration of new Americans. As part of the president’s executive actions announced last November to address the nation’s broken immigration system, the Task Force was formed to recommend federal strategies that will strengthen communities and maximize the contributions of immigrants, who today represent nearly one-fifth of the U.S. labor force. The Task Force solicited input from a wide array of stakeholders, including NCLR (National Council of La Raza) and its vast Affiliate Network of nearly 300 community-based organizations throughout the United States. 

    “Questions about who, and how many, should be allowed to enter the country will always be controversial, but there should be no debate about our shared interest in rapidly and fully integrating Americans-in-waiting into our country,” said Victoria Benner, Senior Legislative Analyst, NCLR. “Our future economic prosperity, national security and social cohesion rest in part on how well we meet this challenge.”

    Among the report’s key recommendations are enhancing the capacity of the AmeriCorps VISTA program to build more welcoming communities, promoting citizenship and naturalization through public awareness campaigns and direct outreach to eligible Lawful Permanent Residents, increasing access to housing, expanding Small Business Administration tools, and increasing access to English-as-a-second-language and early learning resources. The report also commits to launching a Welcoming Communities Challenge to encourage local governments to implement tailored integration strategies for their communities.

    “We are pleased with the Task Force’s initial set of recommendations to promote the successful incorporation of millions of new immigrants into the fabric of our society, and we are anxious to see them turned into action. While federal agencies and community-based organizations stand ready to do their part, ultimately we need Congress to pass bipartisan legislation like the New American Success Act and the private sector to step up in helping our nation meet this important challenge,” concluded Benner.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                            Contact:
    April 16, 2015                                                                                     Camila Gallardo
                                                                                                               cgallardo@nclr.org
                                                                                                               (305) 215-4259

    NCLR Applauds Bipartisan Effort On Education Bill; Remains Concerned About Accountability
    New bipartisan proposal clears the Senate education committee

    WASHINGTON, D.C.— Today, the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee voted unanimously to send the “Every Child Achieves Act” to the Senate floor. NCLR (National Council of La Raza) applauds the leadership of Chairman Lamar Alexander (R–TN) and Ranking Member Patty Murray (D–WA) on their bipartisan work in moving the bill this far.

    “We are grateful for the efforts of members of Congress who have put the future of our nation’s children at the forefront of the discussion and joined together in this bipartisan effort,” said Delia Pompa, Senior Vice President of Programs, NCLR.

    While the bill’s provisions contain many necessary and positive changes to No Child Left Behind, the proposal falls short when it comes to accountability provisions. For example, the bill currently does not require states to intervene when schools fail to serve our children. History has taught us that federal safeguards are necessary in order to protect some of our nation’s most vulnerable children, including Latino students and English learners.

    “We look forward to working with the Senate in the coming days and weeks to help strengthen this legislation in a way that best protects the interests of our nation’s future—our children,” concluded Pompa.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:

    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    Yesterday, President Obama signed into law H.R. 2, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, bipartisan legislation that reauthorizes funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), among other things. Since its creation in 1997, CHIP has played a critical role in reducing the number of uninsured children nationwide. According to a Government Accountability Office report, since CHIP began, the percentage of uninsured children has decreased by half, from 13.9 percent in 1997 to 6.6 percent in the first three months of 2014. CHIP has been a particularly important lifeline for Hispanic children, who are more likely to be covered by the program than by private insurance. A recent evaluation of CHIP highlighted that in the 10 states examined, more than half of the children enrolled were Hispanic.

    “As a longstanding advocate of quality, affordable and accessible health coverage for all, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) applauds Congress for working diligently to maintain funding for this vital program and President Obama for swiftly signing the bill into law. By investing in the health and well-being of our children, we are making a critical investment in the future of our country,” said Eric Rodriguez, Vice President, Office of Research, Advocacy and Legislation, NCLR. “While we would have preferred a longer CHIP extension, we commend both parties for working together to pass this commonsense legislation. We hope that the overwhelmingly bipartisan vote in both the House of Representatives and the Senate will serve as a model moving forward on how to solve problems by working together.”

    Latino children continue to be disproportionately uninsured. In fact, they are 1.5 times more likely to be uninsured compared to all children. However, programs such as CHIP present an opportunity to further reduce this disparity. According to a report NCLR released last fall with Georgetown University, 66.1 percent of uninsured Hispanic children in the United States—or 1.3 million Hispanic children—were eligible for Medicaid or CHIP but not enrolled in 2012. Outreach to eligible families, particularly Latinos, is critical to increasing awareness of CHIP, its benefits and the fact that enrollment occurs throughout the year.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:

    Joseph Rendeiro
    jrendeiro@nclr.org
    (202) 776-1566

    For National Financial Capability Month, NCLR highlights benefits of waiting to collect Social Security

    Latinos in the United States are living longer than ever. In fact, Hispanic Americans have higher life expectancies than their Black and White counterparts. With the good fortune of living longer comes the indispensable need to prepare for a longer retirement. Social Security provides critical economic security to retirees who contribute part of their earnings to the system over their working lives. However, because about two-thirds of Latinos work for companies that do not offer a retirement plan, Latinos are more likely than other seniors to rely on Social Security as their sole source of retirement income. Eager to collect their hard-earned benefits, many workers do not realize that waiting to collect Social Security may be the best way to maximize their money.

    “One reason why Social Security is such an important piece of the puzzle when it comes to planning for retirement is that these benefits last for life. Unlike personal savings, they don’t run out,” said Eric Rodriguez, Vice President of the Office of Research, Advocacy and Legislation at NCLR (National Council of La Raza). “Unfortunately, many don’t realize that they could be getting a bigger paycheck if they simply held off on collecting Social Security for a few more years. For many Latinos who rely exclusively on Social Security to stay out of poverty, the bottom line is that waiting is worth it.”

    Every year, workers and employers pay Social Security taxes that fund the program. Working for at least 10 years will qualify a person for benefits, although workers must ensure that they are paying taxes on their paychecks, as opposed to being compensated in cash.

    Even though the full retirement age is 67, workers are allowed to begin collecting Social Security retirement benefits as early as 62. The catch is that those who collect benefits early will be penalized and have their monthly benefits reduced. In contrast, those who wait to collect will see their benefits increase up to 8 percent every year after age 62. Workers have the option to begin collecting at full retirement age or can wait until age 70 to begin collecting, boosting their monthly payments even higher. For example, a worker who makes $27,000 per year will earn a monthly benefit of $750 if he begins collecting early at age 62, $1,000 if he collects at the full retirement age of 67 or $1,320 if he waits until age 70.

    “You earned this paycheck. Don’t miss your opportunity to secure your future and your family’s future by making the most of it,” added Rodriguez.

    For more information about how to maximize your Social Security benefits, please read the NCLR brochure “It Pays to Wait” (“Vale la pena esperar”).

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    PARA DIVULGACIÓN INMEDIATA                                                                Contacto:
    21 de abril, 2015                                                                                              Joseph Rendeiro
                                                                                                                             jrendeiro@nclr.org
                                                                                                                             (202) 776-1566

    En Celebración del Mes de Capacitación Financiera, el NCLR destaca los beneficios de esperar para colectar el seguro social

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—Los latinos en los estados unidos están viviendo más años que nunca. De hecho, los latinos americanos tienen un promedio de esperanza de vida más altos que sus compañeros blancos o negros en el país. Con la buena fortuna de vivir una vida más larga también viene la necesidad de preparar para un retiro más largo. El Seguro Social provee seguridad económica crítica para los retirados quienes contribuyen parte de sus ingresos al sistema mientras que están en la fuerza laboral. A pesar de esto, el hecho de que dos tercios de los latinos trabajan para compañías que no ofrecen un plan de retiro quiere decir que los latinos son más propensos que cualquier otra persona de mayor edad a contar con el seguro social como su única fuente de ingreso. Ansiosos de poder colectar los beneficios que han ganado con el sudor de sus frentes, muchos trabajadores no se dan cuenta que esperar para colectar esos beneficios pude ser la mejor forma de maximizar su dinero.

    “Una razón por la cual el Seguro Social es una parte importante de la planificación para el retiro es que estos beneficios duran toda la vida. No son como los ahorros personales en el sentido de que nunca se agotan,” dijo Eric Rodriguez, Vice Presidente. Office of Research, Advocacy and Legislation at NCLR (National Council of La Raza). “Desafortunadamente, muchos no se dan cuenta de que podrían recibir un cheque más grande simplemente si esperan unos años más para colectar sus beneficios. Para muchos de los latinos que cuentan exclusivamente con los beneficios del Seguro Social para evitar la pobreza, la verdad es que vale esperar.”

    Cada año, trabajadores y empleadores pagan impuestos al Seguro Social que son la fuente de ingreso para el programa. Los que trabajan un mínimo de diez años califican para beneficios, aunque los trabajadores tienen que asegurarse que están pagando impuestos en sus cheques de sueldo al contrario de ser pagados en efectivo.

    A pesar de que la edad de retiro es 67 años, los trabajadores son permitidos empezar a colectar beneficios a los 62. Aquellos que colectan más temprano serán penalizados y sus beneficios mensuales serán reducidos. Al contrario, aquellos quienes esperan para colectar el Seguro Social verán un incremento a sus beneficios de hasta un 8 por ciento cada años que esperan después de los 62. Los trabajadores tienen la opción de empezar a colectar para la edad de retiro, o pueden esperan hasta los 70 para recibir aún más beneficios. Por ejemplo, un trabajador que gana $27,000 por año recibirá beneficios de $750 si empieza a recibir esos beneficios a los 62, $1,000 si espera a los 67 años y $1,320 si espera hasta los 70.

    “Usted se lo ganó. No pierda la oportunidad de asegurar a su futuro y la de su familia,” añadió Rodriguez.

    Para más información de cómo maximizar a sus beneficios de Seguro Social, por favor lea el siguiente boletín informativo “It Pays to Wait” (“Vale la pena esperar”).

    El NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) es la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos y trabaja para mejorar sus oportunidades. Para más información sobre el NCLR, por favor visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                        Contact:
    April 22, 2015                                                                               Catherine Brady
                                                                                                        (617) 945-9316;catherine@jpa.com
                                                                                                        Kathy Mimberg
                                                                                                        (202) 776-1714; kmimberg@nclr.org


    NCLR and Peers for Progress Release Comprehensive Guides to Implementing Peer Support Programs

    Leawood, KS - Peers for Progress, a program of the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation, and the National Council of La Raza (NCLR) announced the release of two essential guides to enable accelerated implementation and scale-up of peer support programs in order to meet global healthcare challenges.

    The Peers for Progress Program Development Guide, is a comprehensive practical handbook representing the culmination of six years of intensive study and reporting by community health leaders across the globe. The guide serves as resource for potential and existing peer support program managers, providing step-by-step instruction on program planning, monitoring and evaluation, quality improvement, and sustainability. Healthcare providers and community leaders seeking to implement peer support programs will also find supporting documentation for their efforts in the form of a recently completed economic analysis report, which demonstrates the cost-effectiveness of implementing these programs and suggests an innovative payment model for peer support.

    “We are very excited to introduce the Peers for Progress Program Development Guide, which offers a menu of good practices and how-to resources for the healthcare community,” said Edwin B. Fisher, global director of Peers for Progress. “Existing program directors will benefit from the guidance on how to create and maintain the necessary frameworks for successful programs, and new managers will find the tools they need to demonstrate the real-world application of peer support programs in a variety of community settings.”

    The second resource, Mi Salud es Primero: A Model for Implementing a Promotores de Salud Program for Diabetes Self-Management in a Primary Care Setting, outlines an ideal design and implementation of a peer support program that could meet the needs of Spanish-speaking communities, which are often underserved and disproportionately affected by chronic illnesses such as diabetes. The guide draws on research from the Mi Salud es Primero/My Health Comes First program, targeted to urban, low-income primarily Latino adults with type 2 diabetes in Chicago, Illinois, which integrated promotores de salud or community health workers in a primary care setting.

    “NCLR finds that working with promotores de salud is highly effective in providing Latinos with the peer support they need to learn to eat healthier foods, exercise in a way that fits into their daily routines, and better follow their doctors’ instructions. These community health workers truly understand the challenges facing Latino patients and are able to share information in a way that is culturally and linguistically appropriate” said A. Manuela McDonough, Associate Director, Institute for Hispanic Health, NCLR.

    Together with legacy data from the global studies, the Peers for Progress and NCLR guides strongly illustrate the crucial role peer support programming plays in closing gaps in healthcare.

    Copies of the guides may also be ordered by contacting info@peersforprogress.org or news@nclr.org.

    ###

    About Peers for Progress
    A program of the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation, Peers for Progress is dedicated to promoting peer support in health, health care and prevention around the world. Through research, collaborative sharing of program and quality improvement resources, and supporting advocacy, it seeks to help the thousands of peer support programs around the world learn from each other, improve the services they offer, gain greater recognition of their work, and achieve integration of peer support as a normal, widely available component of high-quality health care. Peers for Progress is supported by grants from the Eli Lilly and Company Foundation and the Bristol Myers Squibb Foundation’s Together on Diabetes Initiative. For more information on Peers for Progress, visit www.peersforprogress.org, or follow us on Twitter at @peers4progress.

    About the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation
    The Foundation serves as the philanthropic arm of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Its primary mission is to advance the values of family medicine by promoting humanitarian, educational, and scientific initiatives that improve the health of all people.

    For more information, please visit www.aafpfoundation.org.

    About the National Council of La Raza (NCLR)
    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org, or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                     Contact:
    April 22, 2015                                                                                              Julian Teixeira
                                                                                                                         jteixeira@nclr.org
                                                                                                                         (202) 776-1812

    ORLANDO, Fla.—Today, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) announced the selection of Orlando, Fla., as the host of the 2016 NCLR Annual Conference and National Latino Family Expo®. The NCLR Annual Conference is the nation’s largest annual gathering of leaders, advocates, elected officials, business executives and change-makers whose work impacts the Latino community. The National Latino Family Expo is one of the largest events in the country focused on resources and activities for the Latino family, averaging 200 exhibitors showcasing their products and services. With live entertainment, giveaways, free health screenings, and cooking and exercise demonstrations, every year the Conference offers attendees something new in a fun, exciting, family-friendly environment.

    “We are excited to host NCLR’s signature events, our Annual Conference and National Latino Family Expo, in such a dynamic and diverse city as Orlando, Florida. Latinos have not only helped contribute to the economic growth and diversity of the city and its surrounding areas, they have become an increasingly sought-after electorate by those seeking to win statewide or national office in what’s considered the ultimate swing state,” said Janet Murguía, NCLR President and CEO. “As we enter into an important election year, Orlando is an ideal place to gather our nation’s Latino leaders and community members to both discuss key issues and ensure that our nation’s leaders are aware that our community is paying attention to how they engage us on those issues,” concluded Murguía.

    Orlando is an ideal city to host the annual gathering of Latino leaders, policymakers and community members; according to the Pew Hispanic Center, Orlando’s Latino population grew by 83 percent between 2000 and 2010. Latino contributions to the city’s economy, culture and political landscape have been significant—a recent Nielsen report indicated the city is home to the nation’s fourth fastest-growing Latino market and the area is a coveted one for those running for national and statewide office. A rapidly expanding Latino electorate in the I-4 Corridor, which includes the city of Orlando, has had a significant impact on determining election outcomes over the past two decades.


    The Annual Conference will take place July 23–26 at the Orlando Convention Center, located at 9800 International Drive, Orlando, FL 32819.

    For additional information, please contact Julian Teixeira, Director of Communications, NCLR, at jteixeira@nclr.org.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

    ###


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    Volunteers from 16 local NCLR Affiliates will participate in projects across the country

    WASHINGTON, DC, April 23, 2015 –NCLR (The National Council of La Raza) and Comcast NBCUniversal will team up on Saturday, April 25 to make change happen at projects across the country as part of Comcast Cares Day, Comcast’s companywide celebration of their year-round commitment to volunteerism. Together, NCLR and Comcast NBCUniversal volunteers will work on 16 projects with local NCLR community organizations.

    This is the ninth consecutive year that NCLR, the nation’s largest Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization, has partnered with Comcast NBCUniversal on Comcast Cares Day projects. They range from painting classrooms to expanding community gardens, and are part of more than 750 Comcast Cares Day projects throughout the country that will draw more than 90,000 volunteers. NCLR volunteers will join Comcast employees, families, friends and other community partners at projects including:

    • Houston Elementary School in Washington, D.C., where volunteers from CentroNia, the Latin American Youth Center (LAYC), and many other community organizations will come together to paint murals, plant flowers and plants, and build and plant vegetable gardens at the school.
    • Congreso de Latinos Unidos in Philadelphia, PA, where volunteers will transform the organization’s campus by expanding a community garden, cleaning the surrounding area and brightening up the children’s playground by giving it a fresh coat of paint.
    • Miraflores Housing Complex in Portland, OR, where volunteers will work with the Hacienda Community Development Corporation to beautify a community room that hosts an after-school program for students in a complex that provides affordable housing and support for victims of domestic violence. 

    “NCLR and Comcast have partnered together for nearly a decade on our commitment to families and communities throughout our nation,” said Janet Murguía, NCLR President and CEO, NCLR. “Thanks to Comcast’s ongoing support, our network of Affiliates can continue their incredible work and continue to participate once again in Comcast Cares Day and in helping to make a difference in the lives of America’s 55 million Hispanics.” 

    “One reason we’re able to accomplish so much on Comcast Cares Day is because of the partnerships we have with community organizations,” said David L. Cohen, Executive Vice President of Comcast Corporation and chair of the NCLR Corporate Board of Advisors. “NCLR and its affiliates make perfect partners for us, as we both share a commitment to provide opportunities that improve the lives of Hispanics in the thousands of communities we serve around the country.”

    Comcast NBCUniversal and NCLR have enjoyed a long partnership that addresses the needs of the Hispanic community. Comcast NBCUniversal recently served as broadcast partners for NCLR’s ALMA Awards in October 2014, supporting programming on multiple platforms, including a live telecast on MSNBC and NBC UNIVERSO.

    About the NCLR
    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

    About the Comcast Foundation
    The Comcast Foundation was founded by Comcast Corporation in June 1999 to provide charitable support to qualified non-profit organizations. The Foundation primarily invests in programs intended to have a positive, sustainable impact on their communities. The Foundation has three community investment priorities—promoting service, expanding digital literacy, and building tomorrow’s leaders. Since its inception, the Comcast Foundation has donated nearly $158 million to organizations in the communities nationwide that Comcast serves. More information about the Foundation and its programs is available at www.comcast.com/community.

    About Comcast Corporation
    Comcast Corporation
    (Nasdaq: CMCSA, CMCSK) is a global media and technology company with two primary businesses, Comcast Cable and NBCUniversal. Comcast Cable is the nation's largest video, high-speed Internet and phone provider to residential customers under the XFINITY brand and also provides these services to businesses. NBCUniversal operates news, entertainment and sports cable networks, the NBC and Telemundo broadcast networks, television production operations, television station groups, Universal Pictures and Universal Parks and Resorts. Visit www.comcastcorporation.com for more information.

    # # #

    Media Contacts
    Julian Teixeira, Senior Director, Communications, NCLR
    jteixeira@nclr.org
    or (202) 776-1812

    Katie Lubenow, Director, Corporate Communications, Comcast
    Katie_Lubenow@comcast.com
    or (215) 286-5691


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                     Contact:
    April 22, 2015                                                                                              Julian Teixeira
                                                                                                                         jteixeira@nclr.org
                                                                                                                         (202) 776-1812

    ORLANDO, Fla.—Today, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) announced the selection of Orlando, Fla., as the host of the 2016 NCLR Annual Conference and National Latino Family Expo®. The NCLR Annual Conference is the nation’s largest annual gathering of leaders, advocates, elected officials, business executives and change-makers whose work impacts the Latino community. The National Latino Family Expo is one of the largest events in the country focused on resources and activities for the Latino family, averaging 200 exhibitors showcasing their products and services. With live entertainment, giveaways, free health screenings, and cooking and exercise demonstrations, every year the Conference offers attendees something new in a fun, exciting, family-friendly environment.

    “We are excited to host NCLR’s signature events, our Annual Conference and National Latino Family Expo, in such a dynamic and diverse city as Orlando, Florida. Latinos have not only helped contribute to the economic growth and diversity of the city and its surrounding areas, they have become an increasingly sought-after electorate by those seeking to win statewide or national office in what’s considered the ultimate swing state,” said Janet Murguía, NCLR President and CEO. “As we enter into an important election year, Orlando is an ideal place to gather our nation’s Latino leaders and community members to both discuss key issues and ensure that our nation’s leaders are aware that our community is paying attention to how they engage us on those issues,” concluded Murguía.

    Orlando is an ideal city to host the annual gathering of Latino leaders, policymakers and community members; according to the Pew Hispanic Center, Orlando’s Latino population grew by 83 percent between 2000 and 2010. Latino contributions to the city’s economy, culture and political landscape have been significant—a recent Nielsen report indicated the city is home to the nation’s fourth fastest-growing Latino market and the area is a coveted one for those running for national and statewide office. A rapidly expanding Latino electorate in the I-4 Corridor, which includes the city of Orlando, has had a significant impact on determining election outcomes over the past two decades.


    The Annual Conference will take place July 23–26 at the Orlando Convention Center, located at 9800 International Drive, Orlando, FL 32819.

    For additional information, please contact Julian Teixeira, Director of Communications, NCLR, at jteixeira@nclr.org.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

    ###


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    Volunteers from 16 local NCLR Affiliates will participate in projects across the country

    WASHINGTON, DC, April 23, 2015 –NCLR (The National Council of La Raza) and Comcast NBCUniversal will team up on Saturday, April 25 to make change happen at projects across the country as part of Comcast Cares Day, Comcast’s companywide celebration of their year-round commitment to volunteerism. Together, NCLR and Comcast NBCUniversal volunteers will work on 16 projects with local NCLR community organizations.

    This is the ninth consecutive year that NCLR, the nation’s largest Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization, has partnered with Comcast NBCUniversal on Comcast Cares Day projects. They range from painting classrooms to expanding community gardens, and are part of more than 750 Comcast Cares Day projects throughout the country that will draw more than 90,000 volunteers. NCLR volunteers will join Comcast employees, families, friends and other community partners at projects including:

    • Houston Elementary School in Washington, D.C., where volunteers from CentroNia, the Latin American Youth Center (LAYC), and many other community organizations will come together to paint murals, plant flowers and plants, and build and plant vegetable gardens at the school.
    • Congreso de Latinos Unidos in Philadelphia, PA, where volunteers will transform the organization’s campus by expanding a community garden, cleaning the surrounding area and brightening up the children’s playground by giving it a fresh coat of paint.
    • Miraflores Housing Complex in Portland, OR, where volunteers will work with the Hacienda Community Development Corporation to beautify a community room that hosts an after-school program for students in a complex that provides affordable housing and support for victims of domestic violence. 

    “NCLR and Comcast have partnered together for nearly a decade on our commitment to families and communities throughout our nation,” said Janet Murguía, NCLR President and CEO, NCLR. “Thanks to Comcast’s ongoing support, our network of Affiliates can continue their incredible work and continue to participate once again in Comcast Cares Day and in helping to make a difference in the lives of America’s 55 million Hispanics.” 

    “One reason we’re able to accomplish so much on Comcast Cares Day is because of the partnerships we have with community organizations,” said David L. Cohen, Executive Vice President of Comcast Corporation and chair of the NCLR Corporate Board of Advisors. “NCLR and its affiliates make perfect partners for us, as we both share a commitment to provide opportunities that improve the lives of Hispanics in the thousands of communities we serve around the country.”

    Comcast NBCUniversal and NCLR have enjoyed a long partnership that addresses the needs of the Hispanic community. Comcast NBCUniversal recently served as broadcast partners for NCLR’s ALMA Awards in October 2014, supporting programming on multiple platforms, including a live telecast on MSNBC and NBC UNIVERSO.

    About the NCLR
    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

    About the Comcast Foundation
    The Comcast Foundation was founded by Comcast Corporation in June 1999 to provide charitable support to qualified non-profit organizations. The Foundation primarily invests in programs intended to have a positive, sustainable impact on their communities. The Foundation has three community investment priorities—promoting service, expanding digital literacy, and building tomorrow’s leaders. Since its inception, the Comcast Foundation has donated nearly $158 million to organizations in the communities nationwide that Comcast serves. More information about the Foundation and its programs is available at www.comcast.com/community.

    About Comcast Corporation
    Comcast Corporation
    (Nasdaq: CMCSA, CMCSK) is a global media and technology company with two primary businesses, Comcast Cable and NBCUniversal. Comcast Cable is the nation's largest video, high-speed Internet and phone provider to residential customers under the XFINITY brand and also provides these services to businesses. NBCUniversal operates news, entertainment and sports cable networks, the NBC and Telemundo broadcast networks, television production operations, television station groups, Universal Pictures and Universal Parks and Resorts. Visit www.comcastcorporation.com for more information.

    # # #

    Media Contacts
    Julian Teixeira, Senior Director, Communications, NCLR
    jteixeira@nclr.org
    or (202) 776-1812

    Katie Lubenow, Director, Corporate Communications, Comcast
    Katie_Lubenow@comcast.com
    or (215) 286-5691


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                           Contact:
    April 28, 2015                                                                                   Julian Teixeira
                                                                                                              (202) 776-1812
                                                                                                              jteixeira@nclr.org

    NCLR to release new report, “Enhancing Latino Retirement Readiness in California”

    LOS ANGELES—Our nation faces a looming retirement crisis. More than half of all working-age Americans are unprepared for a financially secure retirement. Latinos, who are projected to account for most of the growth in the American workforce between 2010 and 2050, make up more than half of the seven million Californians who work for employers that do not offer a retirement plan.

    California is currently designing a statewide retirement savings program for people who do not have a retirement plan at work, the largest share of whom is Latino. Join NCLR (National Council of La Raza) for a panel discussion about the findings of a new report that examines how California’s bold approach to employer-based retirement savings plans could improve Latino retirement readiness and the retirement outlook for the nation as a whole.

    To attend the event, please contact Julian Teixeira, Senior Director of Communications, at jteixeira@nclr.org or (202) 776-1812.

    MEDIA ADVISORY

    WHAT:    Panel discussion on “Enhancing Latino Retirement Readiness in California”

    WHO:      Moderator
                   Carmen Rita Wong, President and Founder, Malecon Productions, and co-creator and former host of CNBC’s “On the Money”

                   Welcoming Remarks
                   Lata Reddy, Vice President, Corporate Social Responsibility, Prudential Financial, and President, Prudential Foundation

                   Panelists
                   Delia de la Vara, Vice President, California Region, NCLR
                   Harry Dalessio, Vice President, Sales and Strategic Relationships, Prudential Retirement
                   Maggie Cervantes, Executive Director, NEW Economics for Women
                   
    WHEN:    May 6, 2015, 11:00 a.m.

    WHERE:  NEW Economics for Women
                    303 S. Loma Drive
                    Los Angeles, CA 90017

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

    The Prudential Foundation is a nonprofit corporation supported by The Prudential Insurance Company of America, an insurance subsidiary of Prudential Financial Inc. of the U.S. The Prudential Foundation advocates for systemic change focused on eliminating barriers to financial and social mobility in the areas of meeting basic needs, connecting people to quality jobs, building personal assets and transforming communities. As a strategic investor, the Foundation makes long-term commitments that yield tangible results through both grants and program-related investments.

    For more information, please visit www.news.prudential.com or follow us @prudentialnews or @prudentialbyc.

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    PARA DIVULGACIÓN INMEDIATA                                                  Contacto
    29 de abril de 2015                                                                             Julián Teixeira
                                                                                                               (202) 776-1812
                                                                                                                jteixeira@nclr.org

    NCLR publica un nuevo informe:“Cómo Preparar Mejor a los Latinos que se Jubilan en California”

    LOS ANGELES—Nuestra nación enfrenta una crisis inminente relacionada con la jubilación. Más de la mitad de todos los estadounidenses que trabajan en la actualidad no están preparados para tener una jubilación que sea financieramente segura. Los latinos, que conforman la mayor parte del crecimiento de la fuerza laboral entre 2010 y 2050, representan más de la mitad de los siete millones de californianos que trabajan para empleadores que no ofrecen ningún plan de jubilación.

    California está diseñando, a nivel estatal, un programa de ahorros para la jubilación de aquellas personas que no tienen un plan de retiro en su trabajo y la mayor parte de esas personas son de origen latino. Únase a NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) para participar en una mesa redonda durante la cual se tratarán las conclusiones de un nuevo informe que examina en un audaz enfoque los planes de ahorro de los empleadores de California y la forma cómo se podría mejorar la jubilación de los hispanos y las perspectivas de jubilación para toda la nación.

    Para asistir al evento, póngase en contacto con Julián Teixeira, Director Sénior de Comunicaciones, en jteixeira@nclr.org o (202) 776-1812.

    AVISO A LOS MEDIOS DE COMUNICACIÓN

    TEMA:           Mesa redonda: “Cómo Preparar Mejor a los Latinos que se Jubilan en California”

    PRESENTACIONES:

                          Moderadora
                          Carmen Rita Wong, Presidenta y Fundadora, Malecon Productions, y coproductora y ex presentadora de “On the Money” en CNBC

                          Palabras de Bienvenida
                          Lata Reddy, Vicepresidenta, Responsabilidad Social Corporativa y Presidenta de Prudential Foundation

                          Panelistas
                          Delia de la Vara, Vicepresidenta, Región de California, NCLR
                          Harry Dalessio, Vicepresidente, Ventas y Relaciones Estratégicas, Prudential Retirement
                          Maggie Cervantes, Directora Ejecutiva, NEW Economics for Women

    FECHA:         6 de mayo de 2015, 11:00 a.m.

    LUGAR:         NEW Economics for Women
                          303 S. Loma Drive
                          Los Angeles, CA 90017

    El Consejo Nacional de La Raza (NCLR, por sus siglas en inglés) –la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos– trabaja para mejorar las oportunidades de los estadounidenses hispanos. Para más información sobre NCLR, visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

    Prudential Foundation es una corporación sin fines de lucro que opera con el apoyo de The Prudential Insurance Company of America, una filial de seguros de Prudential Financial Inc. of the U.S. La Fundación se aboca al cambio sistémico cuya meta es eliminar las barreras de mobilidad socio-económica en las áreas para satisfacer necesidades básicas, conectando la gente a empleos de calidad, promover las reservas de bienes personales y transformar comunidades. Como un inversor estratégico, la Fundación promueve compromisos a largo plazo que producen resultados tangibles a través de donaciones e inversiones vinculadas a sus programas.

    Para mayor información, visite www.news.prudential.com o síganos en @prudentialnews o @prudentialbyc.

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