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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                 Contact:
    April 30, 2015                                                                                         Camila Gallardo
                                                                                                                   cgallardo@nclr.org
                                                                                                                   (305) 215-4259

    Capitol Hill briefing highlights community services and programs that strengthen the ability of young Latinos to turn their lives around

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—At a Capitol Hill briefing today, a panel of experts on at-risk youth convened by NCLR (National Council of La Raza) with Rep. Tony Cardenas (D–Calif.) expressed urgency for more community programs that prevent youth from entering the juvenile justice system and provide effective alternatives to incarceration. Fernando Pizarro, National Correspondent for Univision News, served as moderator and was joined by Dr. Patricia Foxen, Deputy Director of Research, NCLR; Maricela Garcia, CEO of Chicago-based community organization Gads Hill Center; Jeff Fleischer, CEO of Youth Advocate Programs; and Geovany Posadas of the Latin American Youth Center.

    The discussion emphasized successful strategies for developing resilient Latino youth and reducing the disproportionate number of young Hispanics in the juvenile justice system. Among the overall youth population of the United States, Latinos make up 19 percent of all 10- to 17-year-olds, yet they represent 25 percent of youth who are incarcerated. On any given day, at least 18,000 Hispanic youth are incarcerated in the United States for mostly nonviolent offenses. For many youth who enter the juvenile justice system, breaking the cycle of recidivism is incredibly difficult. The speakers agreed that ending the school-to-prison pipeline is possible with effective programs and policies that support youth development, prevention services and alternatives to incarceration.

    “There’s no question that kids are resilient, but right now the resources kids need in order to be better and succeed are tied up in the system. We need to redirect dollars spent on incarcerating kids back to their communities so we can support young people and their families to succeed in the contexts of their homes and neighborhoods,” said Fleischer.

    Foxen recounted the findings of her recently released report, “Resilient Latino Youth: In Their Own Words,” which focuses on young, second-generation American Latinos who struggled to cope with poverty, discrimination or disengagement but overcame those obstacles to become productive members of society. Her research took place at Hispanic-serving community organizations such as Gads Hill Center, where Latino youth connect with adult mentors and participate in skills sessions and other activities that can help them avoid prison.

    “I learned from this research that resilience can be nurtured in the most adverse of situations. The young people I spoke with—all children of immigrants—demonstrated many strengths, but all credited community-based programs and mentors as helping them overcome challenges that would have otherwise been impossible. Instead of continually expanding our juvenile justice population, we must support policies and comprehensive programs that build on the strengths of young Latinos and their families, and help these youth turn their lives around,” Foxen said.

    NCLR has called on Congress to reauthorize the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act to end decades of so-called “tough-on-crime” policies. Any reauthorization should also include Rep. Cardenas’s “Prohibiting Detention of Youth Status Offenders Act” to end youth incarceration for noncriminal offenses, and implement policies such as the “REDEEM Act,” introduced by Sens. Cory Booker (D–N.J.) and Rand Paul (R–Ky.) to promote rehabilitation rather than criminalization of youth. Strengthening our education system can also play a crucial role in youth resilience; NCLR continues to work with members of Congress to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and implement the Common Core State Standards in a number of states so that schools will better prepare Latino students for higher education and the workplace.

    At the community level, NCLR supports culturally appropriate, holistic programs that encourage positive youth development and mental health, reinforce workforce skills and learning in school and introduce students to new interests and technologies. For youth and families living in mixed-status families or poor neighborhoods, community-based interventions such as the NCLR Escalera Program provide critical support to youth and their parents. Through mentoring and other programs, Escalera promotes career exploration, skills and leadership development, personal development, academic support and overall well-being.

    “Community-based organizations like Gads Hill Center in Chicago provide critical support to help youth overcome adversity. To increase chances to build resilience, children must develop a sense of hope that comes from caring adults. The role of mentors is very powerful in the life of a child. When youth develop strong self-esteem and socioemotional competencies, they do well in school and in life,” said Garcia.

    NCLR’s recently released report, “Resilient Latino Youth: In Their Own Words,” can be found at www.nclr.org.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:

    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    Today, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) applauded Senator Patty Murray (D–Wash.) and Representative Bobby Scott (D–Va.) for introducing the “Raise the Wage Act,” which would raise the federal minimum wage to $12 per hour by 2020. According to an analysis by the Economic Policy Institute, 40 percent of Latino workers would see a pay increase if the legislation were enacted.

    “While the Latino employment rate has bounced back since the recession, low wages keep far too many working families struggling to cover their basic expenses,” said Eric Rodriguez, Vice President of the Office of Research, Advocacy and Legislation at NCLR. “In the 2014 elections, raising the minimum wage was a top priority for Latino voters, as evidenced by their strong support for wage hikes in four states and several cities. This bill responds to voters’ call by setting a meaningful floor on what workers can be paid.”

    A 2014 election eve poll found that 78 percent of Latinos supported raising the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $10.10 per hour, a proposal that failed to advance in the previous Congress. The rationale for the $12 wage proposed by the “Raise the Wage Act” is that it is 10 percent higher than the peak value of the minimum wage, which occurred in 1986, a time when workers were less educated and less productive than today’s workers. The “Raise the Wage Act” builds in automatic increases to the wage starting in 2021 to keep up with the rising cost of living.

    The bill also gradually phases out the sub-minimum wage for tipped workers, who have earned just $2.13 per hour since 1991. Tipped workers are predominantly women of color, including Latinas, and are concentrated in the restaurant industry. Restaurant work is one of the fastest-growing industries in the U.S. economy.

    “NCLR is proud to support this legislation, which refuses to perpetuate the historical indignity that imposed a double standard on tipped workers and their families,” concluded Rodriguez. “It is time for policymakers to understand that a strong economic agenda must include raising the minimum wage.”

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:

     Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    Two years ago today, the Obama administration began implementation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, an initiative to grant temporary relief to undocumented youth who have grown up in the United States. Despite ongoing attacks from anti-immigrant extremists, the program—which has approved more than half a million applicants on a case-by-case basis—retains the support of the majority of Americans.

    “Over the past two years, DACA has had resounding success, enabling hundreds of thousands of DREAMers to continue pursuing their educational and professional ambitions without the fear of deportation,” said Janet Murguía, President and CEO of NCLR (National Council of La Raza). “For these hardworking young people who have grown up in the United States, attending school and working in this country, DACA has kept the promise of the American Dream alive and has allowed our nation to fully benefit from their talents and contributions.”

    “When the president chose to use his executive authority two years ago, it was in the face of obstinacy from lawmakers in Congress who refused to pass the DREAM Act,” Murguía continued. “As the recent shameful set of votes in the House of Representatives indicates, we are again at a similar impasse on Capitol Hill, with these same lawmakers now digging in their heels as opposed to working toward a solution to fix our broken immigration system. Now more than ever, we need President Obama to exercise a legitimate use of his executive authority to expand relief and limit senseless deportations in order to keep hardworking aspiring Americans together with their families.”

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    PARA DIVULGACIÓN INMEDIATA

    Contacto:

    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    Hoy hace dos años que la administración Obama empezó con la implementación del programa Acción Diferida para los Jóvenes Llegados en la Infancia (DACA, por sus siglas en inglés), una iniciativa que otorga protección temporal a los jóvenes indocumentados que han crecido en este país. A pesar de los continuos ataques de los extremistas antiinmigrantes, el programa –que ha aprobado caso por caso a más de medio millón de solicitantes– tiene el apoyo de la mayoría de los estadounidenses.

    “En los últimos dos años, DACA ha sido un rotundo éxito, permitiendo que cientos de miles de jóvenes continúen estudiando y persiguiendo sus sueños profesionales sin miedo a ser deportados”, dijo Janet Murguía, presidenta y directora general del NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza). “Para estos jóvenes trabajadores que han crecido en Estados Unidos, asistiendo a la escuela y trabajando en este país, DACA ha mantenido viva la promesa del sueño americano y ha permitido que nuestro país se beneficie completamente de su talento y aportaciones”.

    “Cuando el presidente utilizó su poder ejecutivo hace dos años, fue frente a la obstinación de los legisladores del Congreso que rechazaron la autorización de la Ley DREAM”, continuó Murguía. “Como muestra la vergonzosa votación reciente en la Cámara de Representantes, estamos de nuevo en un callejón sin salida en el Capitolio, con los mismos legisladores intransigentes oponiéndose a trabajar por una solución que arregle nuestro sistema disfuncional de inmigración. Ahora más que nunca, necesitamos que el presidente Obama ejercite su poder ejecutivo para ampliar la ayuda y limitar las deportaciones innecesarias para que estos estadounidenses trabajadores y con aspiraciones, se queden con sus familias”.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                Contact(s):

    August 19, 2014                                                                               Camila Gallardo, NCLR
                                                                                                                cgallardo@nclr.org
                                                                                                                (305) 215-4259
                                                                                                                Michael Vela, San Antonio Hispanic
                                                                                                                Chamber of Commerce
                                                                                                                michaelv@sahcc.org
                                                                                                                210-208-8208; 210-884-1377                                                                             

                                    

    TEXAS’ REJECTION OF MEDICAID EXPANSION LEAVES STATE’S FAMILIES, ECONOMY VULNERABLE
    Report highlights missed economic opportunities and impact of lack of health coverage on Latinos in the state

    SAN ANTONIO—Today, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) and the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce held an afternoon press conference to announce the findings of the NCLR report, “Closing the Health Care Coverage Gap in Texas: A Latino Perspective.” The report details the negative impact of not expanding Medicaid in Texas, particularly its effects on Latinos, who represent 50 percent of the state’s uninsured.

    Texas is home to the nation’s highest population of uninsured Americans; nearly one quarter of the state lacked coverage in 2012. While the Affordable Care Act is helping to close the insurance coverage gap by offering affordable plans through the Health Insurance Marketplace, the state of Texas has chosen to reject federal aid to help expand eligibility for the Medicaid program, even though the funding would have fully covered the first three years of the program’s expansion. Already, eligibility for Medicaid in the state of Texas ranks among the most restrictive in the country: To qualify, a working family of four must make less than $4,500 in yearly income.

    According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, nearly 600,000 Hispanics who would have otherwise qualified for Medicaid will be denied coverage as a result of the state’s rejection of federal funding to help expand the program’s eligibility requirements. Given the statistically higher rate of chronic diseases among Latinos, that population is particularly vulnerable to the effects of the coverage gap. Supporters of Medicaid expansion include a cross-section of health, community and business leaders. As a recent poll conducted by the Texas Hospital Association demonstrated, 54 percent of Texas voters believe the state should expand health coverage, while 60 percent favored Medicaid expansion after learning it would be fully funded for the first three years by the federal government

    “Despite broad public support and the clear economic benefits of Medicaid expansion—including an estimated boost in the state’s economic output by $67.9 billion during fiscal years 2014–2017 and generating an additional 231,000 jobs in Texas by 2016—the state of Texas has chosen to reject federal funding to expand the program and has yet to bring forth a viable alternative to bridge the coverage gap,” said Leticia de la Vara, Senior Strategist, NCLR. “It is unacceptable that our most vulnerable populations and the very workers we count on to stimulate the state’s economic engine lack the critical coverage that they need to remain healthy,” continued de la Vara.

    “It’s time to take a step in the right direction and expand access to care for more Texans; it’s the right thing to do to move Texas forward,” said Ramiro Cavazos, President and CEO of the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. “Expanding access to health care will help create robust communities, allowing opportunities to reduce incidences of persistent health concerns.”


    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

    The San Antonio Hispanic Chamber of Commerce is San Antonio’s leading resource and advocate for Hispanic businesses, Hispanics in business, and provides premiere access to the Hispanic market. Founded in 1929, the Hispanic Chamber’s mission is to help small businesses grow, expand international trade, raise educational levels, develop new leaders and represent the interests of the growing Hispanic community. For more information on the San Antonio Hispanic Chamber, please visit www.sahcc.org.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                           Contact:
    April 28, 2015                                                                                   Julian Teixeira
                                                                                                              (202) 776-1812
                                                                                                              jteixeira@nclr.org

    NCLR to release new report, “Enhancing Latino Retirement Readiness in California”

    LOS ANGELES—Our nation faces a looming retirement crisis. More than half of all working-age Americans are unprepared for a financially secure retirement. Latinos, who are projected to account for most of the growth in the American workforce between 2010 and 2050, make up more than half of the seven million Californians who work for employers that do not offer a retirement plan.

    California is currently designing a statewide retirement savings program for people who do not have a retirement plan at work, the largest share of whom is Latino. Join NCLR (National Council of La Raza) for a panel discussion about the findings of a new report that examines how California’s bold approach to employer-based retirement savings plans could improve Latino retirement readiness and the retirement outlook for the nation as a whole.

    To attend the event, please contact Julian Teixeira, Senior Director of Communications, at jteixeira@nclr.org or (202) 776-1812.

    MEDIA ADVISORY

    WHAT:    Panel discussion on “Enhancing Latino Retirement Readiness in California”

    WHO:      Moderator
                   Carmen Rita Wong, President and Founder, Malecon Productions, and co-creator and former host of CNBC’s “On the Money”

                   Welcoming Remarks
                   Lata Reddy, Vice President, Corporate Social Responsibility, Prudential Financial, and President, Prudential Foundation

                   Panelists
                   Delia de la Vara, Vice President, California Region, NCLR
                   Harry Dalessio, Vice President, Sales and Strategic Relationships, Prudential Retirement
                   Maggie Cervantes, Executive Director, NEW Economics for Women
                   
    WHEN:    May 6, 2015, 11:00 a.m.

    WHERE:  NEW Economics for Women
                    303 S. Loma Drive
                    Los Angeles, CA 90017

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

    The Prudential Foundation is a nonprofit corporation supported by The Prudential Insurance Company of America, an insurance subsidiary of Prudential Financial Inc. of the U.S. The Prudential Foundation advocates for systemic change focused on eliminating barriers to financial and social mobility in the areas of meeting basic needs, connecting people to quality jobs, building personal assets and transforming communities. As a strategic investor, the Foundation makes long-term commitments that yield tangible results through both grants and program-related investments.

    For more information, please visit www.news.prudential.com or follow us @prudentialnews or @prudentialbyc.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:

    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    Earlier today, President Obama spoke at the launch of the My Brother’s Keeper Alliance (MBK Alliance), a nonprofit that aims to help close the achievement gap for young men of color. Boys and young men of color represent one of the fastest-growing segments of the population, but nearly one-quarter of Hispanic and Black men between ages 16 and 24 are neither in school nor employed. NCLR (National Council of La Raza) is pleased to join this diverse coalition of advocates to eliminate economic and educational disparities and open opportunities for young men of color.

    “The keys to ensuring that young men of color develop the necessary skills to compete in the workforce of the 21st century are education and engagement,” said Peggy McLeod, Deputy Vice President of Education and Workforce Development at NCLR, who will also serve as NCLR’s representative on the MBK Alliance board. “Overcoming the odds can be tough, especially for disconnected youth in low-income communities. But with targeted investments that focus on preparing young men with the skills that they need not only to graduate, but also to transition into full-time careers, we can truly help to shape our nation’s young men of color into the leaders of tomorrow.”

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    PARA DIVULGACIÓN INMEDIATA                                       Contactos:
    6 de mayo de 2015                                                                 Joseph Rendeiro
                                                                                                    jrendeiro@nclr.org
                                                                                                    (202) 776-1566

                                                                                                    Lisa Villareal
                                                                                                    lisa.villareal@prudential.com
                                                                                                    (973) 367-2503

    Una política estatal en California podría aumentar los ahorros para la jubilación de los latinos y servir como modelo para otros estados

    LOS ANGELES—Hoy, el Consejo Nacional de La Raza (NCLR por sus siglas en inglés) con el apoyo de Prudential Foundation, publicó el informe "Enhancing Latino Retirement Readiness in California"(Cómo Preparar Mejor a los Latinos que se Jubilan en California). El informe reveló que en comparación con otros grupos raciales y étnicos, los latinos de California son los que tienen menos probabilidades de trabajar para un empleador que les ofrezca un plan de jubilación. Además, el mismo informe puso de manifiesto que aun cuando los latinos tengan acceso a un plan en el lugar donde trabajan, la participación y los ahorros que ellos hagan son relativamente bajos.

    El informe de NCLR también revela que los latinos conforman la mayor parte de trabajadores que podrían beneficiarse del Programa de Ahorros para la Jubilación Secure Choice de California. En California, hay 3.8 millones de latinos que carecen acceso a un plan de jubilación en su lugar de trabajo.

    "El cambio que se hiciera en California representaría el futuro de América, puesto que nuestro estado es el lugar ideal para buscar soluciones a la creciente desigualdad económica", dijo Delia de la Vara, Vicepresidenta de la Región de California de NCLR. "Nuestro estudio revela que California tiene la oportunidad de evitar, a nivel nacional, una crisis inminente relacionada a la jubilación de los latinos y otros trabajadores si se ampliaran sus opciones de ahorro para la jubilación en el lugar donde ellos trabajan".

    Más de la mitad de todos los estadounidenses que en la actualidad están trabajando, no están preparados para una jubilación financieramente segura, lo que a la larga produciría una crisis de ahorros para su jubilación; hecho que pondría de manifiesto la vulnerabilidad de nuestra nación. El informe de NCLR se suma a la creciente evidencia que demuestra que la crisis que se avecina afectaría desproporcionadamente a los latinos.

    California es considerado ampliamente como un estado sobre el cual se presagian cambios demográficos nacionales. Más del 39 por ciento de la población del estado es latina. Se proyecta que entre 2010 y 2050, los latinos representan la mayor parte del crecimiento de la fuerza laboral estadounidense.

    "En Prudential nos comprometemos a ayudar a los latinos y a otras comunidades marginadas para proveerles un plan de jubilación y de seguridad financiera a largo plazo", dijo Harry Dalessio, Vicepresidente Senior de Ventas y Relaciones Estratégicas de Prudential Retirement. "Al ayudar a que estas comunidades se preparen para la jubilación de sus miembros es algo positivo para todos nosotros, nuestras comunidades, nuestra empresa. De este modo se logrará tener una economía más fuerte y exitosa cuando todo el mundo esté financieramente más seguro".

    "La educación financiera y la capacitación deben ir de la mano con los planes de jubilación del lugar de trabajo", dijo Maggie Cervantes, Directora Ejecutiva de NEW Economics for Women, una corporación de desarrollo comunitario sin fines de lucro. que forma parte de los afiliados de NCLR en Los Ángeles. "Es de vital importancia que los latinos entiendan la importancia de ahorrar para su jubilación ya que a través de los estudios realizados en este tema revelan que los latinos, especialmente las mujeres latinas, en California viven más que las mujeres de cualquier otro grupo étnico".

    En 2012 se aprobó la ley Secure Choice que proporcionaría la oportunidad de abrir Cuentas de Retiro Individual (Individual Retiremente Accounts o IRAs, por sus siglas en inglés) a los trabajadores cuyos empleadores no ofrezcan un plan de jubilación. Aunque actualmente el programa se halla en la fase de diseño, el programa incluye una serie de características importantes que podrían ampliar las oportunidades de ahorros para la jubilación, incluyendo la inscripción automática para jubilarse dentro de los planes del lugar de trabajo y la capacidad de mantener una cuenta bancaria aunque el trabajador cambie de trabajo.

    "Aunque no existe una sola respuesta a nuestros desafíos para establecer ahorros para la jubilación, Secure Choice podría servir como modelo para el resto de la nación sobre cómo se puede ampliar el acceso y la participación de los trabajadores en los planes del lugar de trabajo", concluyó de Delia de la Vara. "El éxito de Secure Choice dependerá de cuán exitoso es convertir a los trabajadores latinos en ahorradores".

    Además de examinar las barreras que impiden que los trabajadores ahorren, como también lo que Secure Choice les ofrece, en el informe se detallan recomendaciones adicionales para ayudar a los latinos de todo el país a prepararse mejor para su jubilación. Entre esas recomendaciones se incluye el establecimiento de un crédito impositivo estatal para los ahorradores de bajos ingresos, aumento del salario mínimo de acuerdo al aumento del costo de vida, y el apoyo a las organizaciones comunitarias sin fines de lucro que proveen capacitación financiera para ayudar a que las familias marginadas tengan objetivos y establezcan cuentas de ahorro y créditos.

    "Prudential se enorgullece de asociarse con NCLR en esta investigación y crear conciencia sobre la crisis de la jubilación entre los latinos en California y otros estados", dijo Lata Reddy, vicepresidenta de Responsabilidad Social Corporativa de Prudential Financial, y presidenta de Prudential Foundation. "Esperamos que este informe ayude a identificar las barreras que existen para que los trabajadores de la comunidad latina y otras comunidades marginadas ahorren para su jubilación".

    El Consejo Nacional de La Raza (NCLR, por sus siglas en inglés) –la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos– trabaja para mejorar las oportunidades de los estadounidenses hispanos. Para más información sobre NCLR, visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

    Prudential Foundation es una corporación sin fines de lucro que opera con el apoyo de The Prudential Insurance Company of America, una filial de seguros de Prudential Financial Inc. of the U.S. La Fundación se aboca al cambio sistémico cuya meta es eliminar las barreras de mobilidad socio-económica en las áreas para satisfacer necesidades básicas, conectando la gente a empleos de calidad, promover las reservas de bienes personales y transformar comunidades. Como un inversor estratégico, la Fundación promueve compromisos a largo plazo que producen resultados tangibles a través de donaciones e inversiones vinculadas a sus programas.

    Prudential Financial, Inc. (NYSE: PRU), un líder de servicios financieros que hasta el 31 de diciembre de 2014 maneja más de 1 billón de dólares de activos, opera en Estados Unidos, Asia, Europa y América Latina. Los talentosos empleados de Prudential se han comprometido a ayudar a los clientes, individuales e institucionales, a crecer y proteger su riqueza a través de una variedad de productos y servicios, que incluyen seguros de vida, anualidades, servicios relacionados con la jubilación, manejo y creación de fondos de inversión. Durante más de un siglo en los EE.UU., la simbólica roca de Prudential es sinónimo de fortaleza, estabilidad, experiencia e innovación. Para obtener más información, por favor visite www.news.prudential.com.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                 Contacts:
    May 6, 2015                                                                            Joseph Rendeiro
                                                                                                    jrendeiro@nclr.org
                                                                                                    (202) 776-1566

                                                                                                    Lisa Villareal
                                                                                                    lisa.villareal@prudential.com
                                                                                                    (973) 367-2503

    California state policy solution could increase Latinos’ retirement savings and serve as model for other states

    LOS ANGELES—Today, NCLR (National Council of La Raza), with support from The Prudential Foundation, released a report, “Enhancing Latino Retirement Readiness in California.” The report found that compared to other racial/ethnic groups, Latinos in California are the least likely to work for an employer that offers a retirement plan. The report also revealed that even among Latinos who have access to a plan at work, participation and savings are relatively low.

    NCLR’s report also finds that Latinos make up the largest share of workers who could benefit from the California Secure Choice Retirement Savings Program. There are 3.8 million Latinos in California who lack access to a workplace retirement plan.

    “California’s makeup represents the future of America, making our state the ideal place to seek solutions to growing economic inequality,” said Delia de la Vara, Vice President, NCLR California Region. “Our study shows that California has the opportunity to prevent a national retirement crisis by expanding options for Latinos and others to save for retirement in the workplace.”
    More than half of all working-age Americans are unprepared for a financially secure retirement, leaving the nation vulnerable to a retirement savings crisis. The NCLR report adds to the growing body of evidence demonstrating that the looming crisis would disproportionately affect Latinos.

    California is widely considered a harbinger of national demographic changes. More than 39 percent of the state’s population is Latino. Latinos are projected to account for most of the growth in the American workforce between 2010 and 2050.

    “At Prudential, we’re committed to helping Latinos and other underserved communities plan for both their retirements and overall financial security along the way,” said Harry Dalessio, Senior Vice President of Sales and Strategic Relationships at Prudential Retirement. “Helping these communities prepare for retirement is a positive for all of us—our communities, our company and the economy will be stronger and more successful if everyone is more financially secure.”

    “Financial education and coaching must go hand in hand with workplace retirement plans,” said Maggie Cervantes, Executive Director of NEW Economics for Women, a nonprofit community development corporation and NCLR Affiliate in Los Angeles. “It is vitally important that Latinos understand the importance of saving for their retirement as studies have shown that Latinos, especially Latinas, in California live longer than any other ethnic group.”
    Passed into law in 2012, Secure Choice would provide Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) for workers whose employers do not offer a retirement plan. Currently in the design phase, the program includes a number of important features that could expand opportunities to save for retirement, including automatic enrollment in workplace plans and the ability to keep an account when changing jobs.

    “While there is not one answer to our retirement savings challenges, Secure Choice could serve as a model for the rest of the nation in how to expand access and participation in workplace plans,” concluded de la Vara. “The success of Secure Choice will depend on how successful it is in converting Latino workers into savers.”

    In addition to examining the barriers that prevent Latino workers from saving, as well evaluating Secure Choice, the report offers additional recommendations to help Latinos nationwide better prepare for retirement. These include establishing a state tax credit for low-income savers, raising the minimum wage to an amount that will keep up with the rising cost of living, and supporting nonprofit community-based organizations that provide financial coaching to help underserved families set goals and build savings and credit.

    “Prudential is proud to partner with NCLR on this research and raise awareness of the retirement readiness crisis among Latinos in California and beyond,” said Lata Reddy, Vice President of Corporate Social Responsibility at Prudential Financial and President of The Prudential Foundation. “We hope this report helps identify the barriers to saving for retirement faced by the Latino community and other underserved communities.”

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

    The Prudential Foundation is a nonprofit corporation supported by The Prudential Insurance Company of America, an insurance subsidiary of Prudential Financial Inc. of the U.S. The Prudential Foundation advocates for systemic change focused on eliminating barriers to financial and social mobility in the areas of meeting basic needs, connecting people to quality jobs, building personal assets and transforming communities. As a strategic investor, the Foundation makes long-term commitments that yield tangible results through both grants and program related investments.

    Prudential Financial, Inc. (NYSE:PRU), a financial services leader with more than $1 trillion of assets under management as of December 31, 2014, has operations in the United States, Asia, Europe, and Latin America. Prudential’s diverse and talented employees are committed to helping individual and institutional customers grow and protect their wealth through a variety of products and services, including life insurance, annuities, retirement-related services, mutual funds and investment management. In the U.S., Prudential’s iconic Rock symbol has stood for strength, stability, expertise and innovation for more than a century. For more information, please visit www.news.prudential.com.

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    PARA DIVULGACIÓN INMEDIATA                                                   PARA MÁS INFORMACIÓN:
    17 de septiembre, 2014                                                                    Camila Gallardo
                                                                                                            (305) 215-4259
                                                                                                            cgallardo@nclr.org

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—c. Comparado al año anterior, en el 2013 se reportó que 900,000 adultos y 500,000 niños lograron salir de la pobreza. A pesar de esto, todavía existen disparidades significantes.. La tasa de pobreza entre los latinos se mantiene alta en un 23.5% en el 2013, casi el doble del nivel nacional de 14.5%. Antes de la Gran Recesión, la tasa de pobreza para los hispanos fue de un 20.6 %. En el 2013, una familia de cuatro personas era considerada en nivel de pobreza si su ingreso total sumaba menos de $23,624.

    “Estamos satisfechos de ver que estos indicadores económicos han mejorado para nuestra comunidad. Medio millón de niños hispanos en el país han salido de la pobreza y esto es un testamento del de la ética de trabajo y los sacrificios que han hecho las familias hispanas por sus hijos,” dijo Eric Rodriguez, Vice President, Office of Research, Advocacy, and Legislation en el Consejo Nacional de La Raza (NCLR por sus siglas en inglés). “A pesar de esto, todos los trabajadores americanos, incluyendo a los latinos, hubiesen visto aumentos aún más significantes si no fuera por las decisiones tomadas por el congreso que han retrasado el crecimiento y han cortado inversiones en la educación y servicios de vivienda y nutrición. Esta agenda austera en conjunto con ingresos estancados han dejado a demasiadas familias con ingresos insuficientes para proveer sus necesidades básicas.”

    En una encuesta del NCLR y Latino Decisions tomada este julio entre votantes latinos, los encuestados reconocieron que la economía está mejorando pero siguen con altos niveles de ansiedad sobre sus finanzas personales. En víspera de las elecciones, un gran número de votantes hispanos están preocupados de perder su empleo y el 70% de encuestados dicen que no están ganando lo suficiente para proveer sus necesidades básicas. La tasa de desempleo entre los latinos es un 7.5% comparado con la tasa de 6.1% entre todos los trabajadores al nivel nacional.

    “Es alentador ver a tantos latinos regresar al mercado laboral, a la vez, los ingresos no están creciendo al mismo paso que el costo de vida y muchos están luchando para mantenerse fuera de la pobreza,” continuó Rodriguez. “Mientras tanto, subiendo el salario mínimo nacional a $10.10 ayudaría a aumentar el ingreso de casi siete millones de trabajadores latinos.”

    El apoyo a un salario mínimo más alto y un aumento en inversiones en áreas de prioridad para los latinos, jugarán un papel clave en cómo y por quien votan los latinos en noviembre. Una mayoría (el 55%) de los encuestados en julio dijeron que serían más propensos a votar por un candidato que apoya a aumentar el salario mínimo. Casi la mitad (el 47%) de los encuestados dijeron que serían menos propensos a votar por un candidato que votaría a favor de seguir cortando el presupuesto de programas gubernamentales. Programas como el SNAP y el Crédito Tributario de Niños, el Programa de Seguro de Salud de Niños (CHIP por sus siglas en inglés), y el Seguro Social son esenciales para ayudar a disminuir la tasa de pobreza entre los niños hispanos.

    “Como otros americanos, la seguridad de empleo y las finanzas personales son temas de prioridad para los votantes hispanos,” concluyó Rodriguez. “Nuestra comunidad apoyará a líderes que demuestren que nos están escuchando y que apoyen acciones que suban los ingresos y amplien las oportunidades de familias para que provean sus necesidades básicas.”

    El NCLR es la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos y trabaja para mejorar sus oportunidades. Para más información sobre el NCLR, por favor visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                           Contact:
    May 12, 2015                                                                                  Julian Teixeira
                                                                                                          (202) 776-1812
                                                                                                          jteixeira@nclr.org
     

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—Today, at a briefing for reporters with representatives from Latino Decisions and the Center for American Progress, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) released “Investing in Our Future: A Latino Policy Agenda for the 114th Congress,” a comprehensive look at issues and legislation that affect the Latino community and recommendations for action at the federal and state levels. The guide provides policymakers with concrete steps they can take to improve educational and economic outcomes for Latino families, support enrollment in health insurance and move forward on passing comprehensive immigration reform. Latinos are a growing segment of the U.S. population and a critical part of our nation’s future workforce; their success is intrinsically tied to the success of our nation and our future economic prosperity.

    The morning briefing also highlighted the growing geographic diversity of the electorate, how Congress has failed to address many of the community’s priorities and the political consequences of ignoring this increasingly influential voting bloc. The Latino electorate has grown exponentially in the last several election cycles; in fact, figures demonstrate that approximately 900,000 Latinos turn 18 each year and become eligible to vote, adding their voices to the 25 million eligible Hispanic voters in the country. That electorate is not simply growing in numbers—it is also expanding its influence. According to a recent study by the Center for American Progress, shifting state demographics mean that many candidates will likely need the support of racial and ethnic minority voters to get elected.

    “The Latino vote continues to grow across every single state, and 2016 will see a record number of Latinos eligible to vote. However, the 2014 midterms demonstrated that turnout is not guaranteed. Candidates and campaigns need to work hard to win trust from Latino voters by showing that they stand with Latinos on the issues,” said Dr. Thomas Schaller, Political Director, Latino Decisions. “If the campaigns do a good job of meaningfully engaging the Latino community, we will see record Latino turnout in 2016.”

    Despite this, many policymakers continue to ignore the Latino priorities outlined in NCLR’s policy agenda, such as enacting comprehensive immigration reform and advancing an economic agenda that bolsters working families. Moreover, many elected officials seek to undermine Latino priorities by rolling back the Affordable Care Act and the Dodd-Frank Act and blocking or defunding the president’s immigration actions.

    “For two years after the Senate passed comprehensive immigration reform with a bipartisan vote, House Republicans have failed to even take a vote, showing just one of many ways conservatives in Congress have stood in the way of Latino families getting ahead in America. The Latino community is woven into the American community now, a growing part of the electorate and our economy,” said Arkadi Gerney, Senior Vice President of Campaigns and Strategies, Center for American Progress. “Unfortunately, GOP candidates and members of Congress oppose not just executive action on immigration but also increasing the minimum wage, the Affordable Care Act and many other policies that help Latino families—and all Americans—get ahead.”

    While the performance has been underwhelming, policymakers and candidates have an opportunity in the coming months to engage Latino voters by making substantive progress on top issues in the lead-up to the 2016 elections. The Latino agenda released today provides a blueprint for action that will benefit not just those seeking office but the nation as a whole.

    “Latinos are looking closely at those who are courting their vote in 2016. It’s not good enough to say the right thing; they need to do the right thing. That means passing critical reform measures on immigration and education, supporting policies that promote economic and employment opportunities for Latinos and protecting access to high-quality health care,” said Eric Rodriguez, Vice President, Office of Research, Advocacy and Legislation, NCLR. “Candidates who ignore these priorities will discover that this pivotal voting bloc will throw its support behind others who back up their words with decisive action and a show of leadership.”

    A summary of the policy agenda is available here.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                     Contact:
    May 13, 2015                                                                                                             Julian Teixeira
                                                                                                                                       (202) 776-1812
                                                                                                                                       jteixeira@nclr.org

    Organizations Launch Multiyear Latino Millennials College and Careers Program

    LOS ANGELES—NCLR (National Council of La Raza) today announced a new, multiyear workforce development program in partnership with Wells Fargo to raise awareness about careers in financial services, encouraging Latino millennials to apply. The program, Latino Millennials in College and Careers, provides young Latinos entering the workforce a range of tools, resources and information needed to pursue careers and potentially gain employment in financial services.

    “Latino youth are the fastest-growing segment of the American workforce, yet many still are unaware of the tremendous career opportunities that exist in the financial services area,” said Delia Pompa, Senior Vice President of Programs at NCLR. “We are pleased about our partnership with Wells Fargo and our joint efforts to not only inform Latino millennials about careers in financial services, but inspire and create the next generation of leaders in the financial services sector.”

    The program highlights a series of activities including in-person workshops and webinars that cater to Latino millennials, depending on where participants are in their development journey. The initiative includes:

    • High school students: A financial services leadership module for the NCLR Escalera Program will allow participants to explore careers and opportunities in the financial services sector. The Escalera Program’s principal components are career exploration, technology skills development, leadership development, personal development and academic support. The program addresses various youth population needs and creates awareness about high-demand careers.
    • College students: NCLR’s Líderes Avanzando program offers a series of workshops and other activities to support students through graduation. Wells Fargo will provide participating college students the opportunity to start a financial services career with summer internships while in college, join full-time programs upon graduation and gain cross-functional exposure and leadership experience in banking, insurance, investments, marketing and other areas. The program is currently being piloted in Los Angeles and will officially kick off in the fall of 2015 in select markets including Los Angeles and San Antonio, Texas.
    • Workforce: NCLR, in partnership with its Affiliate AltaMed Health Services, is creating a curriculum to train Latino millennials for employment in the financial sector. Participants will develop the necessary skills to start banking careers as bilingual tellers, customer service associates and financial representatives. The program is designed to enhance the Latino community’s ability to contribute to and share in the nation’s economic opportunities by boosting Hispanic employment and bridging Latino workers’ skills gaps.

    “We are pleased to be partnering with NCLR and Wells Fargo,” said Ozzie Lopez, Director of Workforce Development at AltaMed Health Services in Los Angeles. “Serving as the pilot site, we have seen firsthand how providing such support and guidance is greatly needed, especially since many of our students are the first in their families who will go to college. The Líderes Avanzando program is preparing them to succeed not only with their studies, but also with their career aspirations.”

    “Wells Fargo is committed to supporting NCLR’s efforts to promote long-term economic growth and quality of life in our neighborhoods,” said Oscar Suris, Head of Corporate Communications at Wells Fargo and member of NCLR’s Corporate Board of Advisors. “The company’s investment in NCLR’s workforce development program is one of the many ways we strive to strengthen our communities and support the next generation of young leaders entering the workforce.”

    For nearly a decade, NCLR has collaborated with Wells Fargo through a multimillion-dollar partnership to address needs that impact the Latino community. Funding is targeted to support community outreach and development efforts including homeownership counseling, workforce development and financial education programs serving primarily low- to moderate-income communities.

    About Wells Fargo
    Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE: WFC) is a nationwide, diversified, community-based financial services company with $1.7 trillion in assets. Founded in 1852 and headquartered in San Francisco, Wells Fargo provides banking, insurance, investments, mortgage, and consumer and commercial finance through more than 8,700 locations, 12,500 ATMs, and the internet (wellsfargo.com) and mobile banking, and has offices in 36 countries to support customers who conduct business in the global economy. With approximately 266,000 team members, Wells Fargo serves one in three households in the United States. Wells Fargo & Company was ranked No. 29 on Fortune’s 2014 rankings of America’s largest corporations. Wells Fargo’s vision is to satisfy all our customers’ financial needs and help them succeed financially. Wells Fargo perspectives are also available at Wells Fargo Blogs and Wells Fargo Stories.

    About NCLR
    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

    Contacts:
    Julian Teixeira
    NCLR
    (202) 776-1812
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    Edna Silva
    Wells Fargo
    (213) 248-1415
    Edna.M.Silva@wellsfargo.com

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    PARA SU PUBLICACIÓN INMEDIATA                                                        Comuníquese con:
    13 de mayo de 2015                                                                                      Julián Teixeira
                                                                                                                           (202) 776-1812 (en inglés)
                                                                                                                           jteixeira@nclr.org

    Lanzamiento del Programa plurianual de carreras y estudios universitarios para los latinos de la generación del milenio

    LOS ANGELES— El Consejo Nacional de la Raza (NCLR por sus siglas en inglés) anunció hoy un nuevo programa plurianual de desarrollo de la fuerza laboral en asociación con Wells Fargo. El propósito de este programa es generar interés en las carreras del sector de servicios financieros y alentar a los latinos de la generación del milenio a seguirlas. El programa, “Los latinos de la generación del milenio en carreras y estudios universitarios”, proporciona a los jóvenes latinos de la generación del milenio que van a ingresar en la fuerza laboral una variedad de herramientas, recursos e información valiosa necesarios para emprender carreras y potencialmente conseguir empleo en el área de servicios financieros.

    “Los jóvenes latinos constituyen el segmento de más rápido crecimiento de la fuerza laboral de los Estados Unidos y, aun así, muchos de ellos desconocen las excelentes oportunidades de empleo que existen en el área de servicios financieros”, expresó Delia Pompa, vicepresidenta sénior de programas del NCLR. “Estamos contentos por nuestra colaboración con Wells Fargo y por nuestras iniciativas conjuntas orientadas no sólo a informar a los jóvenes latinos de la generación del milenio sobre las carreras en el área de servicios financieros, sino también a inspirar y crear la próxima generación de líderes de este sector.

    El programa destaca una serie de actividades que incluyen talleres presenciales y seminarios por Internet dirigidos a los latinos de la generación del milenio, según el nivel de desarrollo académico de cada participante. La iniciativa incluye lo siguiente:

    • Estudiantes de escuelas secundarias: un módulo del programa sobre liderazgo en servicios financieros para quienes participan actualmente en el programa Escalera del NCLR. En este módulo, se analizan las carreras y las oportunidades disponibles en el sector de servicios financieros. Los principales componentes del programa son el análisis de las carreras, el desarrollo de habilidades tecnológicas, el desarrollo de liderazgo, el desarrollo personal y el apoyo académico. El programa contempla las diversas necesidades de la población joven y da a conocer las carreras de alta demanda.
    • Estudiantes universitarios: el programa Líderes Avanzando del NCLR ofrece el apoyo necesario para graduarse a través de una serie de talleres y otras actividades. Wells Fargo brindará a los estudiantes universitarios participantes la oportunidad de iniciar una carrera en servicios financieros. Para ello, los estudiantes podrán realizar pasantías de verano mientras se encuentren en la universidad, comenzar programas de tiempo completo tras la graduación y adquirir experiencia multidisciplinaria y de liderazgo en servicios bancarios, seguros, inversiones, mercadeo y otras áreas. Actualmente, se está llevando a cabo la prueba piloto del programa en Los Ángeles y el lanzamiento oficial se realizará durante el otoño de 2015 en mercados específicos, como Los Ángeles y San Antonio, Texas.
    • Fuerza laboral: el NCLR en asociación con su afiliado AltaMed está desarrollando un programa para capacitar a los latinos de la generación del milenio a fin de emplearlos en el sector financiero. El programa preparará a los participantes para que desarrollen las habilidades necesarias para iniciar una carrera en servicios bancarios como cajeros bilingües, empleados de servicio al cliente y representantes financieros. El programa está diseñado para mejorar la capacidad de la comunidad latina de contribuir a las oportunidades económicas de la nación y participar en ellas. Con este fin se ayuda a impulsar las oportunidades de empleo para los hispanos y a mejorar las habilidades de los trabajadores latinos.

    “Nos complace unirnos al NCLR y a Wells Fargo”, dijo Ozzie López, director de desarrollo de la fuerza laboral de AltaMed en Los Ángeles. “Ser el lugar para llevar a cabo la prueba piloto del programa nos ha permitido ver de primera mano la gran necesidad que hay de proveer apoyo y guía, especialmente cuando muchos de nuestros estudiantes son los primeros de sus familias en asistir a la universidad. El programa Líderes Avanzado los prepara para que tengan éxito no sólo en sus estudios, sino también en sus carreras”.

    “Wells Fargo se compromete a apoyar las iniciativas del NCLR de promover el crecimiento económico a largo plazo y la calidad de vida de todas nuestras comunidades”, dijo Oscar Suris, director de comunicaciones corporativas de Wells Fargo y miembro de la Junta Corporativa de Asesoría del NCLR. “La inversión de la compañía en el programa de desarrollo de la fuerza laboral del NCLR es una de las tantas maneras en que nos esforzamos por fortalecer nuestras comunidades y apoyar a la próxima generación de jóvenes líderes que ingresará en la fuerza laboral”.

    Durante casi una década, el NCLR ha colaborado con Wells Fargo a través de una alianza multimillonaria con el propósito de atender las necesidades que afectan a la comunidad latina. Este financiamiento tiene como objetivo apoyar las iniciativas de participación y desarrollo comunitario, que incluyen programas de asesoramiento para propietarios de vivienda, desarrollo de la fuerza laboral y educación financiera dirigidos principalmente a las comunidades con ingresos bajos y moderados.

    Acerca de Wells Fargo
    Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE: WFC) es una compañía de servicios financieros diversificados basada en la comunidad con cobertura nacional y activos que ascienden a $1.7 billones. Fundada en 1852 y con sede en San Francisco, Wells Fargo brinda servicios bancarios, seguros, inversiones, préstamos hipotecarios y financiamiento comercial y al consumidor a través de más de 8,700 sucursales, 12,500 cajeros automáticos (ATM), Internet (wellsfargo.com y wellsfargo.com/spanish) y banca móvil, y tiene oficinas en 36 países para respaldar a los clientes que realizan operaciones comerciales en la economía global. Con un equipo de aproximadamente 266,000 miembros, Wells Fargo presta sus servicios a uno de cada tres hogares en los Estados Unidos. En el año 2014, Wells Fargo & Company ocupó el puesto número 29 en la clasificación de las empresas más grandes de los Estados Unidos que elabora la revista Fortune. La visión de Wells Fargo consiste en satisfacer las necesidades financieras de todos sus clientes y ayudarles a alcanzar el éxito financiero. Las perspectivas de Wells Fargo también están disponibles en los Blogs de Wells Fargo (en inglés) y en las Historias de Wells Fargo (en inglés). 

    Acerca del NCLR
    El NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) es la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos y trabaja para mejorar sus oportunidades. Para más información sobre el NCLR, por favor visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

    Contactos:
    Julián Teixeira
    NCLR
    202-776-1812 (en inglés)
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    Edna Silva
    Wells Fargo
    213-248-1415
    Edna.M.Silva@wellsfargo.com

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    PARA SU PUBLICACIÓN INMEDIATA                                                        Comuníquese con:
    13 de mayo de 2015                                                                                      Julián Teixeira
                                                                                                                           (202) 776-1812 (en inglés)
                                                                                                                           jteixeira@nclr.org

    Lanzamiento del Programa plurianual de carreras y estudios universitarios para los latinos de la generación del milenio

    LOS ANGELES— El Consejo Nacional de la Raza (NCLR por sus siglas en inglés) anunció hoy un nuevo programa plurianual de desarrollo de la fuerza laboral en asociación con Wells Fargo. El propósito de este programa es generar interés en las carreras del sector de servicios financieros y alentar a los latinos de la generación del milenio a seguirlas. El programa, “Los latinos de la generación del milenio en carreras y estudios universitarios”, proporciona a los jóvenes latinos de la generación del milenio que van a ingresar en la fuerza laboral una variedad de herramientas, recursos e información valiosa necesarios para emprender carreras y potencialmente conseguir empleo en el área de servicios financieros.

    “Los jóvenes latinos constituyen el segmento de más rápido crecimiento de la fuerza laboral de los Estados Unidos y, aun así, muchos de ellos desconocen las excelentes oportunidades de empleo que existen en el área de servicios financieros”, expresó Delia Pompa, vicepresidenta sénior de programas del NCLR. “Estamos contentos por nuestra colaboración con Wells Fargo y por nuestras iniciativas conjuntas orientadas no sólo a informar a los jóvenes latinos de la generación del milenio sobre las carreras en el área de servicios financieros, sino también a inspirar y crear la próxima generación de líderes de este sector.

    El programa destaca una serie de actividades que incluyen talleres presenciales y seminarios por Internet dirigidos a los latinos de la generación del milenio, según el nivel de desarrollo académico de cada participante. La iniciativa incluye lo siguiente:

    • Estudiantes de escuelas secundarias: un módulo del programa sobre liderazgo en servicios financieros para quienes participan actualmente en el programa Escalera del NCLR. En este módulo, se analizan las carreras y las oportunidades disponibles en el sector de servicios financieros. Los principales componentes del programa son el análisis de las carreras, el desarrollo de habilidades tecnológicas, el desarrollo de liderazgo, el desarrollo personal y el apoyo académico. El programa contempla las diversas necesidades de la población joven y da a conocer las carreras de alta demanda.
    • Estudiantes universitarios: el programa Líderes Avanzando del NCLR ofrece el apoyo necesario para graduarse a través de una serie de talleres y otras actividades. Wells Fargo brindará a los estudiantes universitarios participantes la oportunidad de iniciar una carrera en servicios financieros. Para ello, los estudiantes podrán realizar pasantías de verano mientras se encuentren en la universidad, comenzar programas de tiempo completo tras la graduación y adquirir experiencia multidisciplinaria y de liderazgo en servicios bancarios, seguros, inversiones, mercadeo y otras áreas. Actualmente, se está llevando a cabo la prueba piloto del programa en Los Ángeles y el lanzamiento oficial se realizará durante el otoño de 2015 en mercados específicos, como Los Ángeles y San Antonio, Texas.
    • Fuerza laboral: el NCLR en asociación con su afiliado AltaMed está desarrollando un programa para capacitar a los latinos de la generación del milenio a fin de emplearlos en el sector financiero. El programa preparará a los participantes para que desarrollen las habilidades necesarias para iniciar una carrera en servicios bancarios como cajeros bilingües, empleados de servicio al cliente y representantes financieros. El programa está diseñado para mejorar la capacidad de la comunidad latina de contribuir a las oportunidades económicas de la nación y participar en ellas. Con este fin se ayuda a impulsar las oportunidades de empleo para los hispanos y a mejorar las habilidades de los trabajadores latinos.

    “Nos complace unirnos al NCLR y a Wells Fargo”, dijo Ozzie López, director de desarrollo de la fuerza laboral de AltaMed en Los Ángeles. “Ser el lugar para llevar a cabo la prueba piloto del programa nos ha permitido ver de primera mano la gran necesidad que hay de proveer apoyo y guía, especialmente cuando muchos de nuestros estudiantes son los primeros de sus familias en asistir a la universidad. El programa Líderes Avanzado los prepara para que tengan éxito no sólo en sus estudios, sino también en sus carreras”.

    “Wells Fargo se compromete a apoyar las iniciativas del NCLR de promover el crecimiento económico a largo plazo y la calidad de vida de todas nuestras comunidades”, dijo Oscar Suris, director de comunicaciones corporativas de Wells Fargo y miembro de la Junta Corporativa de Asesoría del NCLR. “La inversión de la compañía en el programa de desarrollo de la fuerza laboral del NCLR es una de las tantas maneras en que nos esforzamos por fortalecer nuestras comunidades y apoyar a la próxima generación de jóvenes líderes que ingresará en la fuerza laboral”.

    Durante casi una década, el NCLR ha colaborado con Wells Fargo a través de una alianza multimillonaria con el propósito de atender las necesidades que afectan a la comunidad latina. Este financiamiento tiene como objetivo apoyar las iniciativas de participación y desarrollo comunitario, que incluyen programas de asesoramiento para propietarios de vivienda, desarrollo de la fuerza laboral y educación financiera dirigidos principalmente a las comunidades con ingresos bajos y moderados.

    Acerca de Wells Fargo
    Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE: WFC) es una compañía de servicios financieros diversificados basada en la comunidad con cobertura nacional y activos que ascienden a $1.7 billones. Fundada en 1852 y con sede en San Francisco, Wells Fargo brinda servicios bancarios, seguros, inversiones, préstamos hipotecarios y financiamiento comercial y al consumidor a través de más de 8,700 sucursales, 12,500 cajeros automáticos (ATM), Internet (wellsfargo.com y wellsfargo.com/spanish) y banca móvil, y tiene oficinas en 36 países para respaldar a los clientes que realizan operaciones comerciales en la economía global. Con un equipo de aproximadamente 266,000 miembros, Wells Fargo presta sus servicios a uno de cada tres hogares en los Estados Unidos. En el año 2014, Wells Fargo & Company ocupó el puesto número 29 en la clasificación de las empresas más grandes de los Estados Unidos que elabora la revista Fortune. La visión de Wells Fargo consiste en satisfacer las necesidades financieras de todos sus clientes y ayudarles a alcanzar el éxito financiero. Las perspectivas de Wells Fargo también están disponibles en los Blogs de Wells Fargo (en inglés) y en las Historias de Wells Fargo (en inglés). 

    Acerca del NCLR
    El NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) es la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos y trabaja para mejorar sus oportunidades. Para más información sobre el NCLR, por favor visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

    Contactos:
    Julián Teixeira
    NCLR
    202-776-1812 (en inglés)
    jteixeira@nclr.org

    Edna Silva
    Wells Fargo
    213-248-1415
    Edna.M.Silva@wellsfargo.com

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Contact:

    Joseph Rendeiro
    (202) 776-1566
    jrendeiro@nclr.org

    In late 2014, President Obama announced he would take executive action to extend deportation relief to millions of undocumented immigrants through the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) program and the expansion of the highly successful Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Today marks the target date the administration initially set to begin implementing DAPA. However, in the wake of the president’s announcement, a number of states filed a politically motivated lawsuit to block implementation of the president’s executive actions, a lawsuit that has worked its way up to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals.

    “Instead of celebrating with the millions of families who would finally gain a reprieve from the needless separations that have torn apart our communities, today we continue to navigate this drawn-out, unnecessary litigation that has left so many American families in limbo,” said Clarissa Martínez-De-Castro, Deputy Vice President of the Office of Research, Advocacy and Legislation at NCLR (National Council of La Raza). “By pursuing this lawsuit, the opponents of these programs accomplish nothing beyond damaging our economy, jeopardizing our national security and attacking Latino families.”

    “As we await a decision, we remind those who seek to deny millions of families the benefits of DACA and DAPA that the president was well within his constitutional authority to implement these programs,” Martínez-De-Castro continued. “The diverse coalition of allies in our movement will continue to defend the president’s executive actions and help individuals and families prepare to apply so they are ready when the process begins.”

    For information about how to apply for administrative relief, please visit www.nclr.org. For the most up-to-date information about changing immigration laws, policies and news, download Immigo, a free app designed for anyone assisting immigrants. The app, which works with iPhone and Android devices, can be downloaded from the Apple iTunes and Google Play stores.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                Contact:
    May 26, 2015                                                                        Julian Teixeira
                                                                                                   (202) 776-1812
                                                                                                   jteixeira@nclr.org

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—Earlier today, a panel of judges for the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals denied a request to grant an emergency stay of the preliminary injunction blocking the implementation of immigration relief programs created through executive action. NCLR (National Council of La Raza) is disappointed in this decision, which leaves millions of American families in limbo as they wait to apply for the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) program and the expanded Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. This is not the end of legal proceedings on this matter, however, as an appeal of the preliminary injunction is scheduled for the week of July 6.

    While this is a setback, this is not the end of the long and arduous legal road. It is important to note that the Fifth Circuit Court has still not decided on the full appeal of the case to lift the injunction.

    “Although we are unquestionably disappointed in today’s ruling, this is not the end of the road but a delay in what we believe will be an eventual victory,” said Clarissa Martínez-De-Castro, Deputy Vice President, Office of Research, Advocacy and Legislation, NCLR. “Our community remains steadfast in our commitment to keeping hardworking families together. Not only will these executive actions bring relief to millions of American families, they are in the best interest of this nation’s economy and national security.”

    “Those who continue to block commonsense relief to settle a score with the president should realize that their political gamesmanship is destroying lives and alienating an increasingly influential voting bloc, who will remember these very personal attacks on our families and our community come Election Day,” added Martínez-De-Castro. “It should not be lost on anyone that a key function of the president is to nominate federal judges, and for the Senate to ‘advise and consent’ to those nominations. We will continue to remind our community that by exercising their power at the ballot box, they can help determine who will be making judicial decisions that, with the stroke of a pen, can snatch potential lawful status away from millions.”

    For information about how to apply for the existing DACA program, which remains unchanged, please visit www.nclr.org. For the most up-to-date information about changing immigration laws, policies and news, download Immigo, a free app designed for anyone working with immigrants. The app, which works with iPhone and Android devices, can be downloaded from the Apple iTunes and Google Play stores.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                     Contact:
    May 27, 2015                                                                                            Catherine Brady
                                                                                                                    (617) 945-9316; catherine@jpa.com
                                                                                                                    Caroline DeLaney
                                                                                                                    (202) 417-3911; caroline@pcpcc.net
                                                                                                                    Kathy Mimberg
                                                                                                                    (202) 776-1714; kmimberg@nclr.org

    Report Focuses on Primary Care Settings and the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    Leawood, KS – Today, Peers for Progress, a program of the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation, the Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative (PCPCC), and NCLR (National Council of La Raza) issued a report from their joint conference, held this spring. The conference explored the vital role that peer support through group visits, support groups, or individual coaching provided by Community Health Workers (CHWs), Promotores de Salud, Navigators, and others can play in improving patient health outcomes, particularly when integrated into primary care and Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) settings.

    Evidence presented at the conference demonstrated that CHWs and others providing peer support not only reduce health care costs and improve access to care, but also are practical and adaptable to a variety of practice settings. Peer support and PCMH share common values and goals, emphasizing healthy lifestyles, disease prevention, and whole person care that is responsive to individual, family, and community needs. The conference report follows the release of a suite of program development resources designed to support and guide efforts for implementing and improving peer support programs.

    “Our health care system is in a dire situation: the lack of practical resources and frameworks for building lasting programs means pressing human health needs are left unmet,” said Edwin B. Fisher, global director of Peers for Progress. “Evidence from around the world shows that primary care and Patient-Centered Medical Homes can improve care and outcomes. Peer support can be the linchpin that links people in need to their care. Together, they can take big steps to assure ‘the right care at the right time for the right price.’”

    When integrated into primary care settings, peer support has been shown to be highly successful. Peer support also plays a critical role in implementing the goals of the Affordable Care Act to emphasize prevention, and to achieve greater quality of and satisfaction with care.

    "When you look at the research, you'll find a link between the contributions of peer support and positive health outcomes," said Marci Nielsen, PhD, MPH, Chief Executive Officer of the Patient-Centered Primary Collaborative. "Many of these programs have the ability to extend beyond the reach of traditional fee-for-service health care. Peer support is a natural complement to advanced primary care and can be an important part of promoting clinic-to-community linkages, offering in-home support to patients and their families or caregivers, while at the same time reducing unnecessary and costly care.”

    Peer support can also further a key objective of the PCMH: to engage the whole person in the management of their care, and to contextualize care within the perspective of the values, interests, family, language, and community that frame individual lives. This approach has been shown to be particularly effective in closely-knit communities.

    “Promotores de Salud are effective at changing health behaviors because they are able to connect with communities in a way that is culturally and linguistically appropriate, and account for the challenges that individuals and communities are facing,” said A. Manuela McDonough, Associate Director, Institute for Hispanic Health, NCLR. “Within the Latino community, peer supporters have helped individuals learn to eat healthier foods, exercise in a way that fits into their daily routines, and better follow the plans they arrange with their clinical teams. We are looking forward to seeing these programs expand in tandem with Patient-Centered Medical Homes and primary care.”

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    About Peers for Progress
    A program of the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation, Peers for Progress is dedicated to promoting peer support in health, health care and prevention around the world. Through research, collaborative sharing of program and quality improvement resources, and supporting advocacy, it seeks to help the thousands of peer support programs around the world learn from each other, improve the services they offer, gain greater recognition of their work, and achieve integration of peer support as a normal, widely available component of high-quality health care. Peers for Progress is supported by grants from the Eli Lilly and Company Foundation and the Bristol Myers Squibb Foundation’s Together on Diabetes Initiative. For more information on Peers for Progress, visit www.peersforprogress.org, or follow us on Twitter at @peers4progress.


    About the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation
    The Foundation serves as the philanthropic arm of the American Academy of Family Physicians. Its primary mission is to advance the values of family medicine by promoting humanitarian, educational, and scientific initiatives that improve the health of all people.

    For more information, please visit www.aafpfoundation.org.


    About the Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative
    Founded in 2006, the Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative (PCPCC) is a not-for-profit membership organization dedicated to advancing an effective and efficient health system built on a strong foundation of primary care and the patient-centered medical home. The PCPCC achieves its mission through the work of its five Stakeholder Centers, led by experts and thought leaders dedicated to transforming the U.S. health care system through delivery reform, payment reform, patient engagement, and benefit redesign. Today, PCPCC’s membership has grown to over 1,200 diverse stakeholder organizations who represent health care providers across the care continuum, payers and purchasers, and patients and their families.


    About NCLR
    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org, or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.


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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                           Contact:
    June 1, 2015                                                                     Camila Gallardo
                                                                                              cgallardo@nclr.org
                                                                                              (305) 215-4259

    WASHINGTON, D.C.—As the Florida State Legislature prepares to reconvene this afternoon to begin a special session, NCLR (National Council of La Raza) is calling on state leaders to move forward on legislation that will help close the health coverage gap for nearly one million Floridians, including 200,000 Latinos. The impasse on whether to accept federal funding that would enable the state to expand its Medicaid program and increase access to health insurance for those who fall into the coverage gap has threatened to shut down the state government if an agreement cannot be reached by July 1.

    During the regular session, the Florida State Senate unanimously passed a fiscally responsible budget that included accepting $50 billion in federal dollars to provide health insurance to low-income people, including workers, veterans, parents and people with disabilities. The $50 billion in federal funds have already been paid for through taxes on health insurance premiums and durable medical equipment, reductions in Medicare payments to hospitals and cuts to hospital disproportionate share payments.

    “The lives of nearly one million Floridians hang in the balance while the State Senate engages in what is clearly an ideological tug of war between the State House and the governor that benefits no one. Every day, up to six Floridians die because they lack access to affordable health insurance—that is immoral when we know the federal government is standing by with the funding necessary to provide coverage to those who need it most,” said Jared Nordlund, Florida Senior Strategist, NCLR.

    Last month, Governor Rick Scott sued the Obama administration over its intent to cut in half the federal funding provided for the state’s Low Income Pool (LIP). LIP reimburses doctors and hospitals for medical care provided to those who cannot afford to pay. The Department of Health and Human Services has rightly claimed that expanding Medicaid and enrolling Floridians in insurance through the ACA exchange would provide a better solution since it covers the individual’s comprehensive health care needs, including important preventative benefits.

    “Ultimately, expanding the number of insured Floridians will reduce the need for LIP as well as cut down on higher-cost emergency room visits. LIP is not health insurance and not the solution working families deserve; increasing access to health insurance is. This should not be used as one more distraction from the fact that the State House and the governor are failing to respond to the critical health care needs of a significant segment of the state’s population,” continued Nordlund.

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                               Contact:
    June 3, 2015                                                                                         Julian Teixeira
                                                                                                                  (202) 776-1812
                                                                                                                  jteixeira@nclr.org

    Panelists to highlight how California’s community-based programs promote Hispanic youth development and strengthen families

    LOS ANGELESNCLR (National Council of La Raza) and AltaMed Health Services will host a forum on Wednesday, June 10, to examine the comprehensive, culturally sensitive community programs in California that help keep Latino youth out of the juvenile justice system. In addition to education experts, speakers will include teenagers from NCLR’s youth leadership program and Dr. Patricia Foxen, author of the NCLR report, “Resilient Latino Youth: In Their Own Words,” which included young Latinos from Los Angeles among the research subjects.

    Slightly more than half of the 36,289 juvenile felony arrests and 67,817 misdemeanor arrests reported in California in 2012 were of Latino youth, according to the Public Policy Institute of California. As the state adopts new policies such as Proposition 47—which reduces some nonviolent felony punishments to misdemeanors—it has revived a national debate on how to most effectively redirect resources from incarceration to community programs, particularly those that help at-risk Hispanic and Black youth.

    Media interested in attending the event should RSVP to Julian Teixeira at jteixeira@nclr.org or (202) 776-1812.

    MEDIA ADVISORY

    WHAT:   Panel discussion: “Fostering Resilient Latino Youth in California: A Culturally Sensitive, Community-Based Approach”

    WHO:     Delia de la Vara, Vice President, California Region, NCLR (Moderator)
                   Dr. Feliza Ortiz-Licon, Senior Director, K–16 Education Programs, NCLR
                   Dr. Patricia Foxen, Deputy Director of Research, NCLR
                   Desiree Valadez, Workforce Development Program Manager, AltaMed Health Services
                   Mike de la Rocha, Founder, Revolve Impact
                   Youth from the NCLR Líderes Avanzando Program

    WHEN:    June 10, 2015, 1:00–2:30 p.m.

    WHERE: AltaMed Health Services
                    Conference Room MP 120/123
                    2040 Camfield Avenue
                    Los Angeles, CA 90040

    NCLR—the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the United States—works to improve opportunities for Hispanic Americans. For more information on NCLR, please visit www.nclr.org or follow along on Facebook and Twitter.

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    PARA DIVULGACIÓN INMEDIATA                                                      Contacto:
    3 de junio de 2015                                                                                  Julián Teixeira
                                                                                                                  (202) 776-1812
                                                                                                                   jteixeira@nclr.org

    Panelistas destacan cómo los programas comunitarios de California promueven el desarrollo de los jóvenes hispanos y fortalecen a las familias

    LOS ANGELES—El NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) y AltaMed llevarán a cabo un foro, el miércoles 10 de junio, para discutir los programas comunitarios integrales y adaptados culturalmente del estado que ayudan a mantener a los jóvenes latinos fuera del sistema de justicia juvenil. Además de los expertos en educación, entre los panelistas estarán adolescentes que participan en el programa de liderazgo juvenil del NCLR y la Dra. Patricia Foxen, autora del informe “Resilient Latino Youth: In Their Own Words (La resiliencia de la juventud latina: en sus propias palabras)” que incluyó entre sus sujetos investigados a jóvenes latinos de Los Angeles.

    De acuerdo con el Public Policy Institute of California, en el estado en 2012, un poco más de la mitad de las 36,289 detenciones de menores por delitos graves y 67,817 por delitos menores fueron de jóvenes latinos. El estado de California ha adoptado nuevas políticas como la Proposición 47, que reduce algunos de los castigos por delitos graves no violentos a delitos menores, ejemplo que sirve como importante contribución al debate nacional sobre cómo redirigir eficazmente los recursos de los programas de encarcelación a los programas comunitarios, especialmente los que ayudan a los jóvenes hispanos y negros en riesgo.

    Los miembros de la prensa que estén interesados en asistir al evento, deben hacer una reservación con Julián Teixeira en el correo electrónico jteixeira@nclr.org o llamando al (202) 776-1812.

    AVISO DE PRENSA

    QUÉ:          Panel de discusión: “Fomentar la resiliencia de los jóvenes latinos en California: un enfoque comunitario que respeta las diferencias culturales”

    QUIÉNES:  Delia de la Vara, vicepresidenta de la región de California del NCLR (Moderadora)
                       Dra. Feliza Ortiz-Licon, directora sénior de programas de educación para los grados K–16 del NCLR
                       Dra. Patricia Foxen, directora adjunta de investigación del NCLR
                       Desire Valadez, gerente del programa de desarrollo de la fuerza laboral de AltaMed Health Services
                       Mike de la Rocha, fundador, Revolve Impact
                       Jóvenes del programa Líderes Avanzando del NCLR

    CUÁNDO:  Miércoles, 10 de junio, 2015, 1:00–2:30 PM

    DÓNDE:    AltaMed Health Services
                      Sala de conferencias MP 120/123
                      2040 Camfield Avenue
                      Los Angeles, CA 90040

    El NCLR (Consejo Nacional de La Raza) es la organización nacional más grande de apoyo y defensa de los derechos civiles de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos y trabaja para mejorar sus oportunidades. Para más información sobre el NCLR, por favor visite www.nclr.org o síganos en Facebook y Twitter.

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